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    (Original post by Juliamarie9)
    What utter nonsense that a 2:2 is below standard! What planet are you on?
    Sorry that I interrupt you, but I have no idea what "2:2" means? I can't say something to your statement without to know the details.
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    I'm torn in view here.

    Like someone else said, a degree shouldn't be just a degree. If that were the case, generally grading at all would be a concept no one should abide by.

    A degree, like other grades, is how you filter people at the door. At least for jobs that need a quick and easy way of assuming competency.

    Experience however, is what keeps you going, and can take you up and up and up.

    I can certainly say that a handful of people I went to university with who got 1st degrees definitely wouldn't be suited for a plethora of jobs in the field their degree is focused on. After all, a degree says you're wonderful in an academic world.

    However. Having a degree to a high standard generally does suggest that the person is dedicated to working and has a good work ethic academically. Now these can be highly transferable skills depending on the area, or it could be a transferable attitude.
    That's why it's quite a good gauge of person. That degree does speak volumes, but maybe just 1 or 2 volumes. The rest has to be supplemented and fueled by good old experience.
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    Sorry that I interrupt you, but I have no idea what "2:2" means? I can't say something to your statement without to know the details.
    For clarification, a '2:2', is a grading of a degree. See it as a B (or C if you consider a First an A*).

    The grading generally goes: Failed, Pass, Third [class], 2:2 (Lower 2nd class), 2:1 (Upper 2nd Class), and First [class].

    2:2 is equivalent to about 50-60%
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    (Original post by shameful_burrito)
    No one said life is fair. But it's understandable. The best people get the best jobs.
    I disagree. The best people don't necessarily get the best job. The people perhaps with the higher degree but that doesn't necessarily mean that they are the best people for the job.
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    (Original post by Sykeology)
    For clarification, a '2:2', is a grading of a degree. See it as a B (or C if you consider a First an A*).

    The grading generally goes: Failed, Pass, Third [class], 2:2 (Lower 2nd class), 2:1 (Upper 2nd Class), and First [class].

    2:2 is equivalent to about 50-60%
    I see, it is quite below average. It is difficult accordingly to get a job with this degree. I am so confusing why degrees for students at school are rated in letters, while degrees for students at university are indicated with numbers in a relation to each other.
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    I see, it is quite below average. It is difficult accordingly to get a job with this degree. I am so confusing why degrees for students at school are rated in letters, while degrees for students at university are indicated with numbers in a relation to each other.
    To add to the confusion, Master's courses (though this may not apply to every institution), go: Pass (Low, Med, High), Merit/Credit/Commendation (Low, Med, High) and Distinction (Low, Med, High). There is a grade above that, it's still considered a distinction but to a near-flawless level for the resource and level of academia. It generally represents 90% or above, and at that standard you're viable to be considered for publication.

    I don't know what level of academia you're at right now, but if you're not quite to university yet, I would say to take the grading with a pinch of sugar. Whilst 70%+ being a 2:1/distinction may seem moderate in comparison to the 80s and 90s of GCSE and possibly A-level, I can assure you that the standard to reach 70 is proportionally higher than 80/90 in lower tiers of education.

    Hopefully that's informative (:
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    (Original post by Sykeology)
    To add to the confusion, Master's courses (though this may not apply to every institution), go: Pass (Low, Med, High), Merit/Credit/Commendation (Low, Med, High) and Distinction (Low, Med, High). There is a grade above that, it's still considered a distinction but to a near-flawless level for the resource and level of academia. It generally represents 90% or above, and at that standard you're viable to be considered for publication.

    I don't know what level of academia you're at right now, but if you're not quite to university yet, I would say to take the grading with a pinch of sugar. Whilst 70%+ being a 2:1/distinction may seem moderate in comparison to the 80s and 90s of GCSE and possibly A-level, I can assure you that the standard to reach 70 is proportionally higher than 80/90 in lower tiers of education.

    Hopefully that's informative (:

    I am not a university student, I am not a British who is living in UK, but abroad. Know the Education system in Britain a little bit, that is all. And it is higely unlikely I would ever be a student in the UK. As an outsider I just wonder why this module is so complicated.
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    I am not a university student, I am not a British who is living in UK, but abroad. Know the Education system in Britain a little bit, that is all. And it is higely unlikely I would ever be a student in the UK. As an outsider I just wonder why this module is so complicated.
    From the foundation of universities in the 12th century, the idea was that a student undertook a series of oral exercises in arts (as a result of which he was awarded the "gradium" or degree of batchelor of arts. He continued studying and received the degree of master of arts which qualified him to teach arts. He then continued to study one of the higher faculties medicine, civil law, canon law and theology and received a bachelor's degree in one of those faculties and finally he received a doctor's degree in one of those faculties which entitled him to teach in those faculties.

    The histories of European universities diverged from the Renaissance and Reformation onwards. In England, the oral examination exercises became meaningless formalities.

    Proper written examinations only started at the beginning of the 19th century and only only for students wanting "honours", Those examinations were divided into different classes (3 classes at Cambridge and 4 at Oxford) and originally the students were ranked in order. Only two subject were offered classics (being mostly classical history and philosophy) and mathematics.

    Over the 19th century, more and more examinations were introduced (including for those not seeking honours) along with other subjects for examination. The University of London was very important in the development of degrees because it first awarded the degrees in the higher faculties as first degrees and revived masters degrees as a taught qualification.

    During the 20th century there were a number of developments. Reading for an ordinary non-honours or "pass" degree died out and "pass" was left as the grade fro someone who fails to get any class of honours in an honours examination. Oxford dropped its by now rarely awarded 4th class degree in 1971. The vast majority of students were getting 2nd class degrees and so progressively universities started dividing their second class degrees into "second class upper division" or "second class first division" or "2:1" degrees and "second class lower division" or "second class second division" or 2:2 degrees. Oxford was the last to divide its 2nd in 1986.

    What has happened since is that there has been a massive increase in the proportion of students getting 2:1 degrees so that the proportion of 2:2 degrees awarded is the same now as the numbers of 3rds awarded 30 years ago. There are numerous threads on TSR arguing the reasons fro this.

    Due to the European Bologna process and the size of the Commonwealth, the English method of awarding degrees is now dominant throughout the world except in the USA. Many European countries have abandoned their own centuries old traditions in the last 20 years.

    Ideas have always moved from country to country. The PhD is a German invention. It is not an historic doctorate.

    This is a broad outline. There are still anomalies in all countries including in England.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
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    A great respect and thanks to you to write the whole development of English education up in this extension. I still wonder whether there are intentions in Britain to reform the degrees. A reform to adapt the module for another European countries.
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    A great respect and thanks to you to write the whole development of English education up in this extension. I still wonder whether there are intentions in Britain to reform the degrees. A reform to adapt the module for another European countries.
    Yes, there are people here who wish to adopt the American grade point average system.

    There are two major weaknesses. It is no better than the British system for dealing with differential marking at different institutions or on different courses; and it dilutes the effect of improvement over time and so encourages people who make a poor start to drop out rather than improve.
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    (Original post by Juliamarie9)
    Again, what planet you on? I'm a boss with a 1st with masters too! My staff are 2:2 and more functional than my 4 males who have a 1st! People need to "back up" their skills without academia involved. Get in the real world mate!
    He's someone who doesn't live in the real world. Or ever held down a job (espec that dumb comment about being a CEO - I'm laffing so hard at that).

    A person with no degree who've worked himself up from junior level to management is more valuable to a company than an idiot with a 1st because he has a rich dad but no work experience.
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    a 2.2 is a good thing
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    (Original post by Juliamarie9)
    What utter nonsense that a 2:2 is below standard! What planet are you on?
    It does make it difficult to continue studying, getting a job or going into a graduate scheme. If I wish to join the British Psychological Society, I believe I have to have a 2:1 and above. Masters can be strict on the degree classification as well.

    If you only want a degree because you enjoy the subject and don't need it to further yourself or your career, then no, it's not a problem. For most people, it is a problem though.

    The percentage is pretty low for a 2:2 or below, which means they didn't perform that well. It seems though that your issue is that a degree class doesn't determine someone's abilities or intelligence, which is correct. Someone with a high class may not perform well in a work environment because they have been so focused on studies but can you really blame them?
    However, there are graduates with a first who have worked through their degree and/or have work experience before they begun their studies.

    I agree that a degree is a degree and whatever the class, it takes hard work and lots of dedication, but the classification is important to many graduates. Everyone has different goals that require different requirements.
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    It's still a degree yes, but it can limit your options dependant on the classification, in the same way that an A-level is an A-level, but the result you get can affect which universities will accept you.
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    (Original post by hannxm)
    It does make it difficult to continue studying, getting a job or going into a graduate scheme. If I wish to join the British Psychological Society, I believe I have to have a 2:1 and above. Masters can be strict on the degree classification as well.

    If you only want a degree because you enjoy the subject and don't need it to further yourself or your career, then no, it's not a problem. For most people, it is a problem though.

    The percentage is pretty low for a 2:2 or below, which means they didn't perform that well. It seems though that your issue is that a degree class doesn't determine someone's abilities or intelligence, which is correct. Someone with a high class may not perform well in a work environment because they have been so focused on studies but can you really blame them?
    However, there are graduates with a first who have worked through their degree and/or have work experience before they begun their studies.

    I agree that a degree is a degree and whatever the class, it takes hard work and lots of dedication, but the classification is important to many graduates. Everyone has different goals that require different requirements.
    I'm fairly sure you just need an eligible psychology degree to join the BPS, regardless of grade
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    (Original post by bones-mccoy)
    I'm fairly sure you just need an eligible psychology degree to join the BPS, regardless of grade
    I'm not sure entirely. I know the degree has to be accredited, but I swear someone said that you need a decent grade.
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    (Original post by hannxm)
    I'm not sure entirely. I know the degree has to be accredited, but I swear someone said that you need a decent grade.
    I don't think so cause I got a 2.2 in my conversion course and I'm a member
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    (Original post by bones-mccoy)
    I don't think so cause I got a 2.2 in my conversion course and I'm a member
    Well that's one less thing for me to worry about!
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