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    I was just wondering about everyone's opinion on nature vs nurture. Which one would you think is mostly the cause of criminal behaviour,what influenced the first traits of criminality? Do you believe in eugenics?Actions within society: based on biological or environmental factors mostly?Had this discussion in class and found it quite interesting
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    (Original post by Tkkkkk16)
    I was just wondering about everyone's opinion on nature vs nurture. Which one would you think is mostly the cause of criminal behaviour? Do you believe in eugenics? Actions within society: based on biological or environmental factors mostly?Had this discussion in class and found it quite interesting
    Criminal behavior? Definitely nurture. I think it's mostly down to bad influences during youth. However, I do think that there might be some biologically-inherited traits which may increase the likelihood of someone becoming a criminal
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    (Original post by TheMindGarage)
    Criminal behavior? Definitely nurture. I think it's mostly down to bad influences during youth. However, I do think that there might be some biologically-inherited traits which may increase the likelihood of someone becoming a criminal
    Agree
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    Take Pitbulls as an example of this. They are banned in the UK because of their savage nature; however, when raised properly they can be as friendly as any other dog.
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    (Original post by Tkkkkk16)
    I was just wondering about everyone's opinion on nature vs nurture. Which one would you think is mostly the cause of criminal behaviour,what influenced the first traits of criminality? Do you believe in eugenics?Actions within society: based on biological or environmental factors mostly?Had this discussion in class and found it quite interesting
    Can be both. I would say that in almost all cases though nurture has to play at least some part. That may be a bad childhood or an issue that happens later in life, but most natural issues will have some sort of trigger that leads to bad behaviour.

    Statistics show that children from an abusive household are more likely to become abusive themselves and that people who come from poorer areas are more likely to turn to gangs or vandalise things.
    Even on a small scale, peer pressure can lead children into bullying even their friends or to doing "bad things" like breaking school rules, swearing at mum or smoking.
    It's clear that environment has a huge influence on people.

    There were even some (quite dodgy) experiments that showed totally normal people turning to some awful behaviours because of the influence of people or the environment around them.
    The Milgram experiment saw people (as far as they knew) electrocute others to death because an authority figure pressured them to and the Stanford Prison experiment saw college students abuse each other after being put in a position of power in an environment that encouraged it.
    That shows that even a very short term environmental or social influence can breed bad behaviours.

    There are some physical issues that can lead to somebody being more likely to do bad things, like a lack of empathy, higher susceptibility to stress etc. Nurture can help with a lot of those things and people with natural issues can still be wonderful members of society.
    Nurture can also turn otherwise normal, innocent people into monsters. Nurture decides what path nature is put down and how it is used.

    While nature needs some trigger to turn into bad behaviour, environment and nurture can mess people up without any natural influence.

    Animals can actually be a great example of this. We keep biological killing machines in our houses as pets and let them snuggle up with us. Cats are born hunters and if left without a home will be feral. They will attack humans and act as a wild animal.
    Keep one in your house though and they'll curl up on your bed and let you rub their belly, meow at you when they come in from the rain so you will dry them off, follow you to the toilet to ask for affection or food. We've turned mini terminators into fluffy cushions using mostly nurture. House cats are a prime example of nurture totally outweighing nature.
    We even have cases of that same thing in much larger and wilder animals. With the right nurture, people have been able to build relationships with lions, polar bears, hyena and other wild and dangerous animals.

    Nurture is a very powerful tool and can be used for good or bad. Nature only lays the groundwork.
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    Nature makes psychopaths.

    Nurture makes sociopaths.
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    (Original post by cosmicsnowflake)
    Nature makes psychopaths.

    Nurture makes sociopaths.
    And what is the difference between the two, exactly?
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    (Original post by bones-mccoy)
    And what is the difference between the two, exactly?
    Psychopaths and sociopaths are very similar in that they are anti-social disorders, but there are differences between the two.

    Psychopaths do not feel remorse, they do not have a conscience. They are more manipulative and can not bond with others.

    Sociopaths on the other hand do feel remorse and guilt, they have a conscience, and are able to make friends. They can blend in with society.

    This video explains the differences very well: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6lD8JEsFpQ&
 
 
 
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