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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Stalingrad is seen as the pivotal battle, but you could say he lost a long time before.
    Stalingrad is remembered here.
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    it could easily have gone the other way. the Germans were deeply involved in atomic research but fortunately they did not figure out how to weaponize the fission process.

    https://www.atomicheritage.org/histo...c-bomb-project

    the best atomic scientists were Jewish & for some reason did not hang around the Fatherland for long.
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    (Original post by Hatter_2)
    I disagree. From Germany's perspective it was better to act soon and not wait while the USSR was building up it's military. They had extraordinary success at first in making progress into it.
    Actually they were lucky that Soviets turned out terribly incompetent in commanding, tactics, training and suffering from low morale before the Kremlin realised they have to come back to nationalist rhetorics and ask the orthodox church for support.

    The Barbarossa plan presumed that the Red Army should be knocked out at the very beginning, and this was largely done, only nobody predicted that the Red Army will be able to rebuild itself very quickly and that Soviets have 35 000 tanks and armoured vehicles which were also quickly replaced, often with newer superior models thanks to immense production powers of Russian factories, later evacuated out of range from Luftwaffe, and simplicity of Russian designs which allowed mass scale production on low costs and with unqualified personnel. Hitler did not believe that the Soviets Union could have 10 000 tanks, and look what has happened. Wehrmach had to face 35 000 thousands, quickly replaced with never models which forced the Germans to replace their antitank weapons.

    (Original post by anarchism101)
    The Russian winter is infamous, but less well-known is the impact of the Russian spring - the Wehrmacht thought they'd made it through the winter, only to find the spring rains turned the terrain into a muddy bog. Slows movement of troops and supplies down massively - big problem when your supply lines are already overextended, compounded by the Red Army's scorched earth retreat policy and partisan targeting of supply lines.
    Not to mention that only Soviet tanks were prepared to be mobile on muddy surface. High speed, lower load on surface, lower fuel consumption, simplicity of design and better supply of spare parts and fuel, made the Soviet forces overall more mobile.


    (Original post by the bear)
    it could easily have gone the other way. the Germans were deeply involved in atomic research but fortunately they did not figure out how to weaponize the fission process.

    https://www.atomicheritage.org/histo...c-bomb-project

    the best atomic scientists were Jewish & for some reason did not hang around the Fatherland for long.
    Till the end of the war Germany had no reliable strategic bomber to carry an atomic bomb, not to mention that such bomber would stand next to none chance to get to it's target before being shot down. I even doubt if B-29 could pass hordes of Soviet interceptor fighters. A couple of years after WWII, the Soviets were certain that not a single Tu-4 could survive a flight to America.
 
 
 
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