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    I'm currently in year 12 and doing Maths, Physics and History A Level. I am loving physics and history but I'm finding maths very boring and I have a really crap teacher who is not getting through the work quick enough. The deadline for changing or swapping a levels at my school was last week (6/10/17) and so I'm stuck. I'm really interested in geography and couldn't take it because of option blocks at my school.
    I would love to do something related to geography and or physics at uni, does anyone know of good courses related to them don't require geography or a good maths grade?
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    (Original post by student32610)
    I'm currently in year 12 and doing Maths, Physics and History A Level. I am loving physics and history but I'm finding maths very boring and I have a really crap teacher who is not getting through the work quick enough. The deadline for changing or swapping a levels at my school was last week (6/10/17) and so I'm stuck. I'm really interested in geography and couldn't take it because of option blocks at my school.
    I would love to do something related to geography and or physics at uni, does anyone know of good courses related to them don't require geography or a good maths grade?
    You should probably try economics if it is an option, it involves some parts of geography as it teaches you about the economy of different places in the world
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    (Original post by student32610)
    I'm currently in year 12 and doing Maths, Physics and History A Level. I am loving physics and history but I'm finding maths very boring and I have a really crap teacher who is not getting through the work quick enough. The deadline for changing or swapping a levels at my school was last week (6/10/17) and so I'm stuck. I'm really interested in geography and couldn't take it because of option blocks at my school.
    I would love to do something related to geography and or physics at uni, does anyone know of good courses related to them don't require geography or a good maths grade?
    You should stick w/ maths because it helps your physics especially if you take it further
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    (Original post by internet monster)
    You should probably try economics if it is an option, it involves some parts of geography as it teaches you about the economy of different places in the world
    I'm
    I can't really change my options at this point but I'll look into it... do you know if unis like it?

    (Original post by Reece.W.J)
    You should stick w/ maths because it helps your physics especially if you take it further
    Is it still useful it even if I do badly in it?
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    Yes, but if your main problem is finding Maths boring, then its probably the way you revise. Whenever I don't feel like revising off a textbook i just watch videos on that subject on youtube. Trust me it is wayyy more entertaining
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    Fab, thanks i'll try that!
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    (Original post by student32610)
    I'm currently in year 12 and doing Maths, Physics and History A Level. I am loving physics and history but I'm finding maths very boring and I have a really crap teacher who is not getting through the work quick enough. The deadline for changing or swapping a levels at my school was last week (6/10/17) and so I'm stuck. I'm really interested in geography and couldn't take it because of option blocks at my school.
    I would love to do something related to geography and or physics at uni, does anyone know of good courses related to them don't require geography or a good maths grade?
    The thing I'm a bit worried about is that you say you find maths boring. If this is actually true (and it's not just because of underwhelming teaching) then that basically takes any physics-related degree out of the question because all of them will be very maths-heavy, much more so than A Level.

    If you do still like the idea of doing a physics-related degree, you might want to look into doing geophysics which is basically the application of physics to the earth. Geophysics courses will generally require A Levels in Maths and Physics, so you'd qualify for that.

    A lot of Geography courses don't actually require an A-Level in Geography. Even though it's probably unusual to apply for a degree in Geography without an A Level in the subject, if you can demonstrate interest in the subject through reading and other things then you could definitely make a competitive application. You will probably be more interested in applying for a Geography BSc rather than a BA if you'd like to keep the natural science aspect.
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    The thing I'm a bit worried about is that you say you find maths boring. If this is actually true (and it's not just because of underwhelming teaching) then that basically takes any physics-related degree out of the question because all of them will be very maths-heavy, much more so than A Level.

    If you do still like the idea of doing a physics-related degree, you might want to look into doing geophysics which is basically the application of physics to the earth. Geophysics courses will generally require A Levels in Maths and Physics, so you'd qualify for that.

    A lot of Geography courses don't actually require an A-Level in Geography. Even though it's probably unusual to apply for a degree in Geography without an A Level in the subject, if you can demonstrate interest in the subject through reading and other things then you could definitely make a competitive application. You will probably be more interested in applying for a Geography BSc rather than a BA if you'd like to keep the natural science aspect.
    Do you think it would be worth self teaching myself AS Geography or will universities accept me without it? (my dad is a geography teacher so he can help me). Also I just find Maths A Level too abstract, I enjoy physics because the numbers mean something at the end, whereas maths is numbers for the sake of numbers. I don't really know what a career in physics is like, do you think I won't like the maths side from what I said above?
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    (Original post by student32610)
    Do you think it would be worth self teaching myself AS Geography or will universities accept me without it? (my dad is a geography teacher so he can help me). Also I just find Maths A Level too abstract, I enjoy physics because the numbers mean something at the end, whereas maths is numbers for the sake of numbers. I don't really know what a career in physics is like, do you think I won't like the maths side from what I said above?
    If you're concerned, email some Geography departments you'd be interested. However, if Geography isn't a required subject, there will be a reason for that. As long as you can demonstrate that you've got an interest in Geography (e.g. by reading around the subject, attending lectures, etc.) and that you've got a broadly scientific background if you're applying for a BSc, I think you will be able to make a competitive application.

    Regarding physics, it's pretty difficult to judge. Doing a geophysics-heavy course at university, you definitely need to be confident in your mathematical ability to do well on and enjoy the course. I think the mathematics I do now is a lot more interesting than the maths I studied at A Level because you're applying it to really interesting problems, but there's no way of avoiding the fact that there is a lot of mathematics involved. So it's a judgement you're going to need to make. As I say, I think geophysics is a very good compromise between pure physics and geography, but if the idea of spending a lot of time in front of equations gives you nightmares then I'd say geography is probably the safer option.
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    (Original post by student32610)
    I'm currently in year 12 and doing Maths, Physics and History A Level. I am loving physics and history but I'm finding maths very boring and I have a really crap teacher who is not getting through the work quick enough. The deadline for changing or swapping a levels at my school was last week (6/10/17) and so I'm stuck. I'm really interested in geography and couldn't take it because of option blocks at my school.
    I would love to do something related to geography and or physics at uni, does anyone know of good courses related to them don't require geography or a good maths grade?
    Dont do physics (or things that use physics like engineering, geophysics etc) if you hate maths, as that it is the foundations of physics
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    If you're concerned, email some Geography departments you'd be interested. However, if Geography isn't a required subject, there will be a reason for that. As long as you can demonstrate that you've got an interest in Geography (e.g. by reading around the subject, attending lectures, etc.) and that you've got a broadly scientific background if you're applying for a BSc, I think you will be able to make a competitive application.

    Regarding physics, it's pretty difficult to judge. Doing a geophysics-heavy course at university, you definitely need to be confident in your mathematical ability to do well on and enjoy the course. I think the mathematics I do now is a lot more interesting than the maths I studied at A Level because you're applying it to really interesting problems, but there's no way of avoiding the fact that there is a lot of mathematics involved. So it's a judgement you're going to need to make. As I say, I think geophysics is a very good compromise between pure physics and geography, but if the idea of spending a lot of time in front of equations gives you nightmares then I'd say geography is probably the safer option.
    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    Dont do physics (or things that use physics like engineering, geophysics etc) if you hate maths, as that it is the foundations of physics
    What I struggle with maths is that it's abstract and numbers for the sake of numbers. In physics and geophysics the application of maths appeals to me as it's numbers for a solution. Does that sound like enough of an interest or will the maths be too much in your experience? thanks so much you've been so helpful, much appreciated!!
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    (Original post by student32610)
    What I struggle with maths is that it's abstract and numbers for the sake of numbers. In physics and geophysics the application of maths appeals to me as it's numbers for a solution. Does that sound like enough of an interest or will the maths be too much in your experience? thanks so much you've been so helpful, much appreciated!!
    I don't know how good you are at maths. If you feel like you're good at maths and would be happy spending a lot of time doing it if it's applied to interesting stuff (which it is) then I think you'll be fine. But as I say, there are less maths-intensive geoscience options such as Earth Sciences and Geology degrees if that's something you'd be interested in. Geoscience is a great field so I'd definitely look into it!
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    (Original post by student32610)
    What I struggle with maths is that it's abstract and numbers for the sake of numbers. In physics and geophysics the application of maths appeals to me as it's numbers for a solution. Does that sound like enough of an interest or will the maths be too much in your experience? thanks so much you've been so helpful, much appreciated!!
    If you can't do the maths on its own without application you wont be able to do when its mixed into a problem. It doesn't get eaiser when it is in a problem, you use the same methods of solving the maths as if you would in a regular maths module. If anything I would say you need to understand the maths before applying it to physics to understand the physics (though in some cases applying it does make the maths clearer but you still need to be able to do the maths first). It would be like trying to walk/run before you even knew how to stand up

    Imo I believe ANYONE can learn the maths required for a specific degree but you need to want to spend the time learning it and understanding it. I do theoretical physics at uni but got a C in GCSE maths AND NEARLY ALWAYS struggle at first with whatever new maths I am learning at the time but I just want to improve so I took the time to learn how to do that. I am yet to find a piece of maths that I think some people could never learn.

    A lot of the time maths is hard and frustrating for most people but thats fine, just keep at it and you'll get it eventually

    If you find maths boring etc then thats fine but you won't enjoy something like physics as there is so much of it in the degree (physics A-level is nothing like a physics degree)
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    (Original post by student32610)
    I'm currently in year 12 and doing Maths, Physics and History A Level. I am loving physics and history but I'm finding maths very boring and I have a really crap teacher who is not getting through the work quick enough. The deadline for changing or swapping a levels at my school was last week (6/10/17) and so I'm stuck. I'm really interested in geography and couldn't take it because of option blocks at my school.
    I would love to do something related to geography and or physics at uni, does anyone know of good courses related to them don't require geography or a good maths grade?
    You won’t be able to do anything Physics related at uni without maths. Basically there are complex calculations to do and you won’t be able to do them without a level Maths. Well, unless you’re some kind of genius.
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    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    If you can't do the maths on its own without application you wont be able to do when its mixed into a problem. It doesn't get eaiser when it is in a problem, you use the same methods of solving the maths as if you would in a regular maths module. If anything I would say you need to understand the maths before applying it to physics to understand the physics (though in some cases applying it does make the maths clearer but you still need to be able to do the maths first). It would be like trying to walk/run before you even knew how to stand up

    Imo I believe ANYONE can learn the maths required for a specific degree but you need to want to spend the time learning it and understanding it. I do theoretical physics at uni but got a C in GCSE maths AND NEARLY ALWAYS struggle at first with whatever new maths I am learning at the time but I just want to improve so I took the time to learn how to do that. I am yet to find a piece of maths that I think some people could never learn.

    A lot of the time maths is hard and frustrating for most people but thats fine, just keep at it and you'll get it eventually

    If you find maths boring etc then thats fine but you won't enjoy something like physics as there is so much of it in the degree (physics A-level is nothing like a physics degree)
    How much harder does maths get in a physics degree? I know that a level physics is gcse maths standard so is degree physics a level standard or harder? Thanks so much that was so good!!
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    I don't know how good you are at maths. If you feel like you're good at maths and would be happy spending a lot of time doing it if it's applied to interesting stuff (which it is) then I think you'll be fine. But as I say, there are less maths-intensive geoscience options such as Earth Sciences and Geology degrees if that's something you'd be interested in. Geoscience is a great field so I'd definitely look into it!
    Thank you i'm definitely going to look into geoscience as it sounds like more of what i'm looking for. sorry to keep asking questions but will it be similar career options from a geoscience degree to a geophysics degree?
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    (Original post by student32610)
    How much harder does maths get in a physics degree? I know that a level physics is gcse maths standard so is degree physics a level standard or harder? Thanks so much that was so good!!
    A-level standard + more

    Stuff covered in a standard physics degree that is IOP accredited (so standard across most physics courses) (some of it is actually covered to a certain extent in further maths)

    - Calculus
    - complex numbers
    - ordinary differential equations (various orders and methods of solving them)
    - vector calculus, fields, grad, div, curl etc
    - calculus of multivaribles in several different coordinate systems
    - fourier series and fourier
    - divergence theorem
    - linear algebra
    - partial differential equations
    - fourier transforms

    All of this is learnt to varying degrees of depth, some to further maths standard but a good amount of it is beyond that. I wouldnt say it is harder than further maths, it is either just different or builds on top of it

    I have also used all of the maths above to a certain degree in physics problems (some bits only once, some all the time). You can also avoid some of this maths after covering it in the maths modules by staying away from certain bits of physics

    If you can handle a maths alevel (which I believe everyone can) then you have the ability to handle all the maths above if you work at it imo but if you find maths boring AND struggle to put enough time in to understand it then you will be setting yourself up to fail

    Depending on the uni you may cover some of the above in more depth, from a proof stand point or cover more maths (also depending on what modules you take at uni)

    What you personally find easy and difficult will depend on you, I personally struggle with PDEs but I find linear algebra very easy but I know people who are the opposite
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    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    A-level standard + more

    Stuff covered in a standard physics degree that is IOP accredited (so standard across most physics courses) (some of it is actually covered to a certain extent in further maths)

    - Calculus
    - complex numbers
    - ordinary differential equations (various orders and methods of solving them)
    - vector calculus, fields, grad, div, curl etc
    - calculus of multivaribles in several different coordinate systems
    - fourier series and fourier
    - divergence theorem
    - linear algebra
    - partial differential equations
    - fourier transforms

    All of this is learnt to varying degrees of depth, some to further maths standard but a good amount of it is beyond that. I wouldnt say it is harder than further maths, it is either just different or builds on top of it

    I have also used all of the maths above to a certain degree in physics problems (some bits only once, some all the time). You can also avoid some of this maths after covering it in the maths modules by staying away from certain bits of physics

    If you can handle a maths alevel (which I believe everyone can) then you have the ability to handle all the maths above if you work at it imo but if you find maths boring AND struggle to put enough time in to understand it then you will be setting yourself up to fail

    Depending on the uni you may cover some of the above in more depth, from a proof stand point or cover more maths (also depending on what modules you take at uni)

    What you personally find easy and difficult will depend on you, I personally struggle with PDEs but I find linear algebra very easy but I know people who are the opposite
    thank you so much, a lot to think about from that but you have really helped me so thank you!
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    (Original post by student32610)
    Thank you i'm definitely going to look into geoscience as it sounds like more of what i'm looking for. sorry to keep asking questions but will it be similar career options from a geoscience degree to a geophysics degree?
    There will be differences. Geophysics degrees might potentially unlock more options because it's more maths-heavy than a more traditional geology degree , but generally speaking they will unlock the same kind of options, yeah. For most jobs, stuff like internships and transferable skills are more important than your degree subject anyway.
 
 
 
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