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Are 6 A* no different from 10A* in GCSEs? Watch

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    (Original post by Yaboi)
    There was no need for that, you are just insulting the guy.
    Oh do get over yourself. If you cnat tell the difference between 6 and 10 then there really isnt any hope. Notice how consistent you are when other people said the same. Says a lot about you.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Oh do get over yourself. If you cnat tell the difference between 6 and 10 then there really isnt any hope. Notice how consistent you are when other people said the same. Says a lot about you.
    I find them equally rude and disgusting but you were the easy target, soz.
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    (Original post by Yaboi)
    I find them equally rude and disgusting but you were the easy target, soz.
    [email protected] the outrage. I find the OP equally insulting.
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    (Original post by AryanGh)
    I don't even think you'd get 1A* with that kind of logic.
    You as well, absolutely disgusting.
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    (Original post by GovernmentEarner)
    No, it really doesn't.
    It really does. Intelligent people get A*'s. Not everyone who gets A*s are geniuses, but if you're trying to say that 6A*s = 10A*s, you're lying to yourself.
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    (Original post by Party-P3opl3-9)
    It really does. Intelligent people get A*'s. Not everyone who gets A*s are geniuses, but if you're trying to say that 6A*s = 10A*s, you're lying to yourself.
    I got a 11A*'s @ GCSE, that number really doesn't make me intelligent. If you think you quantify intelligence by a letter given by the government clearly you aren't intelligent.
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    (Original post by veeraxox)
    Does it take the same intelligence to get 6 and 10 A* and please explain why
    intelligence isn't anything for me i believe, It's really how much effort and work you put in that counts:
    you can even be the dummest person in the world, if u work for it nobody will hold you back from your goals.
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    (Original post by GovernmentEarner)
    I got a 11A*'s @ GCSE, that number really doesn't make me intelligent. If you think you quantify intelligence by a letter given by the government clearly you aren't intelligent.
    So you think that the person who just passed with 2 gcse's is just as intelligent as the person who got 10A*s and an A?
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    Both mean very little. GCSEs are piss.
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    (Original post by math42)
    Both mean very little. GCSEs are piss.
    Personally I found GCSEs difficult as f*** (well, obvious not Maths/Sciences/Foreign Language but the other 6 were brutal). I don't know why everyone says they're so easy. Surely if they're as easy as everyone says they are they'd get straight A*s or almost straight A*s, regardless of effort.
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    (Original post by IrrationalRoot)
    Personally I found GCSEs difficult as f*** (well, obvious not Maths/Sciences/Foreign Language but the other 6 were brutal). I don't know why everyone says they're so easy. Surely if they're as easy as everyone says they are they'd get straight A*s or almost straight A*s, regardless of effort.
    Well, I also think A-levels are very easy (except perhaps Chemistry/Physics, though I can only speak directly for the latter). I definitely had to do a lot of rote learning at GCSE, it's not like you can generally just show up and get an a*, but the exams themselves very rarely had challenging questions. I think people are generally not aware enough of syllabi, of the best revision guides/textbooks, and of past papers. If you exploit the resources available to you it's largely a breeze imo. Of course, some people are brighter than others, and are much more likely to do well at GCSE/academically in general, that's a given, but I'd say that strong performance at GCSE is indicative only of above average intelligence and a decent work ethic, rather than any exceptional ability. I'm much more confused by the fact that everybody says that A-levels are some huge jump up. It seems to be objectively accurate based on what I've seen from most people, I knew many who got a bunch of a*s at GCSE and then flopped AS, and typically nobody who had done badly at GCSE did better at A-Level. But in my experience I just didn't have to change what I was doing much to adapt to A-levels. Hell, didn't have to change much to adapt to university. I suppose everyone has different experiences.
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    (Original post by math42)
    Well, I also think A-levels are very easy (except perhaps Chemistry/Physics, though I can only speak directly for the latter). I definitely had to do a lot of rote learning at GCSE, it's not like you can generally just show up and get an a*, but the exams themselves very rarely had challenging questions. I think people are generally not aware enough of syllabi, of the best revision guides/textbooks, and of past papers. If you exploit the resources available to you it's largely a breeze imo. Of course, some people are brighter than others, and are much more likely to do well at GCSE/academically in general, that's a given, but I'd say that strong performance at GCSE is indicative only of above average intelligence and a decent work ethic, rather than any exceptional ability. I'm much more confused by the fact that everybody says that A-levels are some huge jump up. It seems to be objectively accurate based on what I've seen from most people, I knew many who got a bunch of a*s at GCSE and then flopped AS, and typically nobody who had done badly at GCSE did better at A-Level. But in my experience I just didn't have to change what I was doing much to adapt to A-levels. Hell, didn't have to change much to adapt to university. I suppose everyone has different experiences.
    Well yeah A Levels were a total breeze. By the way Chemistry at A Level is very easy, it's the epitome of rote learning. A Levels are only easy/not a step up for those good at particular subjects - most people aren't.

    I 'exploited the resources,' followed syllabi closely and all that stuff and I still found GCSEs very difficult and stressful. I agree about what doing well at GCSEs represents (in my rather anomalous case not work ethic though lol).
    It's just that so many people say they're so ridiculously easy but get only As and Bs which annoys me.
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    (Original post by math42)
    Well, I also think A-levels are very easy (except perhaps Chemistry/Physics, though I can only speak directly for the latter). I definitely had to do a lot of rote learning at GCSE, it's not like you can generally just show up and get an a*, but the exams themselves very rarely had challenging questions. I think people are generally not aware enough of syllabi, of the best revision guides/textbooks, and of past papers. If you exploit the resources available to you it's largely a breeze imo. Of course, some people are brighter than others, and are much more likely to do well at GCSE/academically in general, that's a given, but I'd say that strong performance at GCSE is indicative only of above average intelligence and a decent work ethic, rather than any exceptional ability. I'm much more confused by the fact that everybody says that A-levels are some huge jump up. It seems to be objectively accurate based on what I've seen from most people, I knew many who got a bunch of a*s at GCSE and then flopped AS, and typically nobody who had done badly at GCSE did better at A-Level. But in my experience I just didn't have to change what I was doing much to adapt to A-levels. Hell, didn't have to change much to adapt to university. I suppose everyone has different experiences.
    I assume you didn't do latin or astronomy gcse xD
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    (Original post by Party-P3opl3-9)
    I assume you didn't do latin or astronomy gcse xD
    Nah, the only dead language I did was Welsh.
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    (Original post by IrrationalRoot)
    Well yeah A Levels were a total breeze. By the way Chemistry at A Level is very easy, it's the epitome of rote learning. A Levels are only easy/not a step up for those good at particular subjects - most people aren't.

    I 'exploited the resources,' followed syllabi closely and all that stuff and I still found GCSEs very difficult and stressful. I agree about what doing well at GCSEs represents (in my rather anomalous case not work ethic though lol).
    It's just that so many people say they're so ridiculously easy but get only As and Bs which annoys me.
    Fair enough. If anything I'd imagine so-called soft A-levels like Art or Politics would be pretty horrible to do, especially if aiming for an a*.

    I mean I wouldn't say it wasn't stressful, just that in the exams the questions were generally easy. Wasn't exactly a great time or anything lol.
    Well if people can do very little work and still get a bunch of As and Bs it is still indicative of the GCSEs being too easy. The way I see it, even high-achieving students should think that As and Bs are pretty good. You should have to work hard and understand a lot for an A, and an A* in something should be a sign that you're very very good at it and you put in a lot of time. Instead, for a lot of bright students, As can be obtained by looking through the book the night before and A*s are the consequence of just good revision.
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    (Original post by izzy55555)
    well I got 9 A* at GCSE and my friend (who is practically a genius and is now getting four A* at a level) got 6A*.
    I would not consider myself that clever by any means - I am just a hard worker and am now struggling slightly with A level chem.

    So my answer is - I don't think GCSEs really show intelligence, just work ethic
    thanks
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    (Original post by veeraxox)
    Does it take the same intelligence to get 6 and 10 A* and please explain why
    I got 8A*s and 3As at GCSE. Honestly there could be a slight difference in intelligence it all really depends on where you didn't get those A*s. For me personally it was English/lit/History where I didn't achieve A*s.

    GCSEs are relatively piss easy anyway lmfao I didn't even start year 11 intending to get more than 4 A*s it was just so easy that literally reading through the spec once combined with a decent amount of exam practice was enough to get an A*.

    To be honest GCSE grades don't really reflect intelligence. If you went ahead and looked at the UMS of certain exams such as electronics/physics/mathematics I think you could get a good idea of how "intelligent" someone is.
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    (Original post by IrrationalRoot)
    Well yeah A Levels were a total breeze. By the way Chemistry at A Level is very easy, it's the epitome of rote learning. A Levels are only easy/not a step up for those good at particular subjects - most people aren't.

    I 'exploited the resources,' followed syllabi closely and all that stuff and I still found GCSEs very difficult and stressful. I agree about what doing well at GCSEs represents (in my rather anomalous case not work ethic though lol).
    It's just that so many people say they're so ridiculously easy but get only As and Bs which annoys me.
    math42 Both of you must teach me your ways on how to do A-Levels.
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    (Original post by Black Water)
    math42 Both of you must teach me your ways on how to do A-Levels.
    I wish I could, but I think it's just a case of being naturally comfortable with maths/sciences. Otherwise they're going to be quite hard, even if you're just as good at other subjects. For example someone who's good at Maths will easily get an A* will little to no effort, but someone else who's just as good at Art will really have to work hard for an A* in Art.
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    (Original post by IrrationalRoot)
    I wish I could, but I think it's just a case of being naturally comfortable with maths/sciences. Otherwise they're going to be quite hard, even if you're just as good at other subjects. For example someone who's good at Maths will easily get an A* will little to no effort, but someone else who's just as good at Art will really have to work hard for an A* in Art.
    Yeah that's a good point, I guess I'll have to do whatever I can.
 
 
 
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