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    Is there anyone who has successfully done this? Please would you share your experience? My child is very unhappy and suffering from anxiety at LSE.
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    If she/he does want to transfer, you need to speak to other universities ASAP. Some may have places in clearing, allowing your child to go straight onto that course, but they may not be able to get any on campus accommodation. If they're not happy, the best thing to do in my opinion (and what I'm doing) is to take a gap year, so start applying through ucas again now, decide what university is best for you, and apply there. They can then get a job/volunteer, building up useful skills and experience, and it also gives them plenty of time to begin preparing for university. You'll need to speak to their school/college about reapplying to ucas through them, as it makes it easier for them to add a reference.
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    I've seen your post on the Uni Life forum - what a terrible situation to be in. It's clear you're very worried about your child and it must be so frustrating to feel like there's not that much you can do to help. Unfortunately universities are very reluctant to speak to parents - there are data protection concerns so only limited topics can be discussed, and part of the university experience is learning to take responsibility for yourself. That said, it's awful to watch your child being so unhappy. I've had a bit of experience of LSE so thought I'd try to offer my 2p.

    In terms of big decisions, so long as they are okay in the short term I'd encourage them to hang on til reading week then spend a couple of days at home having a think through what they'd like to do once they're away from the pressure cooker and well rested.

    Options include:
    Carry on this year
    Its worth going to see the SU adviser and the study advisers at LSE Life. They are more sympathetic and better equipped to help struggling students than the academics. They can advise about ways to catch up - there are drop-in quant sessions, facilitated study groups and various other things happening, but students need to ask about them. Often students find their peers more helpful than the tutors running office hours so if they haven't yet made many study-orientated friends this could be a good place to start.

    Also check their course choices - if they've scrapped into Year 2 he should be on the easier of the two options courses and hopefully has chosen an outside option that feels manageable.

    If he decides to carry on he will have a tough year - its is hard work at the best of times and if child is already on the back foot I can understand there's only time for work and sleep. It's definitely possible to go to another university and get a good degree with less work so they need to have a think about what's important to them: getting the LSE degree with a tough year this year or going somewhere else where they can have more of a relaxed approach. Hopefully what they might have learnt from last year is that sustained work throughout the year pays off when it comes to exam time.

    The SU adviser can signpost to the counselling service and things like that.


    Course change:
    Lots of students find LSE undergrad economics far more mathematical than they were expecting. If it's that side they are finding hard but they want to stay at LSE more generally, they could look at moving to something like Management or Accounting and Finance that have more of a balance of quant and qual courses. The SU adviser should be able to advise on the options for changing course - it's not guaranteed the departments will agree to it, but they might.


    Interrupting:
    A good intermediate option might be to interrupt. This is a one year pause of studies, giving them time to think. If they decided they wanted to return to LSE they could use the year to catch up or they might be able to come back to a course change. I'm not 100% sure of the rules but I think they could also use the interruption year to make inquiries and apply to some other universities. The SU adviser should be able to advise on financial implications of interrupting at this stage.

    Drop out/transfer:
    I'm afraid it probably is a bit late to find a new university to move to this year. If they have the grades to get in to LSE then they will certainly find somewhere else to take them, but they might need to start again from year 1. Depending on how badly they've done in their first year they might be able to move into Year 2 but they'll need to email a few universities and find out whether or not they would be considered. it sounds like after a bit of a horrible year then some time out might not be the worst idea in world anyway.

    Hopefully that's helpful. It's awful they're having a bad time and if they want to leave LSE for a fresh start that makes total sense. At least they're lucky to have a very caring parent looking out for them! Best of luck, remember to take care of yourself too.
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    Thanks very much for such comprehensive info. I'll update shortly on decisions made for the purposes of informing anyone else struggling. Thanks all.
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    (Original post by Madmummy)
    Thanks very much for such comprehensive info. I'll update shortly on decisions made for the purposes of informing anyone else struggling. Thanks all.
    What was your son/daughter struggling with? Do you feel as if it was LSE-specific, or something related to the wider industry? (i.e. Econ students being Econ students and applying super early for work experience, vac schemes, committee positions, etc).

    I don't know if you have already come to a decision, but I know someone who struggled last year with balancing his academic workload and working part-time. He dropped out before exams and re-applied through Clearing to another university for another course (got an offer within a few days). He seems happier now.
 
 
 
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