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    This might be a silly question but I'm very much doubting myself whether I am actually suited to being a lawyer.

    I always wanted to do medicine but after doing work experience I found that it's not actually for me. Law has been my plan B since college as I did an A Level in it and it was my best subject.

    However character wise - I'm rather shy in a sense that I don't like confrontation and arguing. I'm also not one of those people that like leadership but I can be confident if I want to. I've been told I would suit being a nurse as I'm caring, kind and compassionate (I have no interest in nursing). I'm planning to join some societies at uni to help improve my confidence.

    I have no interest in being a barrister, I would love to do something like medical negligence or human rights (solicitor). I am also interested in doing some humanitarian work abroad.
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    In my non expert opinion the UK has largely competent doctors and good human rights...

    so if you work in those areas you're mainly going to be helping sleazebags to try and scam honest people
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    In my non expert opinion the UK has largely competent doctors and good human rights...

    so if you work in those areas you're mainly going to be helping sleazebags to try and scam honest people
    I didn't think of that

    What about family law? what other areas would you suggest?
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    Where are you at the moment? Are you studying law at university, or not yet at university?

    I think it's fair to say that if you like law as a subject but you haven't yet gone to university then you shouldn't rule it out. Your character and self-confidence will change a lot at university so you shouldn't assume that the person you will be in 3 or 4 years' time, will be the same person you are now.

    Not all types of lawyer need to go to court, or even get into particularly confrontational situations. Tax law, company law, banking law, and various types of commercial law can all be quite non-litigious.
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    (Original post by hopefullawyer_)
    This might be a silly question but I'm very much doubting myself whether I am actually suited to being a lawyer.

    I always wanted to do medicine but after doing work experience I found that it's not actually for me. Law has been my plan B since college as I did an A Level in it and it was my best subject.

    However character wise - I'm rather shy in a sense that I don't like confrontation and arguing. I'm also not one of those people that like leadership but I can be confident if I want to. I've been told I would suit being a nurse as I'm caring, kind and compassionate (I have no interest in nursing). I'm planning to join some societies at uni to help improve my confidence.

    I have no interest in being a barrister, I would love to do something like medical negligence or human rights (solicitor). I am also interested in doing some humanitarian work abroad.
    I think you should check out the reality of practising law atm. It's pretty grim.

    Sure, the best people will always do ok, but it seems a lot of competition and work for relatively low pay for most.
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    (Original post by Crumpet1)
    Where are you at the moment? Are you studying law at university, or not yet at university?

    I think it's fair to say that if you like law as a subject but you haven't yet gone to university then you shouldn't rule it out. Your character and self-confidence will change a lot at university so you shouldn't assume that the person you will be in 3 or 4 years' time, will be the same person you are now.

    Not all types of lawyer need to go to court, or even get into particularly confrontational situations. Tax law, company law, banking law, and various types of commercial law can all be quite non-litigious.
    I finished college, on a gap year now as I wasn't sure what I want to do and I'm getting my UCAS done.

    It's the only subject that I think I would enjoy. I was always good at humanities but I can't imagine myself doing something like History or English.

    Thank you
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    (Original post by Trinculo)
    I think you should check out the reality of practising law atm. It's pretty grim.

    Sure, the best people will always do ok, but it seems a lot of competition and work for relatively low pay for most.

    I think that's the case with pretty much every subject though? Of course apart from things like medicine, engineering etc. which I'm not interested in
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    (Original post by hopefullawyer_)
    I think that's the case with pretty much every subject though? Of course apart from things like medicine, engineering etc. which I'm not interested in
    Not really - law is exceptionally competitive and expensive. To practise as a solicitor, you have to have a Qualifying Law degree, have been to law school to take the Legal Practice Course, and you have to be taken on by a firm as a two-year trainee.

    To get the QLD, you have to either take an approve law degree - or any degree and then a conversion course at law school.

    You're looking at costs of maybe £40-60,000 in tuition alone with absolutely no guarantee of a job at the end - competing for a finite number of training places against not only your own cohort, but all the people taking conversion and all the people who haven't got training in previous years too.

    For a high street firm out of London, at the end of this all you could be earning not enough to have to pay back your student loan.

    There's a free market in law school courses - it's not like medicine where the number of medicine places are controlled. There are an almost unlimited number of people potentially trying to enter the legal profession.
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    Law is a course which does not require an interview therefore the university will not see your true character as they will only judge it based on what you have written in your personal statement and what the school has written about you in your reference. However, you may avoid this and hide from the Admission Tutors but you are signing yourself up for 3 years of tough studies (aka Law) therefore you will need to find a way to express the character which would suit someone who wants to be a Lawyer and show that true passion for the subject...
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    In my non expert opinion the UK has largely competent doctors and good human rights...

    so if you work in those areas you're mainly going to be helping sleazebags to try and scam honest people
    I don't know why people like you exist. To comment on things you know nothing about.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    I don't know why people like you exist. To comment on things you know nothing about.
    Haha I did think surely we still need medical negligence lawyers, doctors make mistakes
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    (Original post by hopefullawyer_)
    This might be a silly question but I'm very much doubting myself whether I am actually suited to being a lawyer.

    I always wanted to do medicine but after doing work experience I found that it's not actually for me. Law has been my plan B since college as I did an A Level in it and it was my best subject.

    However character wise - I'm rather shy in a sense that I don't like confrontation and arguing. I'm also not one of those people that like leadership but I can be confident if I want to. I've been told I would suit being a nurse as I'm caring, kind and compassionate (I have no interest in nursing). I'm planning to join some societies at uni to help improve my confidence.

    I have no interest in being a barrister, I would love to do something like medical negligence or human rights (solicitor). I am also interested in doing some humanitarian work abroad.
    Hey dont worry. If you can get the grades, then theres no reason you cant become a lawyer or practice in he areas you suggest.

    Even if you are a bit shy now, then you are young and can change as well as improve your self confidence. As long as you arent at the extreme , but are able to interact as well as be confident in the points/ advice you give, because you know you are correct, then theres plenty of scope to make a career.

    Plenty of areas are non contentious, but they will require you to be able to interact with colleagues and clients. You can learn all that. I wouldn't worry if you really want it, then go for it. Maybe try and get some experience in a firm which does Medical Negligence or Human Rights?
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Hey dont worry. If you can get the grades, then theres no reason you cant become a lawyer or practice in he areas you suggest.

    Even if you are a bit shy now, then you are young and can change as well as improve your self confidence. As long as you arent at the extreme , but are able to interact as well as be confident in the points/ advice you give, because you know you are correct, then theres plenty of scope to make a career.

    Plenty of areas are non contentious, but they will require you to be able to interact with colleagues and clients. You can learn all that. I wouldn't worry if you really want it, then go for it. Maybe try and get some experience in a firm which does Medical Negligence or Human Rights?
    Thank you!

    I'm not that shy at all, I did plenty of work experience at hospitals where I had to interact with people all the time, I'm just worried about things like mock trials which I know some unis do or presenting in front of a large group of people. I have no problem with interacting with people its more of an issue of 'arguing' a case for example.

    I arranged to spend a week with a Medical Negligence solicitor next month
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    (Original post by hopefullawyer_)
    Thank you!

    I'm not that shy at all, I did plenty of work experience at hospitals where I had to interact with people all the time, I'm just worried about things like mock trials which I know some unis do or presenting in front of a large group of people. I have no problem with interacting with people its more of an issue of 'arguing' a case for example.

    I arranged to spend a week with a Medical Negligence solicitor next month
    You will be fine.Only a small % do advocacy work. Do some research on what different lawyers do.

    the lawyers that I know have a range of personalities, but they are all methodical problem solvers who have an opinion. Doesnt seem theres much reason for you to worry.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    I don't know why people like you exist. To comment on things you know nothing about.
    Yeah probably it's all rainbow unicorns and magical pixies :unsure:

    If OP had said they were unempathetic, highly motivated by money and not really bothered about ethics providing they win I wouldn't have said anything. One day the NHS might chop the wrong leg off me by mistake and that'd be just the sort of lawyer I'd want to call.
    ---
    anyway.

    Medical malpractice is likely to become less lucrative.

    ...
    https://www.gov.uk/government/news/p...gligence-cases

    Legal firms will face a new cap on the amount of costs they can recover in negligence cases.


    The government intends to impose a new, fixed cap on all clinical negligence cases up to £25,000 to prevent rising litigation costs within the NHS. There are numerous examples of lawyers who profit from the NHS by charging more than 80 times the amount awarded to the victims in minor claims.

    In one case, lawyers claimed £83,000 in legal costs for a case in which the patient was awarded £1,000. These costs contributed to a total bill for the NHS of £1.5 billion in financial year 2015 to 2016.



    ...
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    Yeah probably it's all rainbow unicorns and magical pixies :unsure:

    If OP had said they were unempathetic, highly motivated by money and not really bothered about ethics providing they win I wouldn't have said anything. One day the NHS might chop the wrong leg off me by mistake and that'd be just the sort of lawyer I'd want to call.
    ---
    anyway.

    Medical malpractice is likely to become less lucrative.

    ...
    https://www.gov.uk/government/news/p...gligence-cases

    Legal firms will face a new cap on the amount of costs they can recover in negligence cases.


    The government intends to impose a new, fixed cap on all clinical negligence cases up to £25,000 to prevent rising litigation costs within the NHS. There are numerous examples of lawyers who profit from the NHS by charging more than 80 times the amount awarded to the victims in minor claims.

    In one case, lawyers claimed £83,000 in legal costs for a case in which the patient was awarded £1,000. These costs contributed to a total bill for the NHS of £1.5 billion in financial year 2015 to 2016.


    ...
    Your first point was about the claimants being sleazebags and this has now changed to lawyers being sleazebags. Talk about moving the goal posts.

    Anyway, this is a rather underdeveloped point because, given the changes in the law, OP would not now have an opportunity to lay down extortionate fees or to be a sleazebag. If anything, the new changes illustrate that OP's chosen specialism is for the saintly only.
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    There are plenty of careers that you can go into with a law degree, even if ultimately you do not go into law as a career. Employers like law degrees, it is a degree that teaches students how to think and analyse. So I would not view your current personality as a barrier either to studying law, or to a legal career at this stage. Your confidence may well improve at university. Go for it if you are interested in law as a subject.

    On the other hand your A'level grades (which you have not specified) may be more of a barrier to a legal career. Many solicitors firms look for about ABB minimum. If you don't have that, then by all means still study law at university, but in the longer term don't put all your eggs into the legal career basket.
 
 
 
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