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How is Jane Eyer represented differently then other female characters? Watch

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    I'm trying to write an A level essay in the represention of female characters in Jane Eyer and how Jane is different from them.
    For instance Blanche Ingram and Georgina Reeds are pressed as being the ideal women in the Victorian times. Helen is also the type of female character people during that time would prefer. (Being pure, very kind and somewhat motherly)
    Bessie the maid at gatesshed starts to show motherly qualities but still very loyal to the class system.
    Any ideas?
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    I studied Jane Eyre for AS last year, my knowledge may be a bit rusty by now. I think it would be good to explore how Jane challenges Victorian hierarchies and empowers herself (e.g. the scene where Jane says "women feel as men feel", saving Rochester from the fire, bird imagery to symbolise independence, Jane does not marry Rochester until she can achieve independence), whereas Helen Burns is more submissive, which was an ideal trait in the Victorian era. Jane is also the 'dark double' (critics Gilbert and Gubar) of Bertha, they have similar characteristics but Jane's passionate nature is kept inside, whereas Bertha's isn't.
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    (Original post by khookie)
    I studied Jane Eyre for AS last year, my knowledge may be a bit rusty by now. I think it would be good to explore how Jane challenges Victorian hierarchies and empowers herself (e.g. the scene where Jane says "women feel as men feel", saving Rochester from the fire, bird imagery to symbolise independence, Jane does not marry Rochester until she can achieve independence), whereas Helen Burns is more submissive, which was an ideal trait in the Victorian era. Jane is also the 'dark double' (critics Gilbert and Gubar) of Bertha, they have similar characteristics but Jane's passionate nature is kept inside, whereas Bertha's isn't.
    Thanks
    I agree with every point; I also find the similarties between Jane and Bertha a bit unerving since they were actully pretty similar. Jane might as well ended up like her.
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    (Original post by Matilda612)
    Thanks
    I agree with every point; I also find the similarties between Jane and Bertha a bit unerving since they were actully pretty similar. Jane might as well ended up like her.
    Definitely, which is why I love that dark double critic quote. I remember noting in an essay that Bronte's use of fire imagery in association with Jane corresponds to the behaviour of Bertha, which is perhaps a warning to Jane of what she may become if she starts to express her passion and fire.
 
 
 
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