Writing a History essay with multiple sources?

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Hannahrae
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I'm currently studying towards an Access course (Access to Humanities) and I'm enjoying the course. However, we have a timed written essay to be completed in class next week, and although I've been receiving good comments, I'm could use some tips for preparation.

We have been told we will be given a source booklet, of which we have to choose and analyse (at least 4 to be considered distinction worthy) and then construct an essay comparing/contrasting the sources. I'm just a little unsure how I will construct an essay with more than 2 sources, as we have not done this before - any tips on ways to make the essay flow when concerning 4+ sources?

Additionally, any tips on how I should construct an introduction? (I know it's dependent on whatever the question asks, but as a general guide it would be good to make sure I'm on the right track!)

Thanks!
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999tigger
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(Original post by Hannahrae)
I'm currently studying towards an Access course (Access to Humanities) and I'm enjoying the course. However, we have a timed written essay to be completed in class next week, and although I've been receiving good comments, I'm could use some tips for preparation.

We have been told we will be given a source booklet, of which we have to choose and analyse (at least 4 to be considered distinction worthy) and then construct an essay comparing/contrasting the sources. I'm just a little unsure how I will construct an essay with more than 2 sources, as we have not done this before - any tips on ways to make the essay flow when concerning 4+ sources?

Additionally, any tips on how I should construct an introduction? (I know it's dependent on whatever the question asks, but as a general guide it would be good to make sure I'm on the right track!)

Thanks!
Imagine you are writing a police report on an accident and have to deal with 4 different witnesses.

Think about what was said, who was saying it , when and how good a witness they may be. Do they contradict or corroborate what someone said? Is someone in a better or unique position. Its up to you to piece together whats happened using where relevant each of these witnesses. thats all there is to it.
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04MR17
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(Original post by Hannahrae)
I'm currently studying towards an Access course (Access to Humanities) and I'm enjoying the course. However, we have a timed written essay to be completed in class next week, and although I've been receiving good comments, I'm could use some tips for preparation.

We have been told we will be given a source booklet, of which we have to choose and analyse (at least 4 to be considered distinction worthy) and then construct an essay comparing/contrasting the sources. I'm just a little unsure how I will construct an essay with more than 2 sources, as we have not done this before - any tips on ways to make the essay flow when concerning 4+ sources?

Additionally, any tips on how I should construct an introduction? (I know it's dependent on whatever the question asks, but as a general guide it would be good to make sure I'm on the right track!)

Thanks!
Focus on the question. Stick to the command words are you being asked to analyse them? Or compare them? Or to explain something? Or to evaluate how useful they are? Think about what the command word means and let that govern your answer.
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mhughesWHS17
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I did something similar for my controlled assessment a few years ago, this is how I would structure it:

SOURCE A SOURCE C (example sources)
SOURCE B SOURCE D

Intro: Outline your first impression of the question in relation to the sources, for example: "This essay explores the extent to which the following sources support or criticise the interpretation/question". Make sure you always refer to the question.

Then do a paragraph for each source, for example:
Source A:
P - point - source a supports the statement
E - evidence - because it talks about/mentions/criticises this...
E - explain - therefore, the source is reliable because...
E - evaluate - although, the source could be considered as insufficient because...
D - develop - therefore, it is not supportive and so i would not say the evidence supports the question...
L - link - ...unlike Source B which is more accurate

Then do source B, and link all the sources through paragraphs like that

Then do a summary...

Conclusion: Outline your final judgement and retain a balanced argument, link back to the question and use your most accurate source and weakest source to finalise your judgement. You could mention the other sources, but remember to not go into too much detail with limited sources.Talk about the purpose and reliability of the good ones in relation to the question, e.g. source a is accurate as it is not biased and was produced to infrom not as propaganda.
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Hannahrae
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(Original post by mhughesWHS17)
I did something similar for my controlled assessment a few years ago, this is how I would structure it:

SOURCE A SOURCE C (example sources)
SOURCE B SOURCE D

Intro: Outline your first impression of the question in relation to the sources, for example: "This essay explores the extent to which the following sources support or criticise the interpretation/question". Make sure you always refer to the question.

Then do a paragraph for each source, for example:
Source A:
P - point - source a supports the statement
E - evidence - because it talks about/mentions/criticises this...
E - explain - therefore, the source is reliable because...
E - evaluate - although, the source could be considered as insufficient because...
D - develop - therefore, it is not supportive and so i would not say the evidence supports the question...
L - link - ...unlike Source B which is more accurate

Then do source B, and link all the sources through paragraphs like that

Then do a summary...

Conclusion: Outline your final judgement and retain a balanced argument, link back to the question and use your most accurate source and weakest source to finalise your judgement. You could mention the other sources, but remember to not go into too much detail with limited sources.Talk about the purpose and reliability of the good ones in relation to the question, e.g. source a is accurate as it is not biased and was produced to infrom not as propaganda.

Thank you so much for your reply - it was very helpful and I'll keep all those points in mind!
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