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Swapping squats for leg press Watch

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    Hi everyone,

    I had an accident recently which injured my neck and now it causes me pain when I squat but it doesnt when I leg press. I have asked others to critique my form and they say it is mostly fine except I could do with a bit more depth so I dont think it is my form that is the issue

    I have googled it and some people say it is fine to swap then 1 for 1 but a fair few have said you need to swap squat for leg press + something else but then never actually specify what that is

    Anyone got any opinions on what to swap squat with? ie just straight swap it for leg press or do leg press + something else?


    My routine on the days I squat is (I do a A and B full body work out 3 times a week)
    1. Squat
    2. dumb bell bench press
    3. seated cable rows
    4. face pulls
    5. tricep pushdowns
    6. ab work

    Thanks
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    Try front squat instead of back squat, may relieve that pressure on your neck.
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    As above. I'd also advise something like a hack squat machine as opposed to a standard leg press, as most of the latter don't work the glutes to any great degree.
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    thanks guys, I will give the front squat a go
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    I wouldn't be so bothered about lack of glute work if you deadlift but, if front squats don't work out, you go for machines then I'd add in a bit of extra core work
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    If you want to work on squat form trying using some progressive exercises, e.g. start of with wall squats to focus on improving trunk and back stability/control, then progress onto goblet squats with a box and move the box lower to increase mobility then try without the box then progress onto front squats

    You can try front squats instead of back squats as this will relieve the press on the neck, try progressive exercises first to work on form etc and develop movement first if you have an injury as you don't want to jump right into squats and then make the injury worse (not that you are doing that), hope this helps, even if your form is fine its still a useful tool to use or know
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    Forget squats, use the leg press. I've heard the press DOESN'T bulk up your waist, which is vital to creating the strongest V taper possible, and thus the best appearance. Also, if your legs get too big you won't be able to wear stylish jeans anymore, which is unacceptable in my opinion. As long as you can keep your legs proportionate so you don't look ridiculous, you're golden.
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    (Original post by RockyDennis)
    Forget squats, use the leg press. I've heard the press DOESN'T bulk up your waist, which is vital to creating the strongest V taper possible, and thus the best appearance. Also, if your legs get too big you won't be able to wear stylish jeans anymore, which is unacceptable in my opinion. As long as you can keep your legs proportionate so you don't look ridiculous, you're golden.
    Bulk up waist? Wat

    Don't get big legs because jeans - wat
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    (Original post by Angry cucumber)
    Bulk up waist? Wat

    Don't get big legs because jeans - wat
    Squatting hits your obliques, which thickens your midsection. Built obliques look nice, the shape of the muscle is pleasing, but not at the cost of even marginally reducing V taper. Remember you're in clothes 99% of the time. How you look in a tight fitting tee and jeans is the most important.
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    (Original post by RockyDennis)
    Squatting hits your obliques, which thickens your midsection. Built obliques look nice, the shape of the muscle is pleasing, but not at the cost of even marginally reducing V taper. Remember you're in clothes 99% of the time. How you look in a tight fitting tee and jeans is the most important.
    V taper is entirely genetics and fat levels, its very hard to get massive obliques or nigh on impossible without the genetics or being a bear.

    Plus you shouldn't even be mildly concerned of V taper until you're years into the game
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    If you give up the squat then deadlifting has to be added in or you're going to miss out on working important muscles in your posterior chain. You need a good morning excersise to work lower back and you may even need to add hamstring excersises as well.All in all it shouldn't be too mucg of an issue in the short term if you're just taking a break from squating due to your injury, but it could cause muscular imbalance in the long term and result in chronic back pain if you're lifting and missing something as important as lower back out.
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    (Original post by Angry cucumber)
    V taper is entirely genetics and fat levels, its very hard to get massive obliques or nigh on impossible without the genetics or being a bear.

    Plus you shouldn't even be mildly concerned of V taper until you're years into the game
    You should be concerned from the very beginning about your body proportions, you should know what you want to build and why. Somebody with wide hips for example would want to ESPECIALLY concerned about their taper and how they will develop it.

    For most men, they should focus on building lats and lateral delts while ensuring zero oblique work, this will give the illusion of a stronger taper. I also feel like big legs in general can detract from the apparent width of the upper body, so just work to keep them proportionate. As long as your legs aren't noticeably underdeveloped compared to the rest of your body, that's enough.

    During pre-steroid era bodybuilding, a lot of work was put into creating the illusion of size in desired areas by keeping certain muscles small. Traps for example, to make the upper body seem broader. I don't like the look of flat traps though personally, so I train those.

    I believe standard deadlifts also use obliques as stabilizing muscles.
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    (Original post by RockyDennis)
    You should be concerned from the very beginning about your body proportions, you should know what you want to build and why. Somebody with wide hips for example would want to ESPECIALLY concerned about their taper and how they will develop it.

    For most men, they should focus on building lats and lateral delts while ensuring zero oblique work, this will give the illusion of a stronger taper. I also feel like big legs in general can detract from the apparent width of the upper body, so just work to keep them proportionate. As long as your legs aren't noticeably underdeveloped compared to the rest of your body, that's enough.

    During pre-steroid era bodybuilding, a lot of work was put into creating the illusion of size in desired areas by keeping certain muscles small. Traps for example, to make the upper body seem broader. I don't like the look of flat traps though personally, so I train those.

    I believe standard deadlifts also use obliques as stabilizing muscles.
    Anything that involves your core engages your obliques. Have fun not engaging your core by just doing machines and suffering recurrent back injuries. Trying to look like someone on low dose roids as anything other than a late intermediate to advanced lifter is absurd
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    (Original post by Angry cucumber)
    Anything that involves your core engages your obliques. Have fun not engaging your core by just doing machines and suffering recurrent back injuries. Trying to look like someone on low dose roids as anything other than a late intermediate to advanced lifter is absurd
    Aside from isolation oblique work, it's those two exercises that are harsh on the waist width. That's why I don't do them. They're very replaceable exercises.



    You can do the exercises with a belt, but you'd look ridiculous doing less than roider weights with a powerlifter belt.
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    Try weighted glute bridges or goblet squats
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    (Original post by RockyDennis)
    Aside from isolation oblique work, it's those two exercises that are harsh on the waist width. That's why I don't do them. They're very replaceable exercises.



    You can do the exercises with a belt, but you'd look ridiculous doing less than roider weights with a powerlifter belt.
    ur missing out on the two best exercises for leg gains
    why do u care so much about the waist width? they're not going to make ur waist absolutely massive dude-I think u got ur priorities wrong
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    (Original post by angrypoliceman)
    ur missing out on the two best exercises for leg gains
    why do u care so much about the waist width? they're not going to make ur waist absolutely massive dude-I think u got ur priorities wrong
    Shoulder-to-waist and shoulder-to-hip ratios are extremely important.

    I don't recommend you (and couldn't bring myself to) risk ratios when there are other exercises that can build legs and lower back. Having big "gains" in legs is irrelevant, you just need to keep legs proportionate and developed enough so if you wear shorts at the beach you don't look stupid. That's all they're good for.

    Show muscles are more important for looking good in clothing.
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    (Original post by RockyDennis)
    Shoulder-to-waist and shoulder-to-hip ratios are extremely important.

    I don't recommend you (and couldn't bring myself to) risk ratios when there are other exercises that can build legs and lower back. Having big "gains" in legs is irrelevant, you just need to keep legs proportionate and developed enough so if you wear shorts at the beach you don't look stupid. That's all they're good for.

    Show muscles are more important for looking good in clothing.
    ur just trolling at this point
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    (Original post by angrypoliceman)
    ur just trolling at this point
    What of that do you disagree with? Keep in mind I only lift weights to look good, not to impress other men online or in the gym.

    It sounds like OP is the same and wants a nice physique, therefore he can absolutely swap squats for leg press with no detriment. It would only be a problem if he wanted to compete at powerlifting meets.
 
 
 
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