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Could the EU have easily prevented Brexit? Watch

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    By giving David Cameron some meaningful concessions when he went to the EU with his renegotiation strategy. Even when the Brexit referendum was in campaign mode the EU could have made a meaningful gesture.

    I struggle to believe that the 51% wanted to leave the EU at all costs. I suspect most were unhappy with the current deal and some meaningful concessions by the EU may have swayed them to vote remain.
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    It's simple really, people don't like the way the EU is becoming, and the EU brushes off genuine concerns with their favourite weaponry: political correctness.
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    If the EU gave concessions to the UK, other countries will also ask for concessions until every country pulls in different directions and the EU falls apart.
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    The problem is more that British politicians spent decades lying about the EU to hide their own inadequacies. The most important case is immigration. They could have bought in a registration system so we knew who was coming here, how many there were and where they were living. They could have restricted their access to benefits until they'd paid in to the national insurance system (so long as that same principle applied to British people). The truth is that they simply didn't want to, so they lied and said the EU didn't let them. Then people turned around and said "well why not leave the EU then?", and these same politicians had the gall to criticise them for being misinformed when it was they who'd spread the misinformation.
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    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    The problem is more that British politicians spent decades lying about the EU to hide their own inadequacies. The most important case is immigration. They could have bought in a registration system so we knew who was coming here, how many there were and where they were living. They could have restricted their access to benefits until they'd paid in to the national insurance system (so long as that same principle applied to British people). The truth is that they simply didn't want to, so they lied and said the EU didn't let them. Then people turned around and said "well why not leave the EU then?", and these same politicians had the gall to criticise them for being misinformed when it was they who'd spread the misinformation.
    You are right about the EU being a deflection target for the UK's inadequate politicians. So once those same politicians waved the "Get Out Of EU" card, they would've also known that their deflection target would be taken away from them, leaving their deficiencies widely exposed.
    Though that said, where were all the votes that could've removed Blair from power in 2001 before he was able to commit to Iraq and that disastrous open door policy? It's a shame that elections only elect what politicians say they do, not what they think they can do.
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    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    so long as that same principle applied to British people
    You think that's acceptable?
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    (Original post by D3LLI5)
    You think that's acceptable?
    You could make it, for instance, so that you could "borrow" NI contributions from your parents/grandparents so that in reality no British person would have trouble getting benefits if that's what you wanted. There are ways and means of doing things.
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    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    The problem is more that British politicians spent decades lying about the EU to hide their own inadequacies. The most important case is immigration. They could have bought in a registration system so we knew who was coming here, how many there were and where they were living. They could have restricted their access to benefits until they'd paid in to the national insurance system (so long as that same principle applied to British people). The truth is that they simply didn't want to, so they lied and said the EU didn't let them. Then people turned around and said "well why not leave the EU then?", and these same politicians had the gall to criticise them for being misinformed when it was they who'd spread the misinformation.
    I think this is largely unfair. The EU objectively did require the UK to do unpopular things and prevented us from doing things which might have been popular. When the interests of politicians and the EU aligned against popular opinion, the politicians found it expedient to cast the blame solely on the EU, because they didn't want to cop the heat themselves.

    Whilst this might be morally dubious, it doesn't really invalidate the idea that EU required things which might otherwise have been politically difficult. If anything it's an example of how EU membership was used by elites as a way of overriding democratic opinion.

    I personally doubt a registration system or restricted benefits would have had much of an impact on opinions of immigration. A registration could conceivably have made matters worse, and restricting the benefits of British people, because the EU wouldn't otherwise allow us to deal with migrant benefits, would have added a bucket-load of fuel to the fire.
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    Is there anything in the history of the EU that leads you to believe it is/was capable of change?

    If you look at the behaviour and rhetoric of the top EU people since the referendum, it's exactly the kind of thing that leads people to want to leave. It's a scoffing, bullying, vengeful tone - not the sort of thing that would make you want to be in such a club.
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    (Original post by Iridocyclitis)
    By giving David Cameron some meaningful concessions when he went to the EU with his renegotiation strategy. Even when the Brexit referendum was in campaign mode the EU could have made a meaningful gesture.

    I struggle to believe that the 51% wanted to leave the EU at all costs. I suspect most were unhappy with the current deal and some meaningful concessions by the EU may have swayed them to vote remain.
    If only the real British had voted in the referendum (who are the real British? The ones who have been here for 9000 years) then the Leave vote would have been much higher. It was 67% in Blackpool where there aren't too many invaders .
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    (Original post by avenue321)
    If only the real British had voted in the referendum (who are the real British? The ones who have been here for 9000 years) then the Leave vote would have been much higher. It was 67% in Blackpool where there aren't too many invaders .
    People who have been here for 9000 years would be long dead.
 
 
 
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