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Trying to develop a code for psychology experiment.. where to begin? Watch

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    The premise is, you see the face (either happy or sad) then click a key depending on answer (e.g left for happy and right for sad). If you get the answer right the face is on screen for less time and if you’re wrong it’s on for more.
    Basically a speed test for recognising emotions, help would be greatly appreciated
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    Would be a very simple project in VB.Net or if you have experience in Python, Tkinter.
    I'd recommend using VB.Net, as it's pretty simple to learn and a lot of it is graphically based so keeping the coding to a minimum.

    http://www.vbtutor.net/index.php/vis...2017-tutorial/

    Also do not forget to use stackoverflow as well as google to help find code snippets or solutions to problems you may face.
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    How much coding experience have you got?
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    (Original post by Joe1000000)
    How much coding experience have you got?
    Absolutely zero.. but if there’s any resources you’d recommend or templates etc
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    Here's some advice I posted on another thread but I believe it could help you with your project. The project is supposed to be challenging and you have to think about all the solutions.




    I'm doing Computer Science OCR A level (sitting the a level exam in 7 months or something)

    That's a common feeling. Think of a reasonable problem you're seeing on a daily basis which could have a computational solution and then work from there. That's the whole purpose of having an analysis/research section. It takes a lot of time. Get it done quickly; the only way you'll get it done is by starting it.

    Here could be some potential problems:

    -A basic (like tetris snake etc) game you play has some limitations and you would like to improve them.
    -A library management/booking system (this is for students who have no ideas what so ever you can still get an A* with this if you do it right)

    Any problem you see; it requires a good amount of thinking. It took me a good 10 + hours of brainstorming to think of a project which had sufficient complexity (algorithms wise) and had a purpose so that I could talk about it easily in my write up.


    After that just make some abstraction/class/ER/flowchart diagrams in the design and list all the inputs/outputs/processes (easier to decompose what you need to do when you look at each bullet point for the top band marks for each section). If necessary I can put some points up here to help you with that.

    The exam board emphasises that the whole point of the project is to be a learning experience (but that's not an excuse not to get an A in it) so you will learn quite a lot while making your program. The project is only 25% of your A level grade but it's really worth doing it well. It will also indirectly help you with your exam if you do it right.

    Java

    In my case I had to learn java (to the advanced level) and learn how to manage my own backend SQL database with a jdbc driver just to get the boiler-plate code out of the way that's ignoring the extra thinking time it can take to develop your own algorithms for certain problems. I would also advise that you use windows builder (which operates off of the swing package) when making your program (if it's in java and you're using eclipse). The examiner doesn't care about how pretty your project looks and how much effort you put into making it look pretty so just use windows builder as a short cut. It's beneficial to make your algorithms well defined before hand so you can easily split your solution up into many different easy to compute/solve procedures.

    If you select the Agile software development methodology (which I recommend you do since it's not a big enough project to use spiral/waterfall effectively) make sure to show that you're in constant contact with your stakeholder and be sure to regularly get and incorporate their feedback on any major changes.
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    (Original post by EpicMan)
    Here's some advice I posted on another thread but I believe it could help you with your project. The project is supposed to be challenging and you have to think about all the solutions.




    I'm doing Computer Science OCR A level (sitting the a level exam in 7 months or something)

    That's a common feeling. Think of a reasonable problem you're seeing on a daily basis which could have a computational solution and then work from there. That's the whole purpose of having an analysis/research section. It takes a lot of time. Get it done quickly; the only way you'll get it done is by starting it.

    Here could be some potential problems:

    -A basic (like tetris snake etc) game you play has some limitations and you would like to improve them.
    -A library management/booking system (this is for students who have no ideas what so ever you can still get an A* with this if you do it right)

    Any problem you see; it requires a good amount of thinking. It took me a good 10 + hours of brainstorming to think of a project which had sufficient complexity (algorithms wise) and had a purpose so that I could talk about it easily in my write up.


    After that just make some abstraction/class/ER/flowchart diagrams in the design and list all the inputs/outputs/processes (easier to decompose what you need to do when you look at each bullet point for the top band marks for each section). If necessary I can put some points up here to help you with that.

    The exam board emphasises that the whole point of the project is to be a learning experience (but that's not an excuse not to get an A in it) so you will learn quite a lot while making your program. The project is only 25% of your A level grade but it's really worth doing it well. It will also indirectly help you with your exam if you do it right.

    Java

    In my case I had to learn java (to the advanced level) and learn how to manage my own backend SQL database with a jdbc driver just to get the boiler-plate code out of the way that's ignoring the extra thinking time it can take to develop your own algorithms for certain problems. I would also advise that you use windows builder (which operates off of the swing package) when making your program (if it's in java and you're using eclipse). The examiner doesn't care about how pretty your project looks and how much effort you put into making it look pretty so just use windows builder as a short cut. It's beneficial to make your algorithms well defined before hand so you can easily split your solution up into many different easy to compute/solve procedures.

    If you select the Agile software development methodology (which I recommend you do since it's not a big enough project to use spiral/waterfall effectively) make sure to show that you're in constant contact with your stakeholder and be sure to regularly get and incorporate their feedback on any major changes.
    I’m sorry should’ve been more specific.. this is something I actually have to do as an experiment. Not a theoretical approach like I believe you explained. Thanks anyway for your efforts
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    (Original post by Dannymacintosh)
    I’m sorry should’ve been more specific.. this is something I actually have to do as an experiment. Not a theoretical approach like I believe you explained. Thanks anyway for your efforts
    Oh yeah if you're having problems with your program I suggest you take it up here: https://stackoverflow.com/
 
 
 
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