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Is it true that I am wasting my time studying Law and will have no future? Watch

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    I'm not usually a negative person however I've been hearing a lot of opinions on my future.

    So I was basically raised in another country and came back to live in London on 2011.

    I was supposed to do my GCSEs back then however the school didn't allow me to as my English writing was very bad ( I am English).

    So I ended up doing ESOL which is a course for people who's English isn't their first language.

    Spent two years and then decided to go and retake my GCSEs, I was the only one from my group who got accepted into the course.

    My predicted grades were AAB. On March 2015 my father reserved a letter saying that my child benefit will stop soon and he just decided to kick me out (we don't have a great relationship with him). So things changed. I had to work 42hours voluntery work each week and my college didn't understand my situation, I DROPPED OUT.

    Now after a year I managed to get into university finally doing Law.

    So far I am getting great results and am enjoying my course.

    I felt my life has finally changed however every time I tell my friends I'd like to become a solicitor they make it sounds like it's impossible as I do not have any A-levels or even GCSEs. All I'll have is my degree (and definitely will get experiences while studying).

    Is it possible for me to become a solicitor knowing that I don't have A levels neither money to pay personally for LPC training?

    Is it worth it to get a first class? Because I can do this I just need to know honestly if it is worth it.
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    (Original post by UNSAID)
    I'm not usually a negative person however I've been hearing a lot of opinions on my future.

    So I was basically raised in another country and came back to live in London on 2011.

    I was supposed to do my GCSEs back then however the school didn't allow me to as my English writing was very bad ( I am English).

    So I ended up doing ESOL which is a course for people who's English isn't their first language.

    Spent two years and then decided to go and retake my GCSEs, I was the only one from my group who got accepted into the course.

    My predicted grades were AAB. On March 2015 my father reserved a letter saying that my child benefit will stop soon and he just decided to kick me out (we don't have a great relationship with him). So things changed. I had to work 42hours voluntery work each week and my college didn't understand my situation, I DROPPED OUT.

    Now after a year I managed to get into university finally doing Law.

    So far I am getting great results and am enjoying my course.

    I felt my life has finally changed however every time I tell my friends I'd like to become a solicitor they make it sounds like it's impossible as I do not have any A-levels or even GCSEs. All I'll have is my degree (and definitely will get experiences while studying).

    Is it possible for me to become a solicitor knowing that I don't have A levels neither money to pay personally for LPC training?

    Is it worth it to get a first class? Because I can do this I just need to know honestly if it is worth it.
    It is possible. You need to explain your circumstances when applying though, and it's probably worthwhile contacting firms beforehand and seeing whether they will consider your application.

    I know of a couple of lawyers who trained at MC firms who had no A-levels. The GCSEs won't really matter at all.

    How did you get into uni? Was it through an Access Course or significant work experience?
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    It is possible. You need to explain your circumstances when applying though, and it's probably worthwhile contacting firms beforehand and seeing whether they will consider your application.

    I know of a couple of lawyers who trained at MC firms who had no A-levels. The GCSEs won't really matter at all.

    How did you get into uni? Was it through an Access Course or significant work experience?
    Thank you for your reply.

    I Applied to uni as a mature student and explained my situation they did contact my teacher and all my work/school references were great.
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    (Original post by UNSAID)
    Thank you for your reply.

    I Applied to uni as a mature student and explained my situation they did contact my teacher and all my work/school references were great.
    Then I would be using those same references as back-up evidence for applications you are making.

    My key bit of advice is just that you need to be a bit more proactive in connecting with the employers before you apply to them. Whether its for your own benefit of saving time by working out which firms not to apply to, or if it is more a case of impressing the firm by meeting them in question, that bit of interaction, whether by email, telephone call or networking face-to-face could pay dividends.
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    I second what J-SP says about connecting with firms. I was at a networking event with a global firm recently and they went to great lengths to emphasise the work environment and personality of their firm and how a successful applicant would find the firm a "good fit" for themselves as much as the firm would find the applicant a good fit for them.

    Lawyers are highly respected in society. There's always a reason not to do something. Stick with it. Your background you have described shows character - which is so important. Let's say you supplement that with a First class degree - a firm may very well help you financially with the LPC course (although this depends on what firm you apply to).
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    (Original post by aidangranada)
    I second what J-SP says about connecting with firms. I was at a networking event with a global firm recently and they went to great lengths to emphasise the work environment and personality of their firm and how a successful applicant would find the firm a "good fit" for themselves as much as the firm would find the applicant a good fit for them.

    Lawyers are highly respected in society. There's always a reason not to do something. Stick with it. Your background you have described shows character - which is so important. Let's say you supplement that with a First class degree - a firm may very well help you financially with the LPC course (although this depends on what firm you apply to).
    Thank you, this is great to know. I am also thinking about finding an Online A Level course so If I can financially afford it I might go for it.
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    (Original post by UNSAID)
    Thank you, this is great to know. I am also thinking about finding an Online A Level course so If I can financially afford it I might go for it.
    I wouldn't bother. Just focus on getting great results in your degree. Having no GCSEs or A'levels (but explaining the situation) is probably better than having mediocre ones.
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    (Original post by UNSAID)
    Thank you, this is great to know. I am also thinking about finding an Online A Level course so If I can financially afford it I might go for it.
    I agree with the poster above, I wouldn't recommend diving into an A-level course. If you did it, you'd need to do three at the same time, and that's tough going if you have other major commitments like a degree.

    Time could be better spent getting good grades and building up the rest of your CV.
 
 
 
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