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    Hi
    I'm in year 12 and currently studying A-levels in English Lit, History, Biology and Spanish. The problem is, I'm not really sure which to drop? Previously I saw English Lit as one I would definitely take, as I was getting 8s and 9s in nearly all the practice essays we did in class, and in exam situations. However, in my GCSE I came out with a 7, which I know is still good, but not so much what I was expecting. I've done well and managed to get As or above in all the exams I've done so far in A Level (we're doing Death of a Salesman and Othello), but the GCSE grade, albeit quite good, kind of demoralised me and made me think - what if the same thing happens at a level? Also, I want to do law in the future and understand that Biology perhaps isn't all that relevant - is there any point in taking it?

    Any advice would be much appreciated.
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    (Original post by cricinfo)
    Hi
    I'm in year 12 and currently studying A-levels in English Lit, History, Biology and Spanish. The problem is, I'm not really sure which to drop? Previously I saw English Lit as one I would definitely take, as I was getting 8s and 9s in nearly all the practice essays we did in class, and in exam situations. However, in my GCSE I came out with a 7, which I know is still good, but not so much what I was expecting. I've done well and managed to get As or above in all the exams I've done so far in A Level (we're doing Death of a Salesman and Othello), but the GCSE grade, albeit quite good, kind of demoralised me and made me think - what if the same thing happens at a level? Also, I want to do law in the future and understand that Biology perhaps isn't all that relevant - is there any point in taking it?

    Any advice would be much appreciated.
    7 is still an A???
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    (Original post by ExoIceCream99)
    7 is still an A???
    Yeah I know and I'm still pleased with what I got, but it's just that throughout the course I was getting higher (8s and 9s) in the practice essays nearly every time. It just made me think - even if I do great in all the essays throughout the course, I might not live up to it in the real exam, because of the subjectivity of English Lit.
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    I had a similar situation with English to you - I was getting A*s all year and got an A in the end at GCSE. It was really demoralising and I ended up constantly doubting myself at A-Level because of it and I also developed a new hatred for the subject. Recently dropped Lit after doing it for a full year, but I also loved my other subjects way more.
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    If you were getting 8s and 9s before it means you have the ability but maybe chocked in the exam. Plus it's the new a level so a 7 is still amazing! I would probably drop biology as it's very hard and won't help you with law, which English definitely will. What was your bio grade?
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    (Original post by student32610)
    If you were getting 8s and 9s before it means you have the ability but maybe chocked in the exam. Plus it's the new a level so a 7 is still amazing! I would probably drop biology as it's very hard and won't help you with law, which English definitely will. What was your bio grade?
    I managed to get an A* (381/400 UMS) in Biology, but obviously at A-level there's so much more content to learn and the difficulty certainly increases a lot. The thing is, I find the Biology content more interesting than English Lit, and also like the idea that there's a straight answer, rather than an essay which can be interpreted in different ways by different examiners. It's a tricky decision though because in all the essays I've done quite well for English Lit. Decisions, decisions…
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    TBH you already have history which is just as useful for law as English if not more so either bio or English probs won't effect you too much. English is safest for law but Bio will probs get you the better grades and help you meet uni requirements and whatnot. Do whatever youd prefer really, both have pros and cons
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    anyone doing a level edexcel history russia 1917-1991 from lenin to yeltsin ?
    please help
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    Hi,

    I had the same kind of situation, in which I was getting A*s throughout the year and came out with an A in my GCSE, but I took it for A Level anyway, even if I did find it demoralising that I'd suddenly slipped in my exam. I struggled with English Lit in year 12, and I was almost certain that out of my 4 subjects, it would be the one that I dropped - I enjoyed history, politics and psychology more! However, I really found that once I started to embrace the nature of A Levels and really put my all into doing will in them after not doing as well as I'd hoped at GCSE, English Lit suddenly became a favourite and I dropped psychology instead. Like you, I initially preferred psychology to English because there was a straight answer, and it was a case of just learning the content, but I really began to appreciate the nuances and the sophistication of literature and the way it really helped develop my analytical and writing skills. I think it was a good choice to continue with it, I just finished my A Levels and managed an A* in English Lit, in spite of not doing as well at GCSE!

    It really comes down to personal preference. If you're wanting to take law at university, then having at least one essay subject is important as it shows your abilities to think and write analytically, and admissions tutors do favour history for the essay subject, but history and English do complement each other in terms of exam technique and each one can really help with the other. Biology does not directly relate to law no, but if it's a subject you enjoy and know you'll do well in then why not continue with it? Providing you have the subjects required for your degree, admissions tutors really don't express a preference for your other subjects, that's entirely personal, and if you'll meet your offer with subjects you enjoy rather than a standard combination then that's even better!

    See how things go over the next year, and try not to think too much at the moment about which subjects you'll continue with and which you'll drop. It deserves thought yes, but planning too far in advance may cause you to become lethargic in the subject you've decided you're certain on dropping, and it may cause you to view the subject negatively while you're still studying it. It's best to see how this year goes, and see how your thoughts develop and potentially change when you get further through the content. I struggled with the demands of A Level English Lit at first so became set on dropping it by around this time, but it's really best to keep an open mind towards all your subjects and just see how internal and external exams go, and then you can make a decision based on how much you enjoy your subjects balanced with which you think you'll be successful in - both matter in order to get into university! (if that's your plan of course)

    Hope this helps, and I'm sorry for the long ramble if not!!
 
 
 
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