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How do I remember case studies for Geography? Watch

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    I am in Year 11 at the moment and I have a mock this coming week for Paper 1 Geography. I have been told by my teacher to revise 7 case studies of which only 2 will come up.

    Im finding it difficult to recall certain points in the case studies, like Earthquakes in Italy and Pakistan which counts a one case study. The difficulty lies within remembering Primary Effects and so on. Like how many died and what was done after (responses).

    If you did or are doing Geography what do you suggest is the best way to remember case studies from Geography?

    Many thanks
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    (Original post by Oneiropólos)
    I am in Year 11 at the moment and I have a mock this coming week for Paper 1 Geography. I have been told by my teacher to revise 7 case studies of which only 2 will come up.

    Im finding it difficult to recall certain points in the case studies, like Earthquakes in Italy and Pakistan which counts a one case study. The difficulty lies within remembering Primary Effects and so on. Like how many died and what was done after (responses).

    If you did or are doing Geography what do you suggest is the best way to remember case studies from Geography?

    Many thanks
    When I was studying geography at GCSE and A Level, I found that the best way for me to learn case studies was by repetition, i.e. I'd read through a case study, then try to write down as many of the points as I could from memory, and I would repeat this until I was confident on each of the case studies. Another tip is to round deaths etc to the nearest whole number, then give the number as an approximate figure (rather than trying to learn exact figures e.g. approximately 150 deaths rather than 147). Splitting up case studies into primary and secondary impacts, and social, economic and environmental impacts also makes the points easier to learn.

    I hope that helps
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    (Original post by Leviathan1741)
    When I was studying geography at GCSE and A Level, I found that the best way for me to learn case studies was by repetition, i.e. I'd read through a case study, then try to write down as many of the points as I could from memory, and I would repeat this until I was confident on each of the case studies. Another tip is to round deaths etc to the nearest whole number, then give the number as an approximate figure (rather than trying to learn exact figures). Splitting up case studies into primary and secondary impacts, and social, economic and environmental impacts also makes the points easier to learn.

    I hope that helps
    Thanks so much!
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    I used to imagine I lived in the places and thought about the material as if I experienced it and it impacted my family. Not just dry facts but seeing physical geography as my countryside, climate as the weather we got through the year, economic geography as the companies and work plus development and trade. I started doing it this way when we did the Teem Valley Trading Estate back in year 7 as it really was where I grew up and I knew it first hand in many ways. I kept the approach for fun when we did the Netherlands, north then south Italy, Brazil and Malaysia etc as it was fun inventing a life in these places. It worked well as not only did the separate facts stick and make sense but I found the weaving together of stuff into a made up life made recall so easy as it was just a story of where I lived!
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    (Original post by Amanda L)
    I used to imagine I lived in the places and thought about the material as if I experienced it and it impacted my family. Not just dry facts but seeing physical geography as my countryside, climate as the weather we got through the year, economic geography as the companies and work plus development and trade. I started doing it this way when we did the Teem Valley Trading Estate back in year 7 as it really was where I grew up and I knew it first hand in many ways. I kept the approach for fun when we did the Netherlands, north then south Italy, Brazil and Malaysia etc as it was fun inventing a life in these places. It worked well as not only did the separate facts stick and make sense but I found the weaving together of stuff into a made up life made recall so easy as it was just a story of where I lived!
    Thats a very creative way! I'll try that aswell. Thanks
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    I mainly use repetition and practice questions to learn case studies. There are only so many questions they can ask you on each case study, generally these are: What caused the event? What were the impacts (primary,secondary,social, economic ,environmental)? How was it managed? I then write a "perfect" answer for each question using the textbook and the internet and try my best to memorize it sentence by sentence. The next day I will then explain the case study to my parents,which helps me realise what I've forgotten overnight. The next week, I will revisit the questions and try to answer them without looking at the "perfect" answer. I know it's really boring but it does work and when you come to revisit the case studies in the future you find that it all comes flooding back to you as soon as you read over your notes. I hope this helps!
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    (Original post by Laura/)
    I mainly use repetition and practice questions to learn case studies. There are only so many questions they can ask you on each case study, generally these are: What caused the event? What were the impacts (primary,secondary,social, economic ,environmental)? How was it managed? I then write a "perfect" answer for each question using the textbook and the internet and try my best to memorize it sentence by sentence. The next day I will then explain the case study to my parents,which helps me realise what I've forgotten overnight. The next week, I will revisit the questions and try to answer them without looking at the "perfect" answer. I know it's really boring but it does work and when you come to revisit the case studies in the future you find that it all comes flooding back to you as soon as you read over your notes. I hope this helps!
    Thanks! I''ll try that out
 
 
 
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