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    I do chemistry maths and economics but find maths really hard and don’t believe I can perform well in the exam no matter how much practice I do. Do you think it’s too late to change? I think my school will still let me. I want to do economics so is maths required for good unis maybe LSE? I’m thinking of changing to geography and this will be a good choice for economics. What do you guys think and can you help me decide please
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    its pretty late in the day. why not just take up geography and study 4, im guessing this is AS level
    also maths gets easier the more practise you do, you might regret dropping it.
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    (Original post by Reece.W.J)
    I please
    do I have to quote you so you can see I replied?
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    (Original post by angrypoliceman)
    its pretty late in the day. why not just take up geography and study 4, im guessing this is AS level
    also maths gets easier the more practise you do, you might regret dropping it.
    We do Welsh bacc as well so I’d be doing 5 then
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    I'm sure maths is essential for economics at most uni. the key to maths is practise practise practise. However i believe it is not too late to drop.
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    (Original post by Reece.W.J)
    We do Welsh bacc as well so I’d be doing 5 then
    **** welsh bacc and youre only doing 4 :P
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    (Original post by angrypoliceman)
    **** welsh bacc and youre only doing 4 :P
    It’s compulsory but I wish I could
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    If you find maths hard, are you sure economics at university is for you? Maths is quite a big part of economics
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    (Original post by Queenie123)
    If you find maths hard, are you sure economics at university is for you? Maths is quite a big part of economics
    Yeah but only like stats, nowhere near as hard
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    (Original post by Reece.W.J)
    It’s compulsory but I wish I could
    if I were you I'd put in the bare minimum to pass it-more time to focus on the subject you wanna do well in.

    also is it true I have to quote you so u get a notification-(were you notified when I replied the first time)
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    (Original post by angrypoliceman)
    if I were you I'd put in the bare minimum to pass it-more time to focus on the subject you wanna do well in.

    also is it true I have to quote you so u get a notification-(were you notified when I replied the first time)
    Yes I’m on mobile so you think I should get the AS ? Don’t you think it would be better to have better grades elsewhere than mediocre grades and a C in as maths
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    (Original post by Reece.W.J)
    Yes I’m on mobile so you think I should get the AS ? Don’t you think it would be better to have better grades elsewhere than mediocre grades and a C in as maths
    take up geography and don't care about welsh is what im saying
    4as levels is manageable 5 would be stressful-no point making your life worse because of a subject you don't wanna do
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    (Original post by angrypoliceman)
    take up geography and don't care about welsh is what im saying
    4as levels is manageable 5 would be stressful-no point making your life worse because of a subject you don't wanna do
    It’s welsh bacc not Welsh it’s practical a free at least B that almost all unis take. All coursework
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    So, first of all Maths is required for Economics at most of the "top" courses - e.g. Cambridge, LSE, etc. Even for those that don't explicitly require it (such as Oxford PPE) it is an implicit requirement normally (for the PPE example, 95% of successful applicants have A-level Maths). Without getting into the broader debate, the Welsh Bacc won't normally be considered in setting offers by most major universities, and if it is used is primarily considered for "tie breaking" in a similar vein to Critical Thinking/General Studies and to a lesser extent an EPQ (although the latter will sometimes be considered in offers).


    Also Maths in Economics is not "just" stats. Calculus is used fluently throughout, and is in fact the basis for the mathematical statistics used in economics anyway. Linear algbebra (matrices) and various other topics such as differential equations and difference equations are also used in all of said "top" courses. In fact for LSE and Warwick there is the option (which is recommended if you wish to continue in Economics beyond undergraduate level) to take modules in real analysis and formal linear algebra , which while technically doesn't require A-level Maths in theory, you would likely struggle heavily with if you didn't take it - and definitely if you're finding the A-level content hard.

    I would suggest considering another degree option if you struggle in mathematics. There are no particular roles that require an economics degree aside from the aforementioned pursuit of it to graduate level (which is itself a prerequisite to a number of higher economic analyst roles in e.g. NGOs and in our government, although there are related roles which have no required background), so you could pursue any degree and still end up in the same place. The only exception is as noted going on to a PhD and hence related things, which realistically requires you to have suitable mathematics preparation to at least deal with a basic real analysis and abstract linear algebra course.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    So, first of all Maths is required for Economics at most of the "top" courses - e.g. Cambridge, LSE, etc. Even for those that don't explicitly require it (such as Oxford PPE) it is an implicit requirement normally (for the PPE example, 95% of successful applicants have A-level Maths). Without getting into the broader debate, the Welsh Bacc won't normally be considered in setting offers by most major universities, and if it is used is primarily considered for "tie breaking" in a similar vein to Critical Thinking/General Studies and to a lesser extent an EPQ (although the latter will sometimes be considered in offers).


    Also Maths in Economics is not "just" stats. Calculus is used fluently throughout, and is in fact the basis for the mathematical statistics used in economics anyway. Linear algbebra (matrices) and various other topics such as differential equations and difference equations are also used in all of said "top" courses. In fact for LSE and Warwick there is the option (which is recommended if you wish to continue in Economics beyond undergraduate level) to take modules in real analysis and formal linear algebra , which while technically doesn't require A-level Maths in theory, you would likely struggle heavily with if you didn't take it - and definitely if you're finding the A-level content hard.

    I would suggest considering another degree option if you struggle in mathematics. There are no particular roles that require an economics degree aside from the aforementioned pursuit of it to graduate level (which is itself a prerequisite to a number of higher economic analyst roles in e.g. NGOs and in our government, although there are related roles which have no required background), so you could pursue any degree and still end up in the same place. The only exception is as noted going on to a PhD and hence related things, which realistically requires you to have suitable mathematics preparation to at least deal with a basic real analysis and abstract linear algebra course.
    Luckily I’m in year 12 and have a decent amount of time to decide. Would you recommend I drop maths though because I genuinely think I won’t be able to get a good grade in it. I believe geography and economics go well together but I do chemistry so can’t do that at uni w/o maths. It’s like maths is needed for everything but it’s not even real maths
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    So, first of all Maths is required for Economics at most of the "top" courses - e.g. Cambridge, LSE, etc. Even for those that don't explicitly require it (such as Oxford PPE) it is an implicit requirement normally (for the PPE example, 95% of successful applicants have A-level Maths). Without getting into the broader debate, the Welsh Bacc won't normally be considered in setting offers by most major universities, and if it is used is primarily considered for "tie breaking" in a similar vein to Critical Thinking/General Studies and to a lesser extent an EPQ (although the latter will sometimes be considered in offers).


    Also Maths in Economics is not "just" stats. Calculus is used fluently throughout, and is in fact the basis for the mathematical statistics used in economics anyway. Linear algbebra (matrices) and various other topics such as differential equations and difference equations are also used in all of said "top" courses. In fact for LSE and Warwick there is the option (which is recommended if you wish to continue in Economics beyond undergraduate level) to take modules in real analysis and formal linear algebra , which while technically doesn't require A-level Maths in theory, you would likely struggle heavily with if you didn't take it - and definitely if you're finding the A-level content hard.

    I would suggest considering another degree option if you struggle in mathematics. There are no particular roles that require an economics degree aside from the aforementioned pursuit of it to graduate level (which is itself a prerequisite to a number of higher economic analyst roles in e.g. NGOs and in our government, although there are related roles which have no required background), so you could pursue any degree and still end up in the same place. The only exception is as noted going on to a PhD and hence related things, which realistically requires you to have suitable mathematics preparation to at least deal with a basic real analysis and abstract linear algebra course.
    Also from what I’ve seen regarding the Welsh bacc I’ve seen AAA courses that take AAB (b in Welsh bacc) as an alternative offer
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    Should I just do all 4 + Welsh bacc for now or would it be too much? I’d have barely any frees
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    (Original post by Reece.W.J)
    Luckily I’m in year 12 and have a decent amount of time to decide. Would you recommend I drop maths though because I genuinely think I won’t be able to get a good grade in it. I believe geography and economics go well together but I do chemistry so can’t do that at uni w/o maths. It’s like maths is needed for everything but it’s not even real maths
    (Original post by Reece.W.J)
    Also from what I’ve seen regarding the Welsh bacc I’ve seen AAA courses that take AAB (b in Welsh bacc) as an alternative offer
    (Original post by Reece.W.J)
    Should I just do all 4 + Welsh bacc for now or would it be too much? I’d have barely any frees
    Quality is more important than quantity so there is no point doing all 4 subjects. If you think you can't get a good grade in Maths, you should consider whether this can be worked around (e.g. with extra work, seeing if the school can arrange after school tutoring or similar) or if not, then drop it and write off any STEM/numerate courses as options now. I suspect you could get a good grade, with hard work, but Maths very much requires a continual commitment - you need to be working at it every week, if not every day. Geography does complement Economics but without Maths you somewhat limit your outlook - it would be a good background for e.g. Politics and International Relations, Development Studies, and Geography itself.

    Chemistry is largely irrelevant to your choices - if you're very confident that you can get a good grade though by all means keep it as this will help in applying later if you have a good predicted result for that. However the general scientific background of Chemistry may be useful for e.g. Human Sciences or more scientific Archaeology courses, if that's of interest. Additionally Chemistry and Geography may be suitable background in itself to pursue some Earth Sciences and related (such as Oceanography or Climate Sciences) courses, but without Maths you're very limited and any course that doesn't require Maths will teach you the content in first year anyway - except you'll have less time to learn it in and less opportunity to get individual attention.

    Welsh universities may view it differently, but I'm not aware of any of the "top" English universities using it as anything more than a "tiebreaker" if even that. This isn't to say it will negatively impact your application (it certainly won't provided you have the 3 A-levels) but it won't necessarily benefit your application.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Quality is more important than quantity so there is no point doing all 4 subjects. If you think you can't get a good grade in Maths, you should consider whether this can be worked around (e.g. with extra work, seeing if the school can arrange after school tutoring or similar) or if not, then drop it and write off any STEM/numerate courses as options now. I suspect you could get a good grade, with hard work, but Maths very much requires a continual commitment - you need to be working at it every week, if not every day. Geography does complement Economics but without Maths you somewhat limit your outlook - it would be a good background for e.g. Politics and International Relations, Development Studies, and Geography itself.

    Chemistry is largely irrelevant to your choices - if you're very confident that you can get a good grade though by all means keep it as this will help in applying later if you have a good predicted result for that. However the general scientific background of Chemistry may be useful for e.g. Human Sciences or more scientific Archaeology courses, if that's of interest. Additionally Chemistry and Geography may be suitable background in itself to pursue some Earth Sciences and related (such as Oceanography or Climate Sciences) courses, but without Maths you're very limited and any course that doesn't require Maths will teach you the content in first year anyway - except you'll have less time to learn it in and less opportunity to get individual attention.

    Welsh universities may view it differently, but I'm not aware of any of the "top" English universities using it as anything more than a "tiebreaker" if even that. This isn't to say it will negatively impact your application (it certainly won't provided you have the 3 A-levels) but it won't necessarily benefit your application.
    Ok thanks I’ll definitely pick up geography on Monday and take a bit more time to decide what to drop. May end up being chemistry though because it’s not useful to me
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    (Original post by Reece.W.J)
    Ok thanks I’ll definitely pick up geography on Monday and take a bit more time to decide what to drop. May end up being chemistry though because it’s not useful to me
    If you're confident you can get an A or a B, it is still useful - moreso than Maths if you end up getting a C in that subject. If you think you can make do with the temporary increase in workload it's a reasonable approach to hedge your bets.
 
 
 
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