When did the Conservative party become progressives? Watch

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Midlander
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#41
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(Original post by Underscore__)
You have a vested interest in the salary of teachers meaning you’re hardly likely to have a reasonable estimation of what teachers should be paid. You know the salary before you start, if you aren’t happy with it you should have picked a different career
And what if we all decide to do that and you don't have enough teachers? I can't believe this is even up for debate, the Tories always say that a full time job provides financial security, but aren't willing to make it so for public sector workers.
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Underscore__
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#42
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(Original post by Midlander)
And what if we all decide to do that and you don't have enough teachers?
That seems rather unlikely so I guess we'll cross that bridge if we ever get to it.

(Original post by Midlander)
I can't believe this is even up for debate, the Tories always say that a full time job provides financial security, but aren't willing to make it so for public sector workers.
Teachers can start on the national average salary despite having more time off than any job I can think of
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RivalPlayer
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#43
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(Original post by Arran90)
The big question is whether the English are prepared to vote for a political party other than Lib-Lab-Con in sufficient numbers to elect enough MPs to change the political landscape. In Scotland the SNP has gone mainstream and Northern Ireland politics have changed since the 1980s, but although there have been a few attempts with some degree of success at challenging the political establishment in England none have broken through on a significant scale yet.
I don't see it changing. That's why the Conservatives can get away with blatantly not being very conservative at all - they know their loyal bunch of mugs will keep voting for them.
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Midlander
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#44
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(Original post by Underscore__)
That seems rather unlikely so I guess we'll cross that bridge if we ever get to it.



Teachers can start on the national average salary despite having more time off than any job I can think of
National average is £27k, teachers start on £22k. Also you have never done the job-in practice I work north of 50 hours a week to manage the workload.

If it's such a doss why do 40% quit in the first 5 years?



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Midlander
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#45
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(Original post by RivalPlayer)
I don't see it changing. That's why the Conservatives can get away with blatantly not being very conservative at all - they know their loyal bunch of mugs will keep voting for them.
Yes Theresa May is progressive of the century.


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Underscore__
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#46
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(Original post by Midlander)
National average is £27k, teachers start on £22k. Also you have never done the job-in practice I work north of 50 hours a week to manage the workload.

If it's such a doss why do 40% quit in the first 5 years?



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https://targetjobs.co.uk/career-sect...s-for-teachers - teachers in London start on £28k, £1k over the national average.

I don’t know why they quit but it’s incredibly dishonest to suggest that it’s because the job is too hard without anything to substantiate it.
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farahhh24
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#47
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interestingly enough, the Conservatives have a pretty progressive history! One-nation Conservativism (also derivingly known as 'bleeding heart Conservatism' for those who think equality and support for poor people is too idealistic) was the theme of the Conservative party up until Margaret Thatcher came into power.

this type of Conservatives heavily supported wealth redistribution and helping people out of poverty. Thatcher, as pretty much everyone knows, is very right-wing, and so was John Mayor after her. It wasn't until David Cameron came into power that a true, effective detoxifying of the Conservative Party took place
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Napp
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#48
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It's just a squalid bit of vote grubbing.
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icequeenTM
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#49
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Simply consumerist politics.

Wouldn’t call it progressive.
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Just my opinion
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#50
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When did the Conservative party become progressives?

Around about the time the left became regressives?
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TheBomber09
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#51
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Trans is an mental illness, if you compared gender dysmorphia to body dysmorphiaone is called Anorexia whilst the other is called being progressive. Personally I don't see the difference
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Kenneth56
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#52
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IMHO

The BBC was giving the Conservatives a hard time during the John Major government and in 2002 Theresa May referred to the Conservatives as the "nasty party" reflecting the reality that the propaganda was damaging the Conservatives,

The BBC was way too powerful and so the Conservatives have tried to become "BBC-friendly" and have been operating that way every since.
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username3672344
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#53
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(Original post by Kenneth56)
IMHO

The BBC was giving the Conservatives a hard time during the John Major government and in 2002 Theresa May referred to the Conservatives as the "nasty party" reflecting the reality that the propaganda was damaging the Conservatives,

The BBC was way too powerful and so the Conservatives have tried to become "BBC-friendly" and have been operating that way every since.
The notion that the BBC is this far left propaganda machine which hates the Tories, is absolutely laughable.

It's very pro tory when it comes to economic issues.
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Kenneth56
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#54
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(Original post by DeBruyne18)
The notion that the BBC is this far left propaganda machine which hates the Tories, is absolutely laughable.

It's very pro tory when it comes to economic issues.
I have never heard an interview at the BBC where a question like "why should taxpayers need to pay for this?" is asked (except for the royal family).

The direction of travel and the pressure is always the other way around with all questions similar to "why isn't the government putting sufficient money in".
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username3672344
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#55
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(Original post by Kenneth56)
I have never heard an interview at the BBC where a question like "why should taxpayers need to pay for this?" is asked (except for the royal family).

The direction of travel and the pressure is always the other way around with all questions similar to "why isn't the government putting sufficient money in".
The BBC have been very pro-tory economically and presented them as economically competent whereas they consistently describe Labour as reckless.
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Midlander
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#56
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(Original post by Underscore__)
https://targetjobs.co.uk/career-sect...s-for-teachers - teachers in London start on £28k, £1k over the national average.

I don’t know why they quit but it’s incredibly dishonest to suggest that it’s because the job is too hard without anything to substantiate it.
Yes because of astronomical living costs in London which make that salary a necessity. Don't take my word for it, take the countless surveys of teachers citing a) workload and b) behaviour as the primary reasons for poor retention.

Outside London, it will take an NQT about 3 years to get to the UK average. Some reward for people with a degree, professional training and a post-graduate qualification providing an invaluable service to the state.
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Underscore__
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#57
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(Original post by Midlander)
Yes because of astronomical living costs in London which make that salary a necessity. Don't take my word for it, take the countless surveys of teachers citing a) workload and b) behaviour as the primary reasons for poor retention.

Outside London, it will take an NQT about 3 years to get to the UK average. Some reward for people with a degree, professional training and a post-graduate qualification providing an invaluable service to the state.
According to some surveys the average graduate starting salary is between £19k-£22k.

You also say it takes a teacher three years to make the UK average as though that’s a bad thing; in three years they’ll be earning the average despite being far less experienced than the average person. If you want to go into teaching you know what the salaries are like, if you don’t feel it’s enough then pick a different career
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TCA2b
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#58
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Ever since Thatcher's time.
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Kenneth56
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#59
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(Original post by DeBruyne18)
The BBC have been very pro-tory economically and presented them as economically competent whereas they consistently describe Labour as reckless.
I agree to some extent that the BBC gave the current Labour Party a hard time (perhaps less so recently).

However, the current government is running a socialist government which the BBC appears to approve of (taking nearly half of our money away in tax for example).

All those "why is the government not spending more money on it" questions have had an effect and have effectively closed down Conservative politics.
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Ambitious1999
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#60
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(Original post by Kenneth56)
I agree to some extent that the BBC gave the current Labour Party a hard time (perhaps less so recently).

However, the current government is running a socialist government which the BBC appears to approve of (taking nearly half of our money away in tax for example).

All those "why is the government not spending more money on it" questions have had an effect and have effectively closed down Conservative politics.
The current government is very right wing. Only last month May appointed Esther McVey as head of welfare to give those on welfare such as the disabled a miserable time, with more cuts and harsher sanctions for the unemployed.
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