SUVAT for throwing something horizontally Watch

Elliewhitehall
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How do you find the height something is thrown from when you know that it has been thrown horizontally with projection speed 24m/s and hits the ground 4 seconds later ?
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Joinedup
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(Original post by Elliewhitehall)
How do you find the height something is thrown from when you know that it has been thrown horizontally with projection speed 24m/s and hits the ground 4 seconds later ?
How far would an object fall under acceleration due to gravity in 4 seconds?
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Elliewhitehall)
How do you find the height something is thrown from when you know that it has been thrown horizontally with projection speed 24m/s and hits the ground 4 seconds later ?
What have you done so far? Please post your working.
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Elliewhitehall
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(Original post by Muttley79)
What have you done so far? Please post your working.
I have listed the numbers I know. u = 24 , a = 9.81 , t = 4 . I need to know the distance the ball falls after being thrown. I have tried s = ut + 1/2at^2 and that gave the wrong answer (174.5m). The correct answer is 78.5m
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Elliewhitehall)
I have listed the numbers I know. u = 24 , a = 9.81 , t = 4 . I need to know the distance the ball falls after being thrown. I have tried s = ut + 1/2at^2 and that gave the wrong answer (174.5m). The correct answer is 78.5m
It is thown horizontally, gravity acts vertically ...

vert taking downwards as +
u = what ?
a = 9.8
t = 4
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Elliewhitehall
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(Original post by Muttley79)
It is thown horizontally, gravity acts vertically ...

vert taking downwards as +
u = what ?
a = 9.8
t = 4
U = 24 ?
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Elliewhitehall
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(Original post by Elliewhitehall)
U = 24 ?
I did it. U = 0 so s = 74.5m
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Elliewhitehall
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(Original post by Elliewhitehall)
How do you find the height something is thrown from when you know that it has been thrown horizontally with projection speed 24m/s and hits the ground 4 seconds later ?
How would I find the horizontal distance?
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Joinedup
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(Original post by Elliewhitehall)
How would I find the horizontal distance?
How far does a projectile travelling at 24m/s go in 4 seconds?
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Elliewhitehall)
I did it. U = 0 so s = 74.5m
Yes, if it's thrown horizontally then the vertical component of velocity is zero.
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Elliewhitehall
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(Original post by Joinedup)
How far does a projectile travelling at 24m/s go in 4 seconds?
So you would just do it as if the horizontal component was a single particle moving in a straight line horizontally?
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(Original post by Elliewhitehall)
So you would just do it as if the horizontal component was a single particle moving in a straight line horizontally?
Yeah - you treat the vertical and horizontal components of the motion independently.
vertical component is subject to constant acceleration due to gravity
horizontal component is constant speed

if the launch angle isn't vertical or horizontal you'll have to do an additional bit of trig to resolve the initial velocity into it's vertical and horizontal components.
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gurungg48
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(Original post by Elliewhitehall)
How do you find the height something is thrown from when you know that it has been thrown horizontally with projection speed 24m/s and hits the ground 4 seconds later ?
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