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    Hi! I’m a bit confused on whether the rate of anaerobic respiration in yeast is faster with sucrose or maltose. Does the fructose from sucrose have to be converted to glucose before it undergoes glycolysis? Or does yeast contain enzymes which can turn it into an intermediate further along the glycolysis chain? Thanks!
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    Glycolysis makes fructose-6-phosphate anyway when making glucose-at least in mammals. So if there was an enzyme that could phosphorylate fructose it could feed in later to the glycolysis process, without losing any potential ATP production.
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    Yeast metabolises glucose preferentially (NJ et al., 2004)

    (Original post by plankyton)
    Hi! I’m a bit confused on whether the rate of anaerobic respiration in yeast is faster with sucrose or maltose. Does the fructose from sucrose have to be converted to glucose before it undergoes glycolysis? Or does yeast contain enzymes which can turn it into an intermediate further along the glycolysis chain? Thanks!
    And Quentin is right. Fructose can be transformed directly into fructose 1,6-bisphosphate which is one of the intermediaries in glycolysis. It does not need to be converted to Glucose.
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    (Original post by QuentinM)
    Glycolysis makes fructose-6-phosphate anyway when making glucose-at least in mammals. So if there was an enzyme that could phosphorylate fructose it could feed in later to the glycolysis process, without losing any potential ATP production.
    (Original post by Kvothe the Arcane)
    Yeast metabolises glucose preferentially (NJ et al., 2004)

    And Quentin is right. Fructose can be transformed directly into fructose 1,6-bisphosphate which is one of the intermediaries in glycolysis. It does not need to be converted to Glucose.
    Thank you! Does this mean that the rate of respiration with sucrose is faster than with maltose?
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    (Original post by plankyton)
    Thank you! Does this mean that the rate of respiration with sucrose is faster than with maltose?
    You're welcome. How do you conclude that from what I've said?
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    (Original post by Kvothe the Arcane)
    You're welcome. How do you conclude that from what I've said?
    Sucrose?
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    (Original post by plankyton)
    Sucrose?
    `he just said it metabolises glucose preferentially. This doesn't give any info on whether maltose/sucrose is preferred.
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    (Original post by QuentinM)
    `he just said it metabolises glucose preferentially. This doesn't give any info on whether maltose/sucrose is preferred.
    He also mentioned like you that fructose can be phosphorylated and so I assumed that sucrose would be preferred.
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