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Is it OK that there are parts of the UK which are majority non-White British? Watch

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    There are entire neighbourhoods of cities/towns like London, Bradford, Luton, Leicester, Rotherham, Slough, Batley, Blackburn, Birmingham and small towns across the country that are majority Asian. There seems to be a lot of racial segregation in a lot of cities, which points to a clear integration problem. In a majority white British country like the UK, it's quite shocking, especially to tourists, that there are parts of London which are majority non-white where you'd struggle to find an English person. I feel like we are losing our identity. The non-white population is increasing at a rapid rate and even though we're not going to be minorities in our country anytime soon, we are already minorities

    Imagine if you go to Tokyo and there are large swathes of the city where the majority of people are black or Indian instead of Japanese. Here, we seem to not care about our ethnic identity. Being British is no longer connected to our heritage, almost anyone who's born here is considered 'British' even if they don't live in our culture.
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    No of course not
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    (Original post by MartinF98)
    There are entire neighbourhoods of cities/towns like London, Bradford, Luton, Leicester, Rotherham, Slough, Batley, Blackburn, Birmingham and small towns across the country that are majority Asian. There seems to be a lot of racial segregation in a lot of cities, which points to a clear integration problem. In a majority white British country like the UK, it's quite shocking, especially to tourists, that there are parts of London which are majority non-white where you'd struggle to find an English person. I feel like we are losing our identity. The non-white population is increasing at a rapid rate and even though we're not going to be minorities in our country anytime soon, we are already minorities

    Imagine if you go to Tokyo and there are large swathes of the city where the majority of people are black or Indian instead of Japanese. Here, we seem to not care about our ethnic identity. Being British is no longer connected to our heritage, almost anyone who's born here is considered 'British' even if they don't live in our culture.
    It's not OK.
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    Even though I've lived here my entire life, I don't think I can ever be considered truly British because I'm obviously not of British heritage. There is always an ethnic aspect of being British, it's not the same as being American since the White British are the indigenous population whereas in America the majority of people are of immigrant descent. I'd love to be considered British but the truth is that the majority of people here would never completely accept even the most British-sounding, British-like person of non-white heritage to be fully British unfortunately. Look at Mo Farah, Nadiya from Bake off, Riz Ahmed, they're all 'British' but neither their own parents and relatives or the wider British public will know them as anything other than the token Muslim guy or the token black guy. Subconsciously people just don't consider us British and that's why even if everyone integrates people are still going to be secretly angry about non-white towns and enighboruhoods, because they'll never be considered truly British
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    No, it's not okay. I'm a beautiful Vietnamese woman and I've integrated. I live in a two bedroom council flat in Peckham (hate them bedroom taxes but need the spare bedroom to keep my husbands coffin). I integrate with other people like blacks
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    (Original post by MartinF98)
    Being British is no longer connected to our heritage, almost anyone who's born here is considered 'British' even if they don't live in our culture.
    So what do you define as a british culture then? My dad is from the Caribbean, he has lived in England for over 50 years and is as British as any other person I know. You could not tell that he is Carribean from his personality alone. He has a British passport, he contributes to this society. He is British.

    Do we all have to speak like the queen, wear top hats and drink tea to be British now or something?

    I think integration is a problem, but I don't think it has anything to do with those cultures personally. I think it's our **** government not doing enough to make everyone in this country equal.
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    (Original post by FarhanHalim)
    Even though I've lived here my entire life, I don't think I can ever be considered truly British because I'm obviously not of British heritage. There is always an ethnic aspect of being British, it's not the same as being American since the White British are the indigenous population whereas in America the majority of people are of immigrant descent. I'd love to be considered British but the truth is that the majority of people here would never completely accept even the most British-sounding, British-like person of non-white heritage to be fully British unfortunately. Look at Mo Farah, Nadiya from Bake off, Riz Ahmed, they're all 'British' but neither their own parents and relatives or the wider British public will know them as anything other than the token Muslim guy or the token black guy. Subconsciously people just don't consider us British and that's why even if everyone integrates people are still going to be secretly angry about non-white towns and enighboruhoods, because they'll never be considered truly British
    Pretty much this. I'm only British on paper.
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    most parts are majority white british so why not...?
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    Does anyone have a genuine argument as to what the issue is? Do white british people somehow expect the rest of us to suck up to them and live next to them so they have some nice coloured neighbours?
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    The sad fact is that I feel fully British and act as British as any white British person I know but due to my ethnic background obviously I don't 'look British' and I feel that because of that I'll never actually be considered truly British. I feel like in this country you do need to be white in order to be considered truly British by the majority of people, no matter how hard you integrate people are always going to look confused when they ask you where you're from and you say 'London'. More than half the time the second question is always 'yeah but where are your parents from/where are you from ORIGINALLY?'

    These non-white towns are always going to be considered non-British even if they integrate.
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    People are People. We are all the same, all born and all will die, why is it a problem if someone is not white? and is living in the UK?
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    the sad thing is most of these places are horrible areas, not due to the area being horrible but due to the sense of it being another country where common decency is forgotten about. low amounts of immigration and intergration adds greatly to a country high amounts of immigration and low intergration is the death of a country and common decency
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    A lot of replies to this thread state (subtly or otherwise) that you can only truly be British if you're white. The majority of non-white immigrants to the UK are from former British colonies, meaning their ancestors were subject to British rule, and just as much a part of British history and can therefore be seen as equally 'British'. The 'if you're not white then you're not British' attitude is part of the reason why there's so much ethnic conflict and division within British society. If we could realise that immigrants from the former colonies are very much a part of our history, and vice versa, then I'm sure certain 'isolated' communities would adopt a more British identity and integrate more.
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    (Original post by MartinF98)
    There are entire neighbourhoods of cities/towns like London, Bradford, Luton, Leicester, Rotherham, Slough, Batley, Blackburn, Birmingham and small towns across the country that are majority Asian. There seems to be a lot of racial segregation in a lot of cities, which points to a clear integration problem. In a majority white British country like the UK, it's quite shocking, especially to tourists, that there are parts of London which are majority non-white where you'd struggle to find an English person. I feel like we are losing our identity. The non-white population is increasing at a rapid rate and even though we're not going to be minorities in our country anytime soon, we are already minorities

    Imagine if you go to Tokyo and there are large swathes of the city where the majority of people are black or Indian instead of Japanese. Here, we seem to not care about our ethnic identity. Being British is no longer connected to our heritage, almost anyone who's born here is considered 'British' even if they don't live in our culture.
    Maybe its because some of these people are very poor and its the poorest most deprived areas that house these people and no one else wants to live there?

    Will you be buying them houses in Chelsea and the Home Counties? Im sure a lot of them would happily swap places.
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    (Original post by jambojim97)
    A lot of replies to this thread state (subtly or otherwise) that you can only truly be British if you're white. The majority of non-white immigrants to the UK are from former British colonies, meaning their ancestors were subject to British rule, and just as much a part of British history and can therefore be seen as equally 'British'. The 'if you're not white then you're not British' attitude is part of the reason why there's so much ethnic conflict and division within British society. If we could realise that immigrants from the former colonies are very much a part of our history, and vice versa, then I'm sure certain 'isolated' communities would adopt a more British identity and integrate more.
    I'd love it if that happened but unfortunately it doesn't seem like the majoirty of white British people will ever consider someone British of non-white heritage to be as British as them. My grandparents and great grandparents lived under British rule, I'm 'British' and act as British as anyone else but my whole life, even when living in one of the most cosmopolitan, liberal parts of the country (London suburbs) the question is always 'but where are you from originally?'. I've pretty much learnt to accept it and not take offence and so have most non-white British people I know.
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    Why is it such a problem if they're not harming anyone or breaking the law?

    Do u see Arabs in Dubai trying to tell British people living in British compounds that only the Arab way is the norm and the correct way and therefore they should 'integrate' and Be like them. Do u see the Portuguese or Spanish doing the same to British people living in only British expat areas there

    Lol get over urselves.
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    (Original post by jambojim97)
    A lot of replies to this thread state (subtly or otherwise) that you can only truly be British if you're white. The majority of non-white immigrants to the UK are from former British colonies, meaning their ancestors were subject to British rule, and just as much a part of British history and can therefore be seen as equally 'British'. The 'if you're not white then you're not British' attitude is part of the reason why there's so much ethnic conflict and division within British society. If we could realise that immigrants from the former colonies are very much a part of our history, and vice versa, then I'm sure certain 'isolated' communities would adopt a more British identity and integrate more.
    I'd go even further and say that the fact that they were from former british colonies didnt matter. British colonies exploited the countries economically and stayed at the top, they didn't manage to push huge cultural changes.
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    a lot of people raise issues with integration but you end up with towns where ethnic minorities huddle up together because of **** like racism/ not feeling welcome/ constantly being treated as a foreigner.

    like other people said the whole "you're not british because you're not white" mindset a lot of english people seem to have is the reason why you end up with towns that are majority non-white. like when you hear white people on shows walking through some non-white town and saying "i feel intimidated/uncomfortable/ like this isnt the UK"

    to an extent it is definitely understandable but perhaps encouraging integration rather than making minorities feel isolated (and thus resorting to gathering around others of the same situation) would actually help?

    idk tho, this is just my opinion from what i've seen.. amongst many other things

    always felt isolated as a kid because of cultural differences and people making you feel like you dont belong just because you're not english/having a non-anglo sounding name, despite having a british accent and being raised here.

    AryanGh what do you think
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    Maybe if more white people decided to live in those areas they're be less "non white".

    Yes it's OK.
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    I don't want to be anywhere where one race is the majority, not even my own race. Unless I move to a different country where I'd be more than happy to learn from the locals like Japan or Brazil or something. 😊
 
 
 
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