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How would you do in an Oxford interview? Watch

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    (Original post by Sonechka)
    However, that may be useful, depending on what the poet intends to achieve.
    Please expand on this. What could the poet be intending to achieve by giving the reader a fixed interpretation?

    Also, do you think this technique is specific to poetry or does it extend to other types of writing?

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    This is my Oxbridge modern languages interviewer audition,
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Which subject?

    Did you check the link:
    https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/unde...content-tab--4
    Biological Science. Those are the same questions that have been there for ages. I wish I hadn't looked at those questions ages ago when I was thinking about applying because now that I've seen them, I can't really use them for practise.
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Har! har!



    What do pirates apply to UCAS to study?

    Arrrrrrchitecture.


    What is a pirate's favourite social media site?

    TSArrr
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    (Original post by BrasenoseAdm)
    What do pirates apply to UCAS to study?

    Arrrrrrchitecture.


    What is a pirate's favourite social media site?

    TSArrr
    I was going to award you a pity rep but you are on P-arrrrr-SOM.
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    (Original post by Notnek)
    Please expand on this. What could the poet be intending to achieve by giving the reader a fixed interpretation?

    Also, do you think this technique is specific to poetry or does it extend to other types of writing?

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    This is my Oxbridge modern languages interviewer audition,

    Two things come to mind: firstly, detachment in a Brechtian sense (so the reader wouldn't be musing about all the different possibilities and would be less engaged in the story; they would just watch the poem unfold unambiguously) so that the reader can have a clear-eyed view of the poem and what commentary the poet is making. Secondly, if a situation is being portrayed as black and white or clear-cut, it is helpful for the writing style of the poem to mimic this simplicity.

    I do feel that poets have an increased ability to play with ambiguity due to features like meter and more syntactical freedom, which can make poetry more difficult to understand than prose. It works both ways, though; a consistent rhyme scheme, for instance, can make a poem very easy to follow and understand (hence why children's books are often in verse).
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Oxford have released another batch of interview questions. How well would you do?

    Classics: Why do you think Dido kills herself in Aeneid 4? Couldn’t she just have gone back to her old life?
    Spoileeeers! :P

    The question for my subject (History) is really hard and honestly I would have been stumped. I'm not good at politics related questions, I never know what to say. I would be able to answer the first half (I'd say yes, because organised violence has a motive and other than purely personal motives, most things have some form of political link).
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    (Original post by Sonechka)
    Two things come to mind: firstly, detachment in a Brechtian sense (so the reader wouldn't be musing about all the different possibilities and would be less engaged in the story; they would just watch the poem unfold unambiguously) so that the reader can have a clear-eyed view of the poem and what commentary the poet is making. Secondly, if a situation is being portrayed as black and white or clear-cut, it is helpful for the writing style of the poem to mimic this simplicity.

    I do feel that poets have an increased ability to play with ambiguity due to features like meter and more syntactical freedom, which can make poetry more difficult to understand than prose. It works both ways, though; a consistent rhyme scheme, for instance, can make a poem very easy to follow and understand (hence why children's books are often in verse).
    That's a great answer. Unfortunately, Oxford is full.
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    You'd be fine - she's terrible at maths.

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    I have no idea if this is true!

    And I guess a similar double-take would occur if Mary Beard, David Starkey or similar turned up. Grief, imagine being interviewed by Starkey...

    Oh gosh I would DIE if Mary Beard was my interviewer, thankfully she teaches at Cambridge! Though, looking it up, one of my best friends is applying for Classics at Newnham....she would probably cry meeting Mary Beard. She loves SPQR.
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    (Original post by StevetheIcecube)
    Oh gosh I would DIE if Mary Beard was my interviewer, thankfully she teaches at Cambridge! Though, looking it up, one of my best friends is applying for Classics at Newnham....she would probably cry meeting Mary Beard. She loves SPQR.
    Yeah I know. I was thinking about Oxbridge generally

    Maybe Cambridge could lend you Stephen Hawking, after all he did his foundation year or something at the other place...

    Who are the celeb lecturers teaching at Oxford?


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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Yeah I know. I was thinking about Oxbridge generally

    Maybe Cambridge could lend you Stephen Hawking, after all he did his foundation year or something at the other place...

    Who are the celeb lecturers teaching at Oxford?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I can't think of any offhand and all the books I've been reading are from Cambridge academics, oops! I need to find something written by an Oxford lecturer quickly, it seems.......
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    (Original post by StevetheIcecube)
    I can't think of any offhand and all the books I've been reading are from Cambridge academics, oops! I need to find something written by an Oxford lecturer quickly, it seems.......
    So Cambridge > Oxford. This is known...
    The_Lonely_Goatherd
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    (Original post by Notnek)
    That's a great answer. Unfortunately, Oxford is full.
    Thankfully, I'm actually applying to Cambridge :lol: (not that I didn't post in the Oxford 2019 thread anyway...)
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    (Original post by StevetheIcecube)
    Spoileeeers! :P

    The question for my subject (History) is really hard and honestly I would have been stumped. I'm not good at politics related questions, I never know what to say. I would be able to answer the first half (I'd say yes, because organised violence has a motive and other than purely personal motives, most things have some form of political link).
    I would say the answer depends on which you perspective you approach it from, as there are the various different players involved in conflict. For example, those who are high up in the social heirachy from their perspective violence is political an example is the Crusades which was political for the Pope, but not for most Crusaders who were fighting.
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    (Original post by BrasenoseAdm)
    What do pirates apply to UCAS to study?

    Arrrrrrchitecture.


    What is a pirate's favourite social media site?

    TSArrr
    What is a pirates favourite topic in Maths?

    The Aaargand diagram
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    (Original post by SuperHuman98)
    I would say the answer depends on which you perspective you approach it from, as there are the various different players involved in conflict. For example, those who are high up in the social heirachy from their perspective violence is political an example is the Crusades which was political for the Pope, but not for most Crusaders who were fighting.
    Someone is getting into Oxford and it isn't me :P

    I was thinking more in the context of modern history - eg general strikes in Italy in the early 20th century. The strike is, at a glance, economic; the people striking want to be paid better and they want rights while working. But they were also striking in support of the socialists, and a particular angle to socialism. (And yes, this was violence - some groups forcibly occupied their factories/declared whole cities independent from the state and they fought back when attacked)
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    Pirates favourite author: Aaaargatha Christie
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    25 gold coins each for the 4 most senior pirates.
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    So Cambridge > Oxford. This is known...
    The_Lonely_Goatherd
    :nothing:
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Oxford have released another batch of interview questions. How well would you do?

    Classics: Why do you think Dido kills herself in Aeneid 4? Couldn’t she just have gone back to her old life?
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    Interviewer: Gail Trimble, Trinity College
    I would never ask a question like this without the student mentioning the text first, as we don’t assume that all applicants will have read the same things. Many candidates have never studied Latin or Greek before at all, so we certainly wouldn’t assume that they had any particular knowledge. I would open this part of the interview by asking the applicant to choose a Classical text that they have enjoyed. This could be something they have read at school/college or on their own, in the original or in translation – it just needs to be something that they found interesting and that they would be happy to discuss.





    Computer Science: How do pirates divide their treasure?
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    A group of 7 pirates has 100 gold coins. They have to decide amongst themselves how to divide the treasure, but must abide by pirate rules:
    • The most senior pirate proposes the division.
    • All of the pirates (including the most senior) vote on the division. If half or more vote for the division, it stands. If less than half vote for it, they throw the most senior pirate overboard and start again.
    • The pirates are perfectly logical, and entirely ruthless (only caring about maximizing their own share of the gold).
    • So, what division should the most senior pirate suggest to the other six?






    Engineering: The ruler
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    Place a 30cm ruler on top of one finger from each hand so that you have one finger at each end of the ruler, and the ruler is resting on your fingertips. What happens when you bring your fingers together?





    History: Is violence always political? Does 'political' mean something different in different contexts?
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    This pair of questions allows the interviewer to deal with historical material from any period the candidate is studying or knows about from more general reading. It could also be answered extremely well from contemporary or current affairs knowledge. The aim of the question is to get the candidate to challenge some received notions about what constitutes politics, and to think about how political history might be studied away from the usual kings, parliaments etc. A good candidate would, with assistance, begin to construct categories of when violence looks more and less political. A very good candidate would, with assistance, begin to construct a useful definition of 'political', but this is challenging. The main aim would not be to solve these problems, but to use them to find some new interest in a subject that the candidate already knows something about.






    Medicine: Put these countries in order by their crude mortality (deaths per thousand of the population): Bangladesh, Japan, South Africa, the UK.
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    Interviews for Medicine aim to gauge candidates' understanding of the science underpinning the study of medicine, as well as skills in scientific enquiry. This question invites candidates to think about a public health question and epidemiology that can be approached in many different ways, without necessarily knowing anything about specific mortality rates around the world. We would expect the initial discussion to probe the differing causes of death that contribute to mortality rates – such as those 'Western diseases' heart disease and cancer – and how they compare to those found in developing countries (high infant mortality, infectious diseases, poor nutrition, high rates of HIV etc.).






    Modern Languages: Should poetry be difficult to understand?
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    This question arose out of discussion of a few poems that a candidate said he had read, and we were talking through how these poems were conveying meaning (through things such as tone and the imagery they used). We wanted to push the candidate into more conceptual thinking to test his intellectual curiosity and how he would handle moving from familiar particulars (the poems he knew) to less familiar ways of approaching them. What's important for candidates to realise is that we don't expect a single correct answer to such a question; it's a starting point for a new direction of discussion: what sorts of 'difficulties' might we have in mind? Are these specific to poetry or do they also feature in other types of writing? And so on.






    PPE: Are our deaths bad for us?
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    Interviewer: Tim Mawson, St Peter's College
    I quite like this question because whichever way one answers it, new questions open up. One can distinguish between the process of dying and the state of being dead. The first seems non-problematically something that might well be bad for us (involving suffering), but the second is harder to assess – not least because one can have differing understandings of what the state of being dead is: is it permanent annihilation? Is it somehow waiting unconscious for a resurrection? Is to die simply to be transported instantaneously to some new realm? Or is it something else again? And can one know which? Whichever way the discussion goes, interesting topics branch off. These can include the nature of the self and personal identity; the rationality (or otherwise) of religious beliefs.





    NB. Often there's no right or wrong answer - it's your thinking they are interested in.

    More questions (and some answers to the above) here:
    https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/unde...content-tab--4
    I would seemingly get the medicine question right , the others probably not.
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Pirates favourite author: Aaaargatha Christie
    Did you post that after seeing my deleted posts above yours (that was meant for another thread)?

    If not, that’s a weird coincidence.
 
 
 
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