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    an alzheimers disease mouse model is a model that mimics alzheimers disease in human beings and is something we can use to understand the disease better and/ or test certain substances on. Is this correct?
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    (Original post by tammie123)
    an alzheimers disease mouse model is a model that mimics alzheimers disease in human beings and is something we can use to understand the disease better and/ or test certain substances on. Is this correct?
    That is correct, to a certain extent. There are many advantages of using a mouse model to study certain diseases like Alzheimer's, however there are a lot of ethical implications and barriers when performing this kind of research. Since mice are also mammals, their cells will share a lot of similar characteristics with human cells. If you apply a potential Alzheimer's treatment to an inflicted mouse model, it will provide a lot of information based on how eukaryotic cells may react to the treatment. This can then be compared to how a human would respond to the treatment. Another advantage would be to avoid the considerable ethical boundaries that would come with using a human test subject first. However, there are still many differences between mice and humans, thus we cannot assume that because a treatment works on mice, it must work on humans.

    Ultimately, the statement you've provided is correct. Every single drug treatment coming to market must be tested on animals first, before moving on to clinical trials. It may be worth reading up on the advantages and disadvantages of using animal models, as well as phases of clinical trials.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phases...nical_research
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animal_testing
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    The only issue is, we don't understand the disease well enough itself to produce accurate models. We've not properly established the cause of AD and hence haven't been able to make accurate models. Most models involve overexpression of tau or amyloid-beta, the two proteins which visibly form protein plaques during the disease. You get a lot of the symptoms, but not in the same time frame equivalents in mice (though arguably this is because the gene issues start from birth in the mice, instead of from a later age in human patients).

    Its the "ideal" scenario, but it rarely works out that way at all.
 
 
 
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