Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

any successful losing weight stories from people with hypothyroidism? Watch

    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    if anyone has any routine which worked for them please post, i've always struggled to lose weight and i think it is due to my hypothyroidism:/
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Eat less, exercise more.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    hey! i have hypothyroidism! if you think your hypothyroidism is causing weight gain, you should probably discuss with your doctor, get a blood test done and see if your synthroid dosage (or other synthetic hormone/treatment you're taking) needs boosting! i gained a decent bit of weight before i got diagnosed and started taking synthroids, but once my dosage was sorted, i managed to lose quite a bit of it (or just generally get fitter/healthier) by, as any other healthy advice would suggest, eating healthier and exercising more.

    that being said, as general weight loss/health advice, i would strongly strongly recommend you don't 'eat less' to a point where you are hungry... i spent a year or so of my life constantly hungry because i thought that if i just skipped meals for a certain period of time i could lose the fat i didn't want then ditch the diet when i got there. during that time, my weight did not change. my advice: eat healthier! if you start to exercise in a way that makes you gain muscle (i was playing soccer and doing pilates), your metabolism will increase to sustain that new muscle and you will be hungrier. don't deprive your body of food! that's a very easy way to screw yourself over long term. being hungry is not sustainable. that being said, don't eat if you're not hungry. listen to your body, and don't ignore it if it tells you something's going amiss.

    healthy, effective, long term weight loss requires you to make a sustainable change to your lifestyle. a biology teacher of mine (who had been bulimic and has since become a total health nut) used to preach to us that one handy rule of thumb for healthier eating (one that has stood the test of time) is eating foods who's origins you are able to trace back. avoid processed foods! and integrate some form of exercise, even if that's just one 1h class, once a week into your schedule. gradually, the combination of exercise and good eating makes it easier to keep exercising and eating well. it's hard at the beginning, but it becomes a self reinforcing cycle, and once it's part of your routine you do it without thinking (and you'll have more energy to do it all!). the toughest bit is making this stuff part of your routine in the first place. i really recommend a scheduled class or sport rather than a vague 'i'll go to the gym more'... if you put money down towards something and stick it in your calendar, you'll be more likely to actually go

    hope this helped some, lmk if there's anything else i can do! (and sorry for the bloody great essay lol)
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by ed98)
    Eat less, exercise more.
    wow haven't tried that before!
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by jamiieh)
    hey! i have hypothyroidism! if you think your hypothyroidism is causing weight gain, you should probably discuss with your doctor, get a blood test done and see if your synthroid dosage (or other synthetic hormone/treatment you're taking) needs boosting! i gained a decent bit of weight before i got diagnosed and started taking synthroids, but once my dosage was sorted, i managed to lose quite a bit of it (or just generally get fitter/healthier) by, as any other healthy advice would suggest, eating healthier and exercising more.

    that being said, as general weight loss/health advice, i would strongly strongly recommend you don't 'eat less' to a point where you are hungry... i spent a year or so of my life constantly hungry because i thought that if i just skipped meals for a certain period of time i could lose the fat i didn't want then ditch the diet when i got there. during that time, my weight did not change. my advice: eat healthier! if you start to exercise in a way that makes you gain muscle (i was playing soccer and doing pilates), your metabolism will increase to sustain that new muscle and you will be hungrier. don't deprive your body of food! that's a very easy way to screw yourself over long term. being hungry is not sustainable. that being said, don't eat if you're not hungry. listen to your body, and don't ignore it if it tells you something's going amiss.

    healthy, effective, long term weight loss requires you to make a sustainable change to your lifestyle. a biology teacher of mine (who had been bulimic and has since become a total health nut) used to preach to us that one handy rule of thumb for healthier eating (one that has stood the test of time) is eating foods who's origins you are able to trace back. avoid processed foods! and integrate some form of exercise, even if that's just one 1h class, once a week into your schedule. gradually, the combination of exercise and good eating makes it easier to keep exercising and eating well. it's hard at the beginning, but it becomes a self reinforcing cycle, and once it's part of your routine you do it without thinking (and you'll have more energy to do it all!). the toughest bit is making this stuff part of your routine in the first place. i really recommend a scheduled class or sport rather than a vague 'i'll go to the gym more'... if you put money down towards something and stick it in your calendar, you'll be more likely to actually go

    hope this helped some, lmk if there's anything else i can do! (and sorry for the bloody great essay lol)
    hey thank you for the advice, my doctor says my thyroid levels are normal so i'm worried if i go back to tell them about my weight gain they'll say i don't need a change in my dose, but i'll definitely try anyways. I've tried going to the gym and eating healthier before and it didn't work. I'll try again though. Also i'm very anxious about going to the gym on my own, i've really been wanting to sign up tho, any tips to get over the anxiety?
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by jamiieh)
    hey! i have hypothyroidism! if you think your hypothyroidism is causing weight gain, you should probably discuss with your doctor, get a blood test done and see if your synthroid dosage (or other synthetic hormone/treatment you're taking) needs boosting! i gained a decent bit of weight before i got diagnosed and started taking synthroids, but once my dosage was sorted, i managed to lose quite a bit of it (or just generally get fitter/healthier) by, as any other healthy advice would suggest, eating healthier and exercising more.

    that being said, as general weight loss/health advice, i would strongly strongly recommend you don't 'eat less' to a point where you are hungry... i spent a year or so of my life constantly hungry because i thought that if i just skipped meals for a certain period of time i could lose the fat i didn't want then ditch the diet when i got there. during that time, my weight did not change. my advice: eat healthier! if you start to exercise in a way that makes you gain muscle (i was playing soccer and doing pilates), your metabolism will increase to sustain that new muscle and you will be hungrier. don't deprive your body of food! that's a very easy way to screw yourself over long term. being hungry is not sustainable. that being said, don't eat if you're not hungry. listen to your body, and don't ignore it if it tells you something's going amiss.

    healthy, effective, long term weight loss requires you to make a sustainable change to your lifestyle. a biology teacher of mine (who had been bulimic and has since become a total health nut) used to preach to us that one handy rule of thumb for healthier eating (one that has stood the test of time) is eating foods who's origins you are able to trace back. avoid processed foods! and integrate some form of exercise, even if that's just one 1h class, once a week into your schedule. gradually, the combination of exercise and good eating makes it easier to keep exercising and eating well. it's hard at the beginning, but it becomes a self reinforcing cycle, and once it's part of your routine you do it without thinking (and you'll have more energy to do it all!). the toughest bit is making this stuff part of your routine in the first place. i really recommend a scheduled class or sport rather than a vague 'i'll go to the gym more'... if you put money down towards something and stick it in your calendar, you'll be more likely to actually go

    hope this helped some, lmk if there's anything else i can do! (and sorry for the bloody great essay lol)
    sorry i forgot to add, i've heard stories of people eating healthier and exercising when they have hypothyroidism and they say their weight never changes, i'm scared that will happen to me
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: October 17, 2017
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Will you be richer or poorer than your parents?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.