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    Hello,

    I am a 3rd year LLB Scots Law & English Law undergraduate. I am confident of achieving, a minimum 2:1 but aim for a First. I want to become a solicitor, and in an ideal world will take the LPC course in England upon graduation after securing a traineeship with a firm.

    I've always had ambitions of working somewhere 'big'. Of course, London appeals massively. But I want to go and experience the USA and, of course, it doesn't get much bigger than NYC which would definitely appeal. I'm not being naive - I understand the need to sit the NY bar and how realistically, coming from England, your best chance would probably be getting transferred there by a US firm with an office in London.

    Is there any way I can make my wish of further study in the USA possible without sacrificing my chances of securing a traineeship with a top firm? Is it perhaps viable to ditch study here altogether and go and continue life in the USA qualifying there? Is there anything I can study in the USA for a year after graduation that will make me a more attractive candidate for securing a traineeship with Big Law back in London, perhaps then applying again after completing a 4 year LLB followed by 1/2 year study in USA?

    A lot of questions but I'm just trying to convey that nothing is committed to at the moment and I'm trying to gain as much knowledge as I can. Is the 4 year undergraduate route // traineeship secured // LPC course financed // traineeship begins route the route I should follow? Or can I go abroad and make myself an even more attractive candidate in a year? I doubt there's the possibility of studying the LPC abroad at a reputable establishment, is there?

    Appreciate all advice!
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    (Original post by aidangranada)
    Hello,

    I am a 3rd year LLB Scots Law & English Law undergraduate. I am confident of achieving, a minimum 2:1 but aim for a First. I want to become a solicitor, and in an ideal world will take the LPC course in England upon graduation after securing a traineeship with a firm.

    I've always had ambitions of working somewhere 'big'. Of course, London appeals massively. But I want to go and experience the USA and, of course, it doesn't get much bigger than NYC which would definitely appeal. I'm not being naive - I understand the need to sit the NY bar and how realistically, coming from England, your best chance would probably be getting transferred there by a US firm with an office in London.

    Is there any way I can make my wish of further study in the USA possible without sacrificing my chances of securing a traineeship with a top firm? Is it perhaps viable to ditch study here altogether and go and continue life in the USA qualifying there? Is there anything I can study in the USA for a year after graduation that will make me a more attractive candidate for securing a traineeship with Big Law back in London, perhaps then applying again after completing a 4 year LLB followed by 1/2 year study in USA?

    A lot of questions but I'm just trying to convey that nothing is committed to at the moment and I'm trying to gain as much knowledge as I can. Is the 4 year undergraduate route // traineeship secured // LPC course financed // traineeship begins route the route I should follow? Or can I go abroad and make myself an even more attractive candidate in a year? I doubt there's the possibility of studying the LPC abroad at a reputable establishment, is there?

    Appreciate all advice!
    The major issue with trying to qualify in the US is having the funds to pay for a JD course. Without a JD, working in the US will be exceptionally difficult, and that is made worse by the fact you'd need someone to sponsor a work visa. That is why the transferring with a UK firm tends to be the far more realistic approach for many.

    I have recruited people who have studied in the US and have deferred trainees start dates where they have wanted to do an LLM in the US and sit the NYB. But I can count those people on one hand out of several hundreds of trainees.

    You can study the LPC online, but it is very much a English (and Welsh) qualification - it means practically nothing in other jursdictions, so its not like you can study it outside of an English/Welsh institution.

    A US PG degree will undoubtedly be impressive in terms of prestige, especially with a top US university. But it could make many question why you have chosen a career in the UK when the route you seem to have taken is for the US. UK firms will want to see a commitment to London, especially considering how much they are going to pay for your training.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    The major issue with trying to qualify in the US is having the funds to pay for a JD course. Without a JD, working in the US will be exceptionally difficult, and that is made worse by the fact you'd need someone to sponsor a work visa. That is why the transferring with a UK firm tends to be the far more realistic approach for many.

    I have recruited people who have studied in the US and have deferred trainees start dates where they have wanted to do an LLM in the US and sit the NYB. But I can count those people on one hand out of several hundreds of trainees.

    You can study the LPC online, but it is very much a English (and Welsh) qualification - it means practically nothing in other jursdictions, so its not like you can study it outside of an English/Welsh institution.

    A US PG degree will undoubtedly be impressive in terms of prestige, especially with a top US university. But it could make many question why you have chosen a career in the UK when the route you seem to have taken is for the US. UK firms will want to see a commitment to London, especially considering how much they are going to pay for your training.
    Thanks for the response. That all makes sense.

    So, I have 2 options:
    (1) LLB - LPC - Traineeship
    (2) LLB - US PG Degree - (once finished, apply for traineeship) LPC - Traineeship

    Would I be putting myself at a disadvantage to my competitors if I chose the 2nd route, and what can I study that would set me apart anyway?
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    (Original post by aidangranada)
    Thanks for the response. That all makes sense.

    So, I have 2 options:
    (1) LLB - LPC - Traineeship
    (2) LLB - US PG Degree - (once finished, apply for traineeship) LPC - Traineeship

    Would I be putting myself at a disadvantage to my competitors if I chose the 2nd route, and what can I study that would set me apart anyway?
    It would only really make sense to study an LLM in the US if that’s the case, but that still wouldn’t automatically improve your chances of a TC in the UK.

    A three year JD would only make sense if you were trying to start your career in the US.

    Yes - there would be some disadvantages. Your motivation for working in the UK could be put into question, it won’t be as easy to network with law firm, do Work experience with them, attend open days etc when you are in the US, although unless you wanted time out after studying, you’d actually have apply for training contracts before your LLM had started (or in the second year of your JD if you did take that route). There will be some advantages though, although the cost of fees and studying in the US may make those advantages seem ridiculously expensive.

    No course will “set you apart” though.
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    I've been researching some US firms with offices in London and I understand their intakes are commonly considerably smaller than the UK firms.

    Do you happen to know if it is viewed as less competitive if you're wanting to secure a training contract with a US firm compared to a UK? I see the salaries tend to be slightly higher.
 
 
 
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