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Thinking about medicine when I've already started law Watch

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    (Original post by MollBritton98)
    I’ve applied to HYMS, Sheffield, Newcastle and Leicester, thank you! Are you an applicant?
    nope,if I were I wouldn't have made this thread :P
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    (Original post by OkashiAddict)
    nope,if I were I wouldn't have made this thread :P
    Oh aha, I didn’t realise you were the initial poster!
    What are you thinking now?
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    (Original post by OkashiAddict)
    You clearly didn't read my post. I didn't drop my science A levels because they were hard. I said I left everything to the last minute and it was not possible to learn a whole year's content in a month! The reason for that was because I was suffering from depression the whole year and had no motivation to study at all. I don't want to drop law because it's hard, there's a lot of content but completely doable if I were to put all the work in. My problem is whether I should put all the work in considering my heart isn't completely in it and my future is so uncertain. In terms of career I did not expect the focus to be on commercial law either, an area which I have absolutely no interest in going in to but then if I don't will I find a firm rich enough to help fund my LPC?
    Ok, now you've cleared things up, why is medicine an option? In any case I would say give it a bit longer and then decide if it's worth the time or money. You still don't come across a someone who is passionate about studying medcine for the sake of studying medicine. Just that you aren't sure about what you're doing now and are thinking about the dreams you had as a 16 year old.
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    (Original post by OkashiAddict)
    You clearly didn't read my post. I didn't drop my science A levels because they were hard. I said I left everything to the last minute and it was not possible to learn a whole year's content in a month! The reason for that was because I was suffering from depression the whole year and had no motivation to study at all. I don't want to drop law because it's hard, there's a lot of content but completely doable if I were to put all the work in. My problem is whether I should put all the work in considering my heart isn't completely in it and my future is so uncertain. In terms of career I did not expect the focus to be on commercial law either, an area which I have absolutely no interest in going in to but then if I don't will I find a firm rich enough to help fund my LPC?
    OP are you aware that the SQE will replace the LPC?

    Regardless contact the universities you'd like to go to and ask them if they'd accept you under any circumstances if you were to apply.

    And you'll be able to juggle law school with work experience and volunteering. It won't be easy but if you want it enough you'll have to find the time and energy to do it.

    And where is this commercial focus coming from? First year is core modules that form the basis for many areas of law.
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    (Original post by MollBritton98)
    I was in a similar situation to you a few years ago. I am now currently in my 4th year of a Levels (2 separate 2 year courses) with predicted A*A*A* (and achieved A*AB) and I have just sent my application off.
    I agree with the majority of the posts, Medicine is very competitive! A lot of medical schools won’t consider resits if you fail the first time, also a lot may not consider you if you drop out of another degree as it shows no commitment. You also need a really strong UKCAT which is extremely hard and a lot of experience.
    You should get some experience before dropping out. I’d also look to study a foundation course rather than re-do your a Levels as most unis will not accept this and if you said you struggled with bio and chem the first time there’s really no point. But again these schemes are even more competitive with only a handful of courses and around 20 ish places on each course.
    Medicine is an extremely hard career but extremely interesting and rewarding, I loved my experience and I knew that it was 100% what I wanted to do.
    Honestly you have an uphill climb I would only drop out if you feel you NEED to do medicine rather than want.
    I would continue your degree aim to get a 1st and then look at post grad courses
    So what I'm thinking rn is I want to figure out if med is really for me but also not drop out and take that risk. I'm going to do some work experience and if I really do think it's for me, that's when it comes down to the big decision: re-do a levels or apply for a non science background course such as the one keele offer. It just comes down to what route is more realistic for my situation.
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    (Original post by MollBritton98)
    Oh aha, I didn’t realise you were the initial poster!
    What are you thinking now?
    So what I'm thinking rn is I want to figure out if med is really for me but also not drop out and take that risk. I'm going to do some work experience and if I really do think it's for me, that's when it comes down to the big decision: re-do a levels or apply for a non science background course such as the one keele offer. It just comes down to what route is more realistic for my situation.
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    (Original post by OkashiAddict)
    You clearly didn't read my post. I didn't drop my science A levels because they were hard. I said I left everything to the last minute and it was not possible to learn a whole year's content in a month! The reason for that was because I was suffering from depression the whole year and had no motivation to study at all. I don't want to drop law because it's hard, there's a lot of content but completely doable if I were to put all the work in. My problem is whether I should put all the work in considering my heart isn't completely in it and my future is so uncertain. In terms of career I did not expect the focus to be on commercial law either, an area which I have absolutely no interest in going in to but then if I don't will I find a firm rich enough to help fund my LPC?
    So what area of law do you think you might be attracted to? Just because others on your course are attracted to selling their souls for money, doesn't mean you have to be the same. Once you get on to the optional courses, you can design your own degree according to your interests.
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    (Original post by Crumpet1)
    So what area of law do you think you might be attracted to? Just because others on your course are attracted to selling their souls for money, doesn't mean you have to be the same. Once you get on to the optional courses, you can design your own degree according to your interests.
    The area/ I am attracted to are much less promoted at my uni but they do exist and I think it's knowing this that is motivating me rn to continue with my law degree.
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    (Original post by OkashiAddict)
    So what I'm thinking rn is I want to figure out if med is really for me but also not drop out and take that risk. I'm going to do some work experience and if I really do think it's for me, that's when it comes down to the big decision: re-do a levels or apply for a non science background course such as the one keele offer. It just comes down to what route is more realistic for my situation.
    It also comes down to whether a med school would entertain your application. Keele state:
    "We also do not consider applications from students on degree courses in other subjects who wish to transfer before completing their degree."
    So they would expect you to complete your degree (or be in your final year) before applying for another.
    Most unis have this clause, or something similar, in their admissions policies.
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    (Original post by OkashiAddict)
    So what I'm thinking rn is I want to figure out if med is really for me but also not drop out and take that risk. I'm going to do some work experience and if I really do think it's for me, that's when it comes down to the big decision: re-do a levels or apply for a non science background course such as the one keele offer. It just comes down to what route is more realistic for my situation.
    why not finish law degree and apply for GEM? My friend did law and then applied and got into GEM course.
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    (Original post by Nottie)
    why not finish law degree and apply for GEM? My friend did law and then applied and got into GEM course.
    because it's ridiculously expensive and i'd have wasted all that money on the llb coupled with the fact i have to take out a maintenance loan every year for accommodation
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    (Original post by OkashiAddict)
    because it's ridiculously expensive and i'd have wasted all that money on the llb coupled with the fact i have to take out a maintenance loan every year for accommodation
    yes, but:
    1. you don't even know if you want to do medicine really
    2. you seem reluctant to drop out and waste years trying to get into and then finishing medicine

    You can get into medicine straight from your law degree so no need to take any 'lawyer' exams. My friend did that
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    (Original post by Nottie)
    yes, but:
    1. you don't even know if you want to do medicine really
    2. you seem reluctant to drop out and waste years trying to get into and then finishing medicine

    You can get into medicine straight from your law degree so no need to take any 'lawyer' exams. My friend did that
    what was your friend's route?
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    (Original post by OkashiAddict)
    what was your friend's route?
    undergrad law then straight onto GEM
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    (Original post by OkashiAddict)
    because it's ridiculously expensive and i'd have wasted all that money on the llb coupled with the fact i have to take out a maintenance loan every year for accommodation
    Your options (as far as I can see) are to:

    (1) Complete one year LLB and then five years MBChB. In six years you will only have an MBChB to show at the end of this route.

    (2) Finish the LLB and then join a GEM course. In seven years you will have graduated with a LLB and MBChB, which will be the equivalent of having completed an intercalated degree.

    How does the NHS bursary work now? When I was a GEM student, the NHS bursary paid our tuition fees, mileage/parking expenses, and a bursary that did not have to be repaid. This was for years 2-4. My understanding was that students on 5-year courses didn't receive the bursary for as many years but I might be mistaken and/or this could have changed.

    Either way, one year is neither here nor there in the grand scheme of things. Similarly, accommodation costs for another year of university are not significant in the context of your whole-career earning potential. See this as an investment in your career (which will pay dividends with more certainty than any bond) and not as money spent/wasted.
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)

    How does the NHS bursary work now? When I was a GEM student, the NHS bursary paid our tuition fees, mileage/parking expenses, and a bursary that did not have to be repaid. This was for years 2-4. My understanding was that students on 5-year courses didn't receive the bursary for as many years but I might be mistaken and/or this could have changed.
    GEM is funded by SFE and NHS bursary from years 2-4. You have to pay £3465 in your first year though. This is for every GEM course apart from Imperial's.

    Normal entry medicine isn't funded except for your final year.
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    (Original post by Volibear)
    GEM is funded by SFE and NHS bursary from years 2-4. You have to pay £3465 in your first year though. This is for every GEM course apart from Imperial's. Normal entry medicine isn't funded except for your final year.
    It hasn't really changed then. On that basis it would be hard to recommend anything other than LLB + GEM unless the OP really just doesn't enjoy their current course. This also takes away the problem of not having quite the right A-levels.
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    It hasn't really changed then. On that basis it would be hard to recommend anything other than LLB + GEM unless the OP really just doesn't enjoy their current course. This also takes away the problem of not having quite the right A-levels.
    Actually over the past few days I've been thinking about GEM and like you said it is an investment well worth it. I didn't know anything about the bursary though, thanks for that info!

    I really just want to get through this law degree, not enjoying it so far but hopefully that will change when I get used to it.
 
 
 
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