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School is forcing me to drop a level chemistry... Watch

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    (Just to let you know, I'm in year 12, and I moved to a different school for sixth form, which has outstanding results, I got 2 As in my chemistry exams)

    For my a levels I'm doing: bio, chem, history (and polish, although I won't count it in). I tried out maths a level, but since everyone is genius in my new maths class, I felt pressured and decided to drop it.

    About a week ago, our assistant head teacher told me that I should drop chemistry. I didn't exactly understand why, and never got a good enough reason for it. She gave a few "reasons"

    a) my terrible initial exam results (In week 3, we had an mini practice a level exam)

    Firstly, I got 50% on my exam. It was my first ever a level exam though! Our teacher hasn't even taught us any a level exam skills. Personally, I think that getting 50% on an 'a level exam' is good for me, especially when I've been only in the course for 2 weeks. I know overall it's not a very good grade, but my exam is literally in less than 2 years. I think the highest % someone got was 67 anyway. They can't just drop me after one exam result, can they?

    b) I "haven't done" any of my homework

    I have done all my homework given. My chem teacher said there was an issue with my account and my progress was somehow deleted? (suspicious tbf) But since the points still stay, on the leaderboard, I'm still on the first place, meaning that I've done the most work out of my chemistry class.

    c) I don't have a "talent" or the "skill" to do chemistry

    Once again, not a valid excuse. I may not be that good in chemistry as all the other students (let me remind you, that school is one of the best in the area), but I'm quite certain that skills are learnt, not inherited. If I lack certain skills, then my teacher should simply try to teach me them. (Also, I only did double, and most of my class did triple, which may be why I lack skill)

    My head teacher made me do psychology a level, which I don't enjoy. Some bits are interesting, but I have already missed quite a lot of content and do not want to quickly learn all of it to catch up with the rest of the students. The other day I asked the head teacher if I'm able to finally drop psychology, but she said that we'll "talk about it" on Monday. Although I'm 99% sure she'll make me do psychology anyway.

    My teacher let me do chemistry for another few weeks, I've been pre-reading from my chemistry textbook (which we have finally received), and tbh, I'm improving, especially in practicals. I'm trying my best, although there wasn't much I could do in a period of a 2 weeks. I'm afraid to ask or participate in lessons now, because I'm scared that if I say something wrong they'll want to drop me. Same thing is with my homework, when I don't get something right, I get anxious about them using it as an reason for me to drop.

    I know that chemistry a level is one of the hardest a levels there is, but I'm willing to put in the work. Our assistant headteacher told me that with my skills, I won't get anywhere above a E. (very harsh) That really made me lose my motivation...


    Any tips/advice?
    Thank you so much for reading.
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    If you feel you can get that A or A* and you school is unfairly forcing you, then find a way to persuade them. If they're lying about your progress bring your parents in and talk to the head master/mistress. If they won't budge then try to find a way to take it out of school.
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    (Original post by VirgoStrain)
    If you feel you can get that A or A* and you school is unfairly forcing you, then find a way to persuade them. If they're lying about your progress bring your parents in and talk to the head master/mistress. If they won't budge then try to find a way to take it out of school.
    Thank you! I have an chem test on Monday, so I'll try my best and tried to persuade them with hopefully a better result than 50. (:
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    Chemistry A Level is much more difficult than GCSE Chemistry. I got an A* in GCSE Chemistry and struggled massively at A Level because it's such a huge step up and a lot more intense than the years before. Everyone struggles in the first month or two but you slowly start getting used to the workload and detail the course is in, my teacher was deliberately harsh to the class in the first couple of weeks because she wanted to weed out the people who wanted to mess about and wouldn't put any effort in. 50% is reasonable for your first ever A Level test after only studying a subject at that level for 2 weeks, it's not like you got a U and failed completely.

    I'd say to speak to your teacher directly about it and explain what's happening, she will have a much better idea of how you're doing than the assistant head.
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    there's no way you should be made to drop it after 50 percent in the first exam. people have got Es and Us in their first exam and have gone on to get As. a level style questions take a bit of getting used to !
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    (Original post by bones-mccoy)
    Chemistry A Level is much more difficult than GCSE Chemistry. I got an A* in GCSE Chemistry and struggled massively at A Level because it's such a huge step up and a lot more intense than the years before. Everyone struggles in the first month or two but you slowly start getting used to the workload and detail the course is in, my teacher was deliberately harsh to the class in the first couple of weeks because she wanted to weed out the people who wanted to mess about and wouldn't put any effort in. 50% is reasonable for your first ever A Level test after only studying a subject at that level for 2 weeks, it's not like you got a U and failed completely.

    I'd say to speak to your teacher directly about it and explain what's happening, she will have a much better idea of how you're doing than the assistant head.
    Thank you so much! I feel better knowing that other people also found it difficult at first. Speaking to my chem teacher rather then our assistant head is also great idea (:
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    (Original post by marika572)
    Thank you! I have an chem test on Monday, so I'll try my best and tried to persuade them with hopefully a better result than 50. (:
    Your academic future is more important than the constraints the school puts on you. And if it does end up you have to do it out of school, prove them wrong. There's nothing more satisfying than watching their jaws drop as you bring them a grade they never dreamed you could achieve. There's been lots of these kinds of people.
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    (Original post by jonjoshelvey21)
    there's no way you should be made to drop it after 50 percent in the first exam. people have got Es and Us in their first exam and have gone on to get As. a level style questions take a bit of getting used to !
    That's very true, they're very different than GCSE questions. Thanks for the motivation!
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    (Original post by marika572)
    Thank you so much! I feel better knowing that other people also found it difficult at first. Speaking to my chem teacher rather then our assistant head is also great idea (:
    I only achieved an A at chemistry GCSE, but my overall results were 10 A* and 3 A - i fell asleep during chem revision the night before the exam, bad luck for me. Anyway, like you I did terribly on my first test - 57%, the lowest of the class, whose average was something like 70%. But I'm not worried, because when I properly go over the textbook I'll ace the upcoming tests.
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    (Original post by marika572)
    (Just to let you know, I'm in year 12, and I moved to a different school for sixth form, which has outstanding results, I got 2 As in my chemistry exams)

    For my a levels I'm doing: bio, chem, history (and polish, although I won't count it in). I tried out maths a level, but since everyone is genius in my new maths class, I felt pressured and decided to drop it.

    About a week ago, our assistant head teacher told me that I should drop chemistry. I didn't exactly understand why, and never got a good enough reason for it. She gave a few "reasons"

    a) my terrible initial exam results (In week 3, we had an mini practice a level exam)

    Firstly, I got 50% on my exam. It was my first ever a level exam though! Our teacher hasn't even taught us any a level exam skills. Personally, I think that getting 50% on an 'a level exam' is good for me, especially when I've been only in the course for 2 weeks. I know overall it's not a very good grade, but my exam is literally in less than 2 years. I think the highest % someone got was 67 anyway. They can't just drop me after one exam result, can they?

    b) I "haven't done" any of my homework

    I have done all my homework given. My chem teacher said there was an issue with my account and my progress was somehow deleted? (suspicious tbf) But since the points still stay, on the leaderboard, I'm still on the first place, meaning that I've done the most work out of my chemistry class.

    c) I don't have a "talent" or the "skill" to do chemistry

    Once again, not a valid excuse. I may not be that good in chemistry as all the other students (let me remind you, that school is one of the best in the area), but I'm quite certain that skills are learnt, not inherited. If I lack certain skills, then my teacher should simply try to teach me them. (Also, I only did double, and most of my class did triple, which may be why I lack skill)

    My head teacher made me do psychology a level, which I don't enjoy. Some bits are interesting, but I have already missed quite a lot of content and do not want to quickly learn all of it to catch up with the rest of the students. The other day I asked the head teacher if I'm able to finally drop psychology, but she said that we'll "talk about it" on Monday. Although I'm 99% sure she'll make me do psychology anyway.

    My teacher let me do chemistry for another few weeks, I've been pre-reading from my chemistry textbook (which we have finally received), and tbh, I'm improving, especially in practicals. I'm trying my best, although there wasn't much I could do in a period of a 2 weeks. I'm afraid to ask or participate in lessons now, because I'm scared that if I say something wrong they'll want to drop me. Same thing is with my homework, when I don't get something right, I get anxious about them using it as an reason for me to drop.

    I know that chemistry a level is one of the hardest a levels there is, but I'm willing to put in the work. Our assistant headteacher told me that with my skills, I won't get anywhere above a E. (very harsh) That really made me lose my motivation...


    Any tips/advice?
    Thank you so much for reading.
    Maybe because the school wants to try and do what’s best for you (and them of course) but after 1st test is too soon tbh. I got an E (40%) in my 1st maths test recently and I’m not being kicked out. However, I’m dropping maths because it’s not for me but the point is they’re not kicking me off
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    (Original post by VirgoStrain)
    Your academic future is more important than the constraints the school puts on you. And if it does end up you have to do it out of school, prove them wrong. There's nothing more satisfying than watching their jaws drop as you bring them a grade they never dreamed you could achieve. There's been lots of these kinds of people.
    If they still won't let me continue chemistry, I will end up moving schools. I'd love to prove them wrong, that'll be amazing Thank you so much, I will be thinking about those words when I'll revise.
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    (Original post by Reece.W.J)
    Maybe because the school wants to try and do what’s best for you (and them of course) but after 1st test is too soon tbh. I got an E (40%) in my 1st maths test recently and I’m not being kicked out. However, I’m dropping maths because it’s not for me but the point is they’re not kicking me off
    That's what I was thinking. I feel like they care more about the perfect school a level results rather then what the students want

    I hope you feel better about dropping maths, (since you said it wasn't for you) (:
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    (Original post by VirgoStrain)
    I only achieved an A at chemistry GCSE, but my overall results were 10 A* and 3 A - i fell asleep during chem revision the night before the exam, bad luck for me. Anyway, like you I did terribly on my first test - 57%, the lowest of the class, whose average was something like 70%. But I'm not worried, because when I properly go over the textbook I'll ace the upcoming tests.
    Those results are amazing! And oh gosh poor you, 57% is still good though. Me and 2 other people got 50%, one of them left school since they made him drop chem and bio :/ the other one got away with it.. somehow.

    Yes that's the spirit. I'm sure you'll do great!
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    (Original post by marika572)
    That's what I was thinking. I feel like they care more about the perfect school a level results rather then what the students want

    I hope you feel better about dropping maths, (since you said it wasn't for you) (:
    Thank you 😊 I’ll be picking up geography (lots to catch up) but as we both said there is competition between students across the nation for high grades but most of all between the schools (I think it’s to do with funding )
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    (Original post by Reece.W.J)
    Thank you 😊 I’ll be picking up geography (lots to catch up) but as we both said there is competition between students across the nation for high grades but most of all between the schools (I think it’s to do with funding )
    No problem, you'll do great in geography.

    Guess that's why, wish they cared more about their students than the rivalry between other schools
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    (Original post by marika572)
    (Just to let you know, I'm in year 12, and I moved to a different school for sixth form, which has outstanding results, I got 2 As in my chemistry exams)

    For my a levels I'm doing: bio, chem, history (and polish, although I won't count it in). I tried out maths a level, but since everyone is genius in my new maths class, I felt pressured and decided to drop it.

    About a week ago, our assistant head teacher told me that I should drop chemistry. I didn't exactly understand why, and never got a good enough reason for it. She gave a few "reasons"

    a) my terrible initial exam results (In week 3, we had an mini practice a level exam)

    Firstly, I got 50% on my exam. It was my first ever a level exam though! Our teacher hasn't even taught us any a level exam skills. Personally, I think that getting 50% on an 'a level exam' is good for me, especially when I've been only in the course for 2 weeks. I know overall it's not a very good grade, but my exam is literally in less than 2 years. I think the highest % someone got was 67 anyway. They can't just drop me after one exam result, can they?

    b) I "haven't done" any of my homework

    I have done all my homework given. My chem teacher said there was an issue with my account and my progress was somehow deleted? (suspicious tbf) But since the points still stay, on the leaderboard, I'm still on the first place, meaning that I've done the most work out of my chemistry class.

    c) I don't have a "talent" or the "skill" to do chemistry

    Once again, not a valid excuse. I may not be that good in chemistry as all the other students (let me remind you, that school is one of the best in the area), but I'm quite certain that skills are learnt, not inherited. If I lack certain skills, then my teacher should simply try to teach me them. (Also, I only did double, and most of my class did triple, which may be why I lack skill)

    My head teacher made me do psychology a level, which I don't enjoy. Some bits are interesting, but I have already missed quite a lot of content and do not want to quickly learn all of it to catch up with the rest of the students. The other day I asked the head teacher if I'm able to finally drop psychology, but she said that we'll "talk about it" on Monday. Although I'm 99% sure she'll make me do psychology anyway.

    My teacher let me do chemistry for another few weeks, I've been pre-reading from my chemistry textbook (which we have finally received), and tbh, I'm improving, especially in practicals. I'm trying my best, although there wasn't much I could do in a period of a 2 weeks. I'm afraid to ask or participate in lessons now, because I'm scared that if I say something wrong they'll want to drop me. Same thing is with my homework, when I don't get something right, I get anxious about them using it as an reason for me to drop.

    I know that chemistry a level is one of the hardest a levels there is, but I'm willing to put in the work. Our assistant headteacher told me that with my skills, I won't get anywhere above a E. (very harsh) That really made me lose my motivation...


    Any tips/advice?
    Thank you so much for reading.

    If I was you, I'd plead my case. Gather evidence about your account and discuss how much effort/revision you are putting into chemistry. Chemistry is really stressful and difficult at A-level, I understand as I've just started too.
    However, all my teachers are supportive and understand the gap from GCSE to A level.

    If I was you, I'd ask for a meeting with both the Head and anyone else trying to make you drop it and your parents/guardians. It's not fair and you should be able to be listened to, like a human being.
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    I'm doing A2 chemistry and I know that for the majority of year 12, people were averaging 50% in most of the tests. It's way too early to drop out when you're still getting used to the massive step up and the increased work load. The work does get harder but coping with it gets a lot easier
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    Hi! I'm a year 13 chemistry student, and I got A's at GCSE and now I'm predicted an A. I had a really rocky start in chemistry since if I'm honest I didn't really care for it and only took it as it is necessary for medicine (not applying for medicine anymore but yeah). It was so much more intense to start with in the first month than my other courses and I didn't like it at all and wanted to drop out. My teacher was rude and doubted me ('are you sure you can do this?' 'its going to be very tough for someone like you to get a B') but that just pushed me on to work harder. After a few poor test results in the first term I pushed back and now I'm doing pretty good, and I honestly love the subject and I'm fascinated by it.
    You have one less set back than me as I can already tell that you want to do the subject and have a developing passion for it. Now you need to prove your teachers wrong, do it not only for yourself but to spite them!! A levels take a lot of work, it's almost impossible to move from gcse and then ace the first few a level style tests as everything is completely different and you need to adjust not only to the content but the style of questions. With practise, I know you'll be able to do it fine!
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    sounds like she's more worried about how your mark will potentially affect her school league table position than your actual welfare as a student.........
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    (Original post by lalliboo)
    If I was you, I'd plead my case. Gather evidence about your account and discuss how much effort/revision you are putting into chemistry. Chemistry is really stressful and difficult at A-level, I understand as I've just started too.
    However, all my teachers are supportive and understand the gap from GCSE to A level.

    If I was you, I'd ask for a meeting with both the Head and anyone else trying to make you drop it and your parents/guardians. It's not fair and you should be able to be listened to, like a human being.
    Thank you so much! I'm having a meeting about this tomorrow, and I'll ask my parents to come if they won't listen. Good luck with chemistry (:
 
 
 
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