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Which universities have traditional medical courses except oxbridge? Watch

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    I looked online but I can;t really find a list.I only know oxbridge offer a traditional course, what other universities offer it.I know St Andrews does but it doesn't offer the full medical course and only pre clinical years and you have to transfer to a different uni for the clinical bit, which completely puts me off.Does imperial and UCL offer a traditional course or integrated course?
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    UCL
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    Both are traditional courses, if I'm not wrong so is Birmingham (check, it might be integrated now)
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    Does anyone know if Edinburgh is traditional,integrated or pbl.Im getting mixed results online?
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    Does anyone know if Edinburgh is traditional,integrated or pbl.Im getting mixed results online?
    99% sure traditional
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    Does anyone know if Edinburgh is traditional,integrated or pbl.Im getting mixed results online?
    Doonesbury nexttime artful_lounger
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    Medicine isn't my area - ^nexttime is the one
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    Queen’s Belfast is also traditional isn’t it?
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    (Original post by penne pasta)
    Queen’s Belfast is also traditional isn’t it?
    I think so,but I don't really want to go all the way to Ireland to study medicine,even though it's a good university and stuff if you know what I mean?
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    I think so,but I don't really want to go all the way to Ireland to study medicine,even though it's a good university and stuff if you know what I mean?
    It's still in the UK...

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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    It's still in the UK...

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    I know, it's just I can't see myself living in Northern Ireland, Im sure some people love it but it's not for me.It's also too far away for me.
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    From Edinburgh's medicine page:

    "How will I learn?
    You will be taught through a combination of lectures, tutorials, problem-based learning, laboratory and project work, clinical placements and computer-assisted learning. The Student-Selected Components (SSCs) offer flexibility and choice throughout the curriculum. "

    and from Wikipedia:

    "First-year students undertake the study of Biomedical Science and Health, Ethics and Society, which provide an introduction to the scientific, sociological and behavioural principles for the practice of medicine. Clinical communication and resuscitation skills are also taught. Students get early patient communication exposure through placements at GP practices, and have the opportunity to investigate a chosen healthcare issue in a clinical setting during Student Selected Component 1.

    In Year 2, students continue study of the body systems in Biomedical Science and pick further Student Selected Components. In Epidemiology and Statistics, critical appraisal of medical papers is applied to refine knowledge. In Introduction to Clinical Practice, students undertake basic history-taking and examination in weekly general practice placements."
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    From Edinburgh's medicine page:

    "How will I learn?
    You will be taught through a combination of lectures, tutorials, problem-based learning, laboratory and project work, clinical placements and computer-assisted learning. The Student-Selected Components (SSCs) offer flexibility and choice throughout the curriculum. "

    and from Wikipedia:

    "First-year students undertake the study of Biomedical Science and Health, Ethics and Society, which provide an introduction to the scientific, sociological and behavioural principles for the practice of medicine. Clinical communication and resuscitation skills are also taught. Students get early patient communication exposure through placements at GP practices, and have the opportunity to investigate a chosen healthcare issue in a clinical setting during Student Selected Component 1.

    In Year 2, students continue study of the body systems in Biomedical Science and pick further Student Selected Components. In Epidemiology and Statistics, critical appraisal of medical papers is applied to refine knowledge. In Introduction to Clinical Practice, students undertake basic history-taking and examination in weekly general practice placements."
    You will be taught through a combination of lectures, tutorials, problem-based learning, laboratory and project work, clinical placements and computer-assisted learning. The Student-Selected Components (SSCs) offer flexibility and choice throughout the curriculum. "

    The words I put in bold- does that mean it's pbl would you say because I also so something that said something about it being integrated:

    Following the recommendations outlined by the General Medical Council, Edinburgh medical school introduced an integrated curriculum in 1998, and this was further developed and updated in 2004. This curriculum underpins the medical school’s goal to prepare a medical graduate to become clinically competent in a research-rich environment.

    So I'm a bit confused if it's pbl or integrated?
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    You will be taught through a combination of lectures, tutorials, problem-based learning, laboratory and project work, clinical placements and computer-assisted learning. The Student-Selected Components (SSCs) offer flexibility and choice throughout the curriculum. "

    The words I put in bold- does that mean it's pbl would you say because I also so something that said something about it being integrated:

    Following the recommendations outlined by the General Medical Council, Edinburgh medical school introduced an integrated curriculum in 1998, and this was further developed and updated in 2004. This curriculum underpins the medical school’s goal to prepare a medical graduate to become clinically competent in a research-rich environment.

    So I'm a bit confused if it's pbl or integrated?
    from the BMA:

    "Integrated courses which the majority of medical schools have now implemented, integrate what was previously learnt at the pre-clinical and clinical stages, to provide a seamless course. Teaching methods can include problem-based learning (PBL) and practical clinical skills."
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    from the BMA:

    "Integrated courses which the majority of medical schools have now implemented, integrate what was previously learnt at the pre-clinical and clinical stages, to provide a seamless course. Teaching methods can include problem-based learning (PBL) and practical clinical skills."
    So would you say the teaching style at Edinburgh is more like pbl then traditional including lots of clinical stuff.Im not sure if I'm phrasing this right.I know a traditional course has little clinical stuff.but what I'm saying the teaching style, if we put it on a spectrum thingy it would lean towards pbl rather then traditional?
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    So would you say the teaching style at Edinburgh is more like pbl then traditional including lots of clinical stuff.Im not sure if I'm phrasing this right.I know a traditional course has little clinical stuff.but what I'm saying the teaching style, if we put it on a spectrum thingy it would lean towards pbl rather then traditional?
    I have no idea, all I did was google "Edinburgh medical degree" and managed to find all that. I'm sure there is more information elsewhere...

    PBL is a subcategory of integrated medical teaching. Just because a course has some PBL elements doesn't mean the entire course is PBL based - I think there are very few which are now, based on the BMA page I referred to.

    I'm fairly certain the supervision/tutorial format of Oxbridge would approximate PBL sessions, just with smaller groups, from other universities anyway. There isn't going to be any medical degree which lets you sit in a lecture hall for three years before turning you out on the wards.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    I have no idea, all I did was google "Edinburgh medical degree" and managed to find all that. I'm sure there is more information elsewhere...

    PBL is a subcategory of integrated medical teaching. Just because a course has some PBL elements doesn't mean the entire course is PBL based - I think there are very few which are now, based on the BMA page I referred to.

    I'm fairly certain the supervision/tutorial format of Oxbridge would approximate PBL sessions, just with smaller groups, from other universities anyway. There isn't going to be any medical degree which lets you sit in a lecture hall for three years before turning you out on the wards.
    Yes but overall oxbridge is a traditional course. I really don't like the pbl course.Im looking for medical schools that are mostly traditional and have little pbl.
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    Imperial and UCL have traditional medical courses
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    (Original post by lalaland808)
    Imperial and UCL
    Do you know of any other ones?
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    Do you know of any other ones?
    Kings is integrated but with little PBL. I myself really like PBL and have applied to mainly PBL courses
 
 
 
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