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    E.g. things like best programming languages to learn, best side projects to do, best extra things to learn at home including things like activities and good societies to join?

    Thanks!
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    (Original post by Kira Yagami)
    E.g. things like best programming languages to learn, best side projects to do, best extra things to learn at home including things like activities and good societies to join?

    Thanks!
    There's not really any such thing. A CV is written for a specific job, so the best CV for a tester role is not much like the best CV for a Python role or a Database role.

    You need to make sure that you have a decent balance of evidence of technical skills and soft skills. You need to begin to look at what sort of CS job interests you and then read around and understand what is happening in that area (is it cloud computing, high performance computing, big data etc).
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    In general, just get as much programming experience as possible - make some projects of your own so that you can talk about some relevant ones when you apply for jobs, and maybe learn a couple of languages or something else which will help (e.g. if Python is your main language then you might find it beneficial to get familiar with the Django framework)
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    (Original post by Kira Yagami)
    E.g. things like best programming languages to learn, best side projects to do, best extra things to learn at home including things like activities and good societies to join?

    Thanks!
    side projects
    hackathons
    technical experience

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    There's no right or wrong answer in terms of how to construct a good CV. Things that I've found that have worked are some of the following:

    Keep it succinct. 2 pages is really about as long as I'd go. Try to keep it within that. 3 starts to be a little excessive.

    Mention everything that's relevant experience-wise. Try to list all the things you've done in terms of projects and work experience which you can actually make directly relevant. For example, if you've worked in a shop, make sure you explain that your role included working as a team, being delegated responsibilities. That kind of thing. It doesn't have to be strictly computing related, but it's about using the opportunity to show you have skills which could be interdisciplinary and therefore applicable within any potential computing roles.

    List your skills. I genuinely found an increase in people contacting me when I made a table on my CV which has my 8 core skills, prettily laid out. Your *main* areas of interest or expertise. Whether it's a framework, language, software or whatever, pick a few and lay them out in a non-boring way on your CV.

    Use a master copy. Cannot stress this enough. A CV should be tailored for a role. Make a master CV that perhaps lists *all* of your skills, or mentions your main interest. Save this as a master copy. Then make new copies, tweaked specifically for a role that you're applying for. You want a CV to best reflect your suitability for one specific role, and this is made far easier by editing a master CV to a job-specific copy.

    Use LinkedIn. Actively. Recruiters are super interested in LinkedIn. Keep it up to date, and link to it on your CV and job applications. Add it to your email signature. Whatever it takes. Get *you* over to the recruiter as well as possible. That's how to stand out.

    It goes without saying all of this is anecdotal, and ultimately what makes or breaks a good CV is entirely subjective. But that would be my tuppence-worth.
 
 
 
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