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    If the civil engineering and construction industries are facing a skills gap and there is a high demand for a qualified workforce with a lot of infrastructure projects coming up, why is it so hard to get a job in it even with relevant qualifications and experiences?
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    What are your qualifications and experiences?
    Are you finding plenty of jobs advertised but failing to secure them? Which stage are you failing at?
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    (Original post by Student-95)
    What are your qualifications and experiences?
    Are you finding plenty of jobs advertised but failing to secure them? Which stage are you failing at?
    Application stage. And if I do get an interview (which seems to happen once every 15-20 applications) again at interview stage.
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    (Original post by Ybsy75)
    Application stage. And if I do get an interview (which seems to happen once every 15-20 applications) again at interview stage.
    What are your qualifications and experiences? And what level jobs are you applying for?
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    (Original post by Student-95)
    What are your qualifications and experiences? And what level jobs are you applying for?
    1 above graduate/entry level jobs. I have 2-3 years experience in an entry level role, but I took on duties of the level above.
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    (Original post by Ybsy75)
    1 above graduate/entry level jobs. I have 2-3 years experience in an entry level role, but I took on duties of the level above.
    Could be that the shortage is for higher level engineers. In chemical engineering there are lots of open jobs for people with 5+ years experience but between grad level and that it's still very competitive.
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    (Original post by Ybsy75)
    1 above graduate/entry level jobs. I have 2-3 years experience in an entry level role, but I took on duties of the level above.
    Getting in the door initially can be hard. I did a Bachelors in Electrical Engineering, which was about the minimum qualification for a job in that area in 1969. My advantage was that i had worked as a 'technician' [what you Uk types insist on calling 'engineers'] for nearly 5 years. Here, in order to be called an 'engineer' you have to have a 4 yr degree at a minimum. Have you considered taking an 'overseas tour'. I went to work for the US Govt right out of Uni, and after about 1.5 years, i signed up for a year in the near east. After a year there, i 're-upped' for a second year. What with my organisation having trouble finding a replacement for me, I ended up being 'extended' for nearly a 3rd year. When i got back, i bought a house with some of the proceeds. Civil Engineering is a little out of my area of expertise, but i would consider trying Bechtel, Boots & Coots, Schlumburger, Oil Well Services Co, etc. I realise that things are slow in the 'oil patch' right now, but they will pick up. Other firms involved in large scale road and construction projects should also be considered. I would expect that most of them would want you to work for them domestically, before shipping you to Bangladesh or elsewere, so they can see how you would fit into an overseas environment. I was living over 400 miles from the nearest 'english speaking anything', and 300 miles from commercial electric power [we had our own generators]. Best of luck!! Try Google [and the other search engines - like Web Ferret - and search for civil engineering firms. Research them, to see what kind of projects they do, and how you would fit into their workforce.
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    (Original post by Rabbit2)
    Getting in the door initially can be hard. I did a Bachelors in Electrical Engineering, which was about the minimum qualification for a job in that area in 1969. My advantage was that i had worked as a 'technician' [what you Uk types insist on calling 'engineers'] for nearly 5 years. Here, in order to be called an 'engineer' you have to have a 4 yr degree at a minimum. Have you considered taking an 'overseas tour'. I went to work for the US Govt right out of Uni, and after about 1.5 years, i signed up for a year in the near east. After a year there, i 're-upped' for a second year. What with my organisation having trouble finding a replacement for me, I ended up being 'extended' for nearly a 3rd year. When i got back, i bought a house with some of the proceeds. Civil Engineering is a little out of my area of expertise, but i would consider trying Bechtel, Boots & Coots, Schlumburger, Oil Well Services Co, etc. I realise that things are slow in the 'oil patch' right now, but they will pick up. Other firms involved in large scale road and construction projects should also be considered. I would expect that most of them would want you to work for them domestically, before shipping you to Bangladesh or elsewere, so they can see how you would fit into an overseas environment. I was living over 400 miles from the nearest 'english speaking anything', and 300 miles from commercial electric power [we had our own generators]. Best of luck!! Try Google [and the other search engines - like Web Ferret - and search for civil engineering firms. Research them, to see what kind of projects they do, and how you would fit into their workforce.
    But I’ve already worked within a civil engineering and construction environment so I don’t understand why it’s so hard.
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    (Original post by Ybsy75)
    But I’ve already worked within a civil engineering and construction environment so I don’t understand why it’s so hard.
    Well, perhaps the question to ask, is WHEN did you do that?? It may well have been when the economy was in better shape. Remember that the "shape" the economy is in at any given time, is about 70% perception, and 30% reality. You may have been doing that before Brexit - and some of your potential employers may "perceive" that things are worse now economically.

    An additional factor, may be that you are giving the potential employers 'references' with your paperwork. If so, have you had someone "vet" the references to see that they are not "sandbagging" you?? Get a gal that has worked in an office, and has checked references at some time in her past, to call your references (any that you have given out), and pretend she is a prospective employer. See what they say. IF some of them are being critical, for whatever reason, take them off the list - you don't need that!! A couple of times, i noted that my employers had checked my undergrad degree, in addition to my masters. I asked a HR gal why they had done this, particularly when the undergrad degree was in New England, and hence a toll call and a number they would have to look up somehow, and the graduate degree was in D.C. and local, and they could look up the number in a local phone book that they would have on their desk. She said: "Oh, we check EVERYTHING". 60% or 70% of the resume's [CVs] that we get in, have something phoney on them. I was surprised at this, because it's so easy to check degrees (at least on this side of the pond). Make sure your dates of employment are correct. Best of Luck!!
 
 
 
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