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Do Oxford LLM graduates have a higher chance of getting a training contract? Watch

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    I remember that It was everyone's dream to study at Oxford University, it seemed like you could do anything you want if you are an Oxford graduate.

    However now as an adult I have friends and family members who have been to Oxford and are doing normal jobs.
    I mean good jobs still but nothing special, in fact I see about thousands of friends Facebook profiles stating "studied at Oxford" or "studying at Oxford".

    It makes me wonder if this was true and all these people have been to this uni, will it be any different for Oxford LLM graduates vs LLB/LLM graduate (From other universities) to secure a TC?
    How different it is for both senses it's a competitive route anyways?
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    No just because you study at Oxford does not mean you will have higher chances... Most people who attend average universities are far better at the job than Oxford graduates so they will be competition as well!
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    I'm curious about this too! I'm hoping to do a masters at Oxbridge at some point
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    Oxford doesn't offer the LLM. It does the Bachelor of Civil Law degree.

    It is the premier postgrad law degree, perhaps, in the common law world. It makes the person vastly more employable, and more likely to succeed at the bar (solicitors do not take the degree as often). However, this is a law degree and a particularly sought-after one at that; it is therefore not comparable to an MSt in English Literature or the Classics.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    Oxford doesn't offer the LLM. It does the Bachelor of Civil Law degree.

    It is the premier postgrad law degree, perhaps, in the common law world. It makes the person vastly more employable, and more likely to succeed at the bar (solicitors do not take the degree as often). However, this is a law degree and a particularly sought-after one at that; it is therefore not comparable to an MSt in English Literature or the Classics.
    Cambridge offers the LLM, am I correct?
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    (Original post by rnv)
    Cambridge offers the LLM, am I correct?
    Yep.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    Oxford doesn't offer the LLM. It does the Bachelor of Civil Law degree.

    It is the premier postgrad law degree, perhaps, in the common law world. It makes the person vastly more employable, and more likely to succeed at the bar (solicitors do not take the degree as often). However, this is a law degree and a particularly sought-after one at that; it is therefore not comparable to an MSt in English Literature or the Classics.
    Plus loads of other masters courses, including its M I L F course (did that really just get censored ), just non are branded as an LLM. But its all just a name/title, in the same way its undergrad course is not an LLB.
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    (Original post by MonoMikey)
    No just because you study at Oxford does not mean you will have higher chances... Most people who attend average universities are far better at the job than Oxford graduates so they will be competition as well!
    Do you really think that in 3-4 years of study, people that were significantly less academically-able will somehow (on average) overtake them? The fact is, if you're good enough to get into a top university, you're likely to be academically better when you finish. There are other important aspects to job performance, and I've hired and worked with a few very good people from non-"top" universities, but, in general, your assertion is BS.
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    Ignoring your getting the letters a bit wrong, OP, most Oxbridge grads find it pretty easy to get a TC. Not even because of the degree, just because they're the best candidates in the first place.
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    (Original post by UNSAID)
    I remember that It was everyone's dream to study at Oxford University, it seemed like you could do anything you want if you are an Oxford graduate.

    However now as an adult I have friends and family members who have been to Oxford and are doing normal jobs.
    I mean good jobs still but nothing special, in fact I see about thousands of friends Facebook profiles stating "studied at Oxford" or "studying at Oxford".

    It makes me wonder if this was true and all these people have been to this uni, will it be any different for Oxford LLM graduates vs LLB/LLM graduate (From other universities) to secure a TC?
    How different it is for both senses it's a competitive route anyways?
    This isn't as simple as it seems. Many people of the BCL and Masters in Law & Finance course at Oxford are qualified lawyers/barristers, typically from other jursidictions, so they wouldn't be looking for a training contract. Some have taken a sabbitical from their job and return to their job as a lawyer/barrister.

    Some on those courses have already secured training contracts too - I know of a few people I deferred the start of their training contract where they got a place on the BCL.

    And for those who haven't secured a job, particularly for the BCL, they are often choosing the barrister route instead.

    So you just don't actually get a lot of BCL students applying for training contracts with firms. When you do they are either exceptional applicants or woefully poor where they haven't really got the motivation for a TC.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Plus loads of other masters courses, including its M I L F course (did that really just get censored ), just non are branded as an LLM. But its all just a name/title, in the same way its undergrad course is not an LLB.
    You did mother I would like to **** on purpose, you! Can't take you anywhere.

    It does have other postgrad courses in law, but for the most part the BCL is the LLM equivalent.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    You did mother I would like to **** on purpose, you! Can't take you anywhere.

    It does have other postgrad courses in law, but for the most part the BCL is the LLM equivalent.
    It is a long running joke where I was involved in discussions with senior partners about getting involved in the course/spending ridiculous amounts of money sponsoring it etc. Needless to say it was the Cambridge partners who always referred to it by that acronym, and some funny stories of it being overheard by some "older" partners who then went on to use the term at some important "give us your money" dinners at Oxford, not knowing the meaning to most people under the age of 50 (and it then being explained to them).
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    Ignoring your getting the letters a bit wrong, OP, most Oxbridge grads find it pretty easy to get a TC. Not even because of the degree, just because they're the best candidates in the first place.
    Well, that's a completely different story. Here we are talking about postgrad-grads rather than those who have simply completed their undergrad at Oxbridge. Sometimes people take a place on the master's course, from non-Oxbridge unis, after an unsuccessful round of TC apps. A couple from my cohort did this. Clearly, being good enough to be selected for the PG courses at Oxbridge does not make you good enough to fly through TC apps. Once they have the LLM (Cantab) post-nominals, maybe it becomes a different story.

    Even for Oxbridge undergrads, there are a few I know who've taken a year out and tried to get experience in finance/business because they have not been able to get TC offers. And this is even for SC and below firms.
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    (Original post by RogerOxon)
    Do you really think that in 3-4 years of study, people that were significantly less academically-able will somehow (on average) overtake them? The fact is, if you're good enough to get into a top university, you're likely to be academically better when you finish. There are other important aspects to job performance, and I've hired and worked with a few very good people from non-"top" universities, but, in general, your assertion is BS.
    Just because you go Oxford doesn't make you the best Lawyer on Earth... its an academic university so you are an academic when you finish it therefore universities which train their candidates at a level which makes them more competent at their job will be better in practice than those who just sat in books their whole life. Law firms are not looking for people who can write the best essay or who have the most A*... They are after people who will make them money that's it.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    Well, that's a completely different story. Here we are talking about postgrad-grads rather than those who have simply completed their undergrad at Oxbridge. Sometimes people take a place on the master's course, from non-Oxbridge unis, after an unsuccessful round of TC apps. A couple from my cohort did this. Clearly, being good enough to be selected for the PG courses at Oxbridge does not make you good enough to fly through TC apps. Once they have the LLM (Cantab) post-nominals, maybe it becomes a different story.

    Even for Oxbridge undergrads, there are a few I know who've taken a year out and tried to get experience in finance/business because they have not been able to get TC offers. And this is even for SC and below firms.
    I take the point, although taking the OP as a whole I'm not sure it's best approached with such a strict focus. Of course law firms and Oxbridge postgrad admissions tutors are looking for different things.

    Re your second para, I'm sure that has happened but I haven't come across it IRL (seen an example or two on here). Of course that's not typical, and is the reason I used the word 'most'. (For law graduates anyway; I've no real direct knowledge of what is typical for non-law graduates.)
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    (Original post by MonoMikey)
    Just because you go Oxford doesn't make you the best Lawyer on Earth...
    I never said that it did. It will, on average, produce ones that are better academically, as they were when they started.

    its an academic university
    I would hope that most are for Law.

    therefore universities which train their candidates at a level which makes them more competent at their job will be better in practice than those who just sat in books their whole life.
    Do you think that being less academically able is ever an advantage, or that being more academically able is ever a disadvantage?

    Law firms are not looking for people who can write the best essay or who have the most A*... They are after people who will make them money that's it.
    Are you claiming that law graduate from 'average' universities earn more?
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    I take the point, although taking the OP as a whole I'm not sure it's best approached with such a strict focus. Of course law firms and Oxbridge postgrad admissions tutors are looking for different things.

    Re your second para, I'm sure that has happened but I haven't come across it IRL (seen an example or two on here). Of course that's not typical, and is the reason I used the word 'most'. (For law graduates anyway; I've no real direct knowledge of what is typical for non-law graduates.)
    Second para. I accept your use of most. I was just trying to explain that its being easy peasy lemon squeezy isn't shared by some. I would argue that there is still some graft involved to secure the TC, as some of your Oxbridge peers struggle, making it necessarily not easy per se. "Easier" is probably a fairer word. I wonder if you would agree.
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    I have said it many times before, but I regularly rejected more Oxford or Cambridge students than from any other university. But I recruited more from those universities too.
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    (Original post by MonoMikey)
    No just because you study at Oxford does not mean you will have higher chances... Most people who attend average universities are far better at the job than Oxford graduates so they will be competition as well!
    "Most people who attend average universities are far better at the job that Oxford graduates"

    Interesting, and incorrect statement.
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    (Original post by FloralHybrid)
    "Most people who attend average universities are far better at the job that Oxford graduates"

    Interesting, and incorrect statement.
    When it comes to working for firms like the magic circle and accounting firms...the applicants in the final stages are all top of the year and from top unis across UK but most don't even make it there as they are better at academics than them
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