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    Hi I am in a bit of a dilemma I do not know whether to go for Bristol or LSE for law.
    LSE is more prestigious and I feel as if I would be unwise to go to LSE if I were to get the offer. That being said, I've heard a lot of negative things about LSE and I am looking to enjoy my uni experience as I am a social person.

    Bristol is also a very good uni and good for law as well as having one of the best social scenes in the country as I am told. I have also heard it is easier to get a first at Bristol than at LSE where getting a first is extremely hard.

    Is the trade off between prestige/reputation and social scene for LSE worth it. From what I've gathered there is not much of a difference between the actual unis, and it depends on what you do at uni that counts, but I still want to go to the best uni for me.

    Context: I am also considering doing a masters after my undergraduate degree. I'm keeping my options open but I am not too sure I want to work in law. Right now I'm planning on studying law (as it interests me) and then specialising in a field in my masters. That is why I was thinking wouldn't a first at bristol better be in this respect, as opposed to a 2:1 at LSE.

    Just wanted different opinions. Thanks
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    _Fergo might have an opinion about this.
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    I am in a similar situation except for economics at Bristol (have an offer) vs Warwick (waiting)
    Warwick for economics is world class and will open so many doors. But I also want to enjoy my uni experience as you only have those three years once you know. Warwick can be dead as it is a campus uni surrounded by fields and was named as one of the most boring campuses in the U.K. (Exeter York and Durham are the other ones). Bristol is Bristol and I loved it so much.
    I think do what your heart tells you to do. Go on LinkedIn or just Google where most associates come from to make sure Bristol is targeted. The name of your university is important but what you do there is even more important. A happy furfiled person with a 1st from Bristol with a load of extracurricular activities > a 2.1 from LSE with a person who felt like they have missed out on three fun years just for the prestige. Another point the Bristol law building is beautiful just saying
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    You are splitting hairs. Bristol's reputation and LSE's reputation cannot be distinguished. Don't buy in to the TSR nonsense. If a law firm had an application from a Bristol student and an LSE student in front of them, they would not break a tie based on university attended (they're recruiting the person, not the university).

    When we did our TC recruitment this year, the institution that candidates attended did not get mentioned (no, not even once, it is that irrelevant). The only reason for the statistics in the link below (and you'll see that Bristol does better than LSE) is down to law firms picking the best students, and there are patterns to where the best students choose to go to university. We don't differentiate based on university choice!

    http://www.chambersstudent.co.uk/whe...d-universities

    If you want to go to Bristol (and it sounds from your post like you do) then go! You will enjoy it more, do better in the end, and will look back on your university days with far more fondness, than if you select a university that you only like because of some miniscule perceived prestige.

    Remember that in Bristol the halls of residence are close to the uni, whereas the London universities' accommodation is spread all over the place. That will inevitably affect your ability to participate in clubs & societies and other social things, and you have stated that this is important to you.

    You need to visit both. The choice of university won't affect your legal career prospects in any way, but you will get a better feel for where you would like to spend the next three years, and which location will suit you personally.

    Personally when I was looking at universities I refused to touch London universities, and only looked outside London. I knew that London was not where I wanted to be a student, and that was the right choice for me.
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    (Original post by TakingMyTimeOnMy)
    I think do what your heart tells you to do. Go on LinkedIn or just Google where most associates come from to make sure Bristol is targeted. The name of your university is important but what you do there is even more important. A happy furfiled person with a 1st from Bristol with a load of extracurricular activities > a 2.1 from LSE with a person who felt like they have missed out on three fun years just for the prestige. Another point the Bristol law building is beautiful just saying
    This is what I'm afraid of being. I feel like I will be so annoyed if I were to go LSE and work hard just to be working next to someone who really enjoyed their uni experience and we are in the same spot.

    But at the same time I don't want to regret not going to LSE and wasting a better opportunity for me because I was scared about the environment. It's really conflicting lol.
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    (Original post by Crumpet1)
    If you want to go to Bristol (and it sounds from your post like you do) then go! You will enjoy it more, do better in the end, and will look back on your university days with far more fondness, than if you select a university that you only like because of some miniscule perceived prestige.

    Remember that in Bristol the halls of residence are close to the uni, whereas the London universities' accommodation is spread all over the place. That will inevitably affect your ability to participate in clubs & societies and other social things, and you have stated that this is important to you.
    These two points are ones which I have been considering quite a lot. I feel that being in London is a problem as being in London people are all focused on their own thing and it doesn't really have that 'university feel'.

    There is a lot of emphasis on prestige however with TSR and people around me that are also applying to law which also makes me have doubts about whether I would be wasting an opportunity. Thanks a lot for your advice though, it is really appreciated in this confusing time.
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    (Original post by isjfaodf)
    This is what I'm afraid of being. I feel like I will be so annoyed if I were to go LSE and work hard just to be working next to someone who really enjoyed their uni experience and we are in the same spot.

    But at the same time I don't want to regret not going to LSE and wasting a better opportunity for me because I was scared about the environment. It's really conflicting lol.
    But it's not a better opportunity. Why on earth do you think it would be?
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    (Original post by Crumpet1)
    But it's not a better opportunity. Why on earth do you think it would be?
    From what I've gathered the 'brand name' is important in picking a uni. That is why I feel a lot of people want to go to oxbridge, because it looks very impressive on your CV, rather than because they have a love for academic rigour. LSE is undoubtedly up there with oxbridge, and so that is why I feel like it could be a waste of opportunity.
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    (Original post by isjfaodf)
    This is what I'm afraid of being. I feel like I will be so annoyed if I were to go LSE and work hard just to be working next to someone who really enjoyed their uni experience and we are in the same spot.

    But at the same time I don't want to regret not going to LSE and wasting a better opportunity for me because I was scared about the environment. It's really conflicting lol.
    I can 100% guarantee you that this will happen. Training contract cohorts are made up of people from a wide range of universities (I'd estimate at least 20 unis were represented in my MC cohort). If you choose a university based solely on what a bunch of 18 year old TSRians tell you they think is prestigious, then you will end up working side by side with people (a majority in fact) who had the sense to choose their university based on other considerations, and had a better time as a consequence.
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    (Original post by isjfaodf)
    From what I've gathered the 'brand name' is important in picking a uni. That is why I feel a lot of people want to go to oxbridge, because it looks very impressive on your CV, rather than because they have a love for academic rigour. LSE is undoubtedly up there with oxbridge, and so that is why I feel like it could be a waste of opportunity.
    'Brand name' is irrelevant between Bristol and LSE, they are equals.

    I would argue with 'undoubtedly' too, it really isn't. Bristol and LSE are indistinguishable for law.
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    I’ve been at LSE for about four weeks now, and I love it. I know people talk about it being really unsocial, but my experience has been the opposite of that.

    I think it does depend what Hall you’re in - Passfield and Carr-Saunders are universally regarded as the friendliest, because they’re catered, so you have dinner with everyone every day and brunch on Saturdays; they’re undergraduate only & they’re relatively small, so you know or at least recognise pretty much everyone.

    The 2nd year halls committee are great at organising socials before everyone heads out for the night, which in freshers were great for meeting everyone in halls. They’ve also organised quizzes & open mic nights.

    People went out every night in freshers, and lots of people are still going out at least once or twice a week.

    So regarding the social side at LSE, it is what you make of it. If you want to go out lots, you’ll find people who want to go with you; if you don’t, there are lots of non alcoholic events too. So don’t be put off going to one of the best unis for law in the country by the ‘rubbish social life’ rumour, because I can tell you that it hasn’t been my experience at all.
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    (Original post by isjfaodf)
    From what I've gathered the 'brand name' is important in picking a uni. That is why I feel a lot of people want to go to oxbridge, because it looks very impressive on your CV, rather than because they have a love for academic rigour. LSE is undoubtedly up there with oxbridge, and so that is why I feel like it could be a waste of opportunity.
    Lol no it's not, not for law or for anything else, oxbridge is in a league of its own
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    (Original post by isjfaodf)
    Hi I am in a bit of a dilemma I do not know whether to go for Bristol or LSE for law.
    LSE is more prestigious and I feel as if I would be unwise to go to LSE if I were to get the offer. That being said, I've heard a lot of negative things about LSE and I am looking to enjoy my uni experience as I am a social person.

    Bristol is also a very good uni and good for law as well as having one of the best social scenes in the country as I am told. I have also heard it is easier to get a first at Bristol than at LSE where getting a first is extremely hard.

    Is the trade off between prestige/reputation and social scene for LSE worth it. From what I've gathered there is not much of a difference between the actual unis, and it depends on what you do at uni that counts, but I still want to go to the best uni for me.

    Context: I am also considering doing a masters after my undergraduate degree. I'm keeping my options open but I am not too sure I want to work in law. Right now I'm planning on studying law (as it interests me) and then specialising in a field in my masters. That is why I was thinking wouldn't a first at bristol better be in this respect, as opposed to a 2:1 at LSE.

    Just wanted different opinions. Thanks
    LSE isn't known for Law. It's known for its world-class economics course. LSE is 14th in the UK when it comes to the percentage of trainees by university. Here's the source. Whereas Bristol is 5th, and has been as high as 3rd.

    Bristol is a better university for Law specifically. The course itself may not appeal to you, as some people have had some complaints (like Fergo). However, there is no doubt as to which university is better for Law. LSE has better general prestige, but for course-specific prestige, Bristol tops it.

    The two universities are negligible in prospects anyway - you'll be set going to either uni.
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    (Original post by Pidge Gunderson)
    LSE isn't known for Law. It's known for its world-class economics course. LSE is 14th in the UK when it comes to the percentage of trainees by university. Here's the source. Whereas Bristol is 5th, and has been as high as 3rd.

    Bristol is a better university for Law specifically. The course itself may not appeal to you, as some people have had some complaints (like Fergo). However, there is no doubt as to which university is better for Law. LSE has better general prestige, but for course-specific prestige, Bristol tops it.

    The two universities are negligible in prospects anyway - you'll be set going to either uni.
    https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/member.php?u=1591005

    Mediocre GCSEs.
    Bad AS grades.
    Good A2 grades.

    Studying at the University of Bristol!
    Bit of a clue as to why you think Bristol is better than LSE for law. While I won't get into the LSE vs Oxbridge debate, there is absolutely no doubt LSE is a world-leader for law (not just economics) and definitely superior to Bristol in terms of the quality of academics. The point about the number of trainees from each university is superficial as Bristol has a much larger student body.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/member.php?u=1591005



    Bit of a clue as to why you think Bristol is better than LSE for law. While I won't get into the LSE vs Oxbridge debate, there is absolutely no doubt LSE is a world-leader for law (not just economics) and definitely superior to Bristol in terms of the quality of academics. The point about the number of trainees from each university is superficial as Bristol has a much larger student body.
    I admit that LSE is a superior university to Bristol. That's a fact.

    I do think Bristol is up for contention as one of the best universities for Law and stands together with LSE as some of the top universities for Law in the UK. The university makes up a a very high percentage of trainees. I can't make a judgement about the quality of academics, you'd have to go to someone who actually has studied at both universities; though I must admit that some people have had problems with Law at Bristol and the way the course is ran.

    Bristol does have a much larger student body because it offers far more courses. The discrepancy for Law is less (albeit still there). Nevertheless, I do feel that there's a negligible difference between LSE and Bristol for Law. It's not for no reason that Bristol make up such a high percentage of Law trainees.
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    (Original post by Pidge Gunderson)
    I admit that LSE is a superior university to Bristol. That's a fact.

    I do think Bristol is up for contention as one of the best universities for Law and stands together with LSE as some of the top universities for Law in the UK. The university makes up a a very high percentage of trainees. I can't make a judgement about the quality of academics, you'd have to go to someone who actually has studied at both universities; though I must admit that some people have had problems with Law at Bristol and the way the course is ran.

    Bristol does have a much larger student body because it offers far more courses. The discrepancy for Law is less (albeit still there). Nevertheless, I do feel that there's a negligible difference between LSE and Bristol for Law. It's not for no reason that Bristol make up such a high percentage of Law trainees.
    Indeed, it is not for no reason. It is because Bristol has a larger student body.
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    Dunno tbh.

    The difference in reputation will not make a single bit of difference in training contract/postgraduate applications provided your A-Levels are good.

    I've heard bad things about LSE academically, but it really wouldn't be worse than Bristol. The difference is that at LSE you'll have four modules (all exams at first), whereas at Bristol you'll have six modules (first year, 5 exams -one of which introductory- and two coursework essays).

    Socially it's what you make it. Don't listen to the LSE doomsayers.

    I'd say go to LSE for the (slightly?) better reputation. Wouldn't personally recommend Bristol to anyone.
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    (Original post by isjfaodf)
    This is what I'm afraid of being. I feel like I will be so annoyed if I were to go LSE and work hard just to be working next to someone who really enjoyed their uni experience and we are in the same spot.

    But at the same time I don't want to regret not going to LSE and wasting a better opportunity for me because I was scared about the environment. It's really conflicting lol.
    Being in this position acc sucks but lmk what you pick!!! Where else are you applying ??
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    (Original post by _Fergo)
    Wouldn't personally recommend Bristol to anyone.
    Why not, if I may ask
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    (Original post by mjustliving)
    Why not, if I may ask
    Way too much work which makes it difficult to focus on anything else without compromising your grades. They know and do mention from time to time that 6 modules are too much, but they think we love having 'choice' - in reality, the choices are limited too, and instead you're stuck with a huge workload on topics you're not really into.

    Mental support is weak although they're investing 1m extra into it.

    Classes are too large. Whilst the seminar and tutorial groups are normal, you can tell they're struggling to organise everything.

    The city is great though, and many, many employers visit for talks, interview tips and whatnot.
 
 
 
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