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    ..... I’m interested in a law degree but I don’t exactly know what it entails. What are considered some of the better unis for law so that I can look at the modules and that. What does a typical law exam question look like?
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    You don't need to bump a 20 minute old thread

    Currently all qualifying law degrees (QLDs) are required to cover core content of the following subjects:

    Public law (constitutional/administrative)
    European Union law
    Procedural law (including law of evidence)
    Criminal law
    Law of obligations (contract, restitution, and tort)
    Property law (real property)
    Trusts and equity

    Beyond those typically it's options in more specialised areas of law (such as corporate law, taxation, intellectual property law, family law, etc, etc), sometimes allied subjects like jurisprudence (the philosophy of law) and usually some core legal writing/research skills and optionally a thesis/dissertation/extended essay on a legal topic.

    Here is an overview of some specific topics covered in contract and public law by a student on here:

    (Original post by RevisingHard)
    Contract -
    Offer/ acceptance
    consideration
    damages
    third party
    discharge
    duress
    estoppel
    inteention/certaint
    - Off he top of my head - sure there is more

    Public -
    HRA/ ECHR / Delegated leg primary leg/ UK constitution/ EU law etc etc

    Thanks so much x
    Here are two questions from a Contract Law Exam at King's Inns (an Irish law school - so there are likely some jurisdictional differences in how you would respond, not that it necessarily invalidates the question)

    Spoiler:
    Show


    3. In January 2008 Imogen owned a run-down block of flats next to a shopping centre belonging to James. As residential property, the flats were worth €5m. Imogen knew that James was keen to expand his business, and offered to sell him the flats for €7m. James agreed in writing, subject to planning permission to permit him to demolish the flats and extend his shopping centre. However, by April it had become clear the sewerage system for the flats was in a state of considerable disrepair, and (after an escape of sewage) it emerges that the cost of repairs will make James’ expansion scheme commercially unfeasible. James abandons his attempt to obtain planning permission, even though the chances of success seemed high. Imogen had appreciated throughout that she could have done more to keep the drains in good repair, and guessed that the planned work would be much more expensive than James thought. She had not mentioned this to James, though she had given honest answers to all questions he had asked about the state of the premises. Due to a general fall in property values, the flats are now worth only €4m as residential property. Advise Imogen.

    4. In relation to any TWO of the following issues, comment on whether the current law is in need of reform, illustrating your answer with relevant case law: a) How serious a breach is required to terminate a contract; b) When can those not party to a contract rely on its terms; and c) In what circumstances a bargain will be considered unconscionable.

    and below is some commentary by a student on TSR on how to answer questions in such an exam, if you click the quote to go to the original post:

    This isn't particularly hard to find, and not particularly useful or relevant anyway. None of it will make much sense until you actually study the course, and they will not expect anyone to have any idea what they're necessarily getting into, and will work with students to develop their writing skills to appropriately reflect legal writing styles and methods. Basically though you'll study an aspect of the law, and then a variety of cases where it was applied or called into question. You'll probably then be given exercises (such as essays or exam questions) where a hypothetical scenario is posed, and you need to use your knowledge of these different cases which may partially or not apply to the question at hand, and formulate a response based on that. It's unlikely a question would mirror an actual case identically because then if you'd read that case you would immediately know the resolution - the expectation is that you understand how the resolutions of those cases were reasoned to and then use similar reasoning to come to appropriate conclusions for others.
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    (Original post by Reece.W.J)
    ..... I’m interested in a law degree but I don’t exactly know what it entails. What are considered some of the better unis for law so that I can look at the modules and that. What does a typical law exam question look like?
    All the unis offer pretty much the same modules, so you don't need to know what the "better unis" are before doing your research.

    A law exam will include a combination of problem questions (scenarios which you need to give advice to your fictional client about) essays (usually a proposition which you analyse/critically discuss). In some exams, you will have to do one of each; one essay or one PQ; or you can choose any combination you like. As mentioned, there is no point really giving you a particular past paper because you won't have a clue what any of it means nor how demanding it is in terms of the content it is asking you to address.

    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Currently all qualifying law degrees (QLDs) are required to cover core content of the following subjects:

    Public law (constitutional/administrative)
    European Union law
    Procedural law (including law of evidence)
    Criminal law
    Law of obligations (contract, restitution, and tort)
    Property law (real property)
    Trusts and equity

    Beyond those typically it's options in more specialised areas of law (such as corporate law, taxation, intellectual property law, family law, etc, etc), sometimes allied subjects like jurisprudence (the philosophy of law) and usually some core legal writing/research skills and optionally a thesis/dissertation/extended essay on a legal topic.
    I understand you got that list from the Essex Uni's website. I am not really sure why they say you need to do procedural law, such as the law of evidence. It is not listed by the SRA as a compulsory module and most courses offer the law of evidence as an optional module. I for one have never done the law of evidence. Plus on the website, Essex are using a dead link to a Wikipedia article as their source.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    All the unis offer pretty much the same modules, so you don't need to know what the "better unis" are before doing your research.

    A law exam will include a combination of problem questions (scenarios which you need to give advice to your fictional client about) essays (usually a proposition which you analyse/critically discuss). In some exams, you will have to do one of each; one essay or one PQ; or you can choose any combination you like. As mentioned, there is no point really giving you a particular past paper because you won't have a clue what any of it means nor how demanding it is in terms of the content it is asking you to address.



    I understand you got that list from the Essex Uni's website. I am not really sure why they say you need to do procedural law, such as the law of evidence. It is not listed by the SRA as a compulsory module and most courses offer the law of evidence as an optional module. I for one have never done the law of evidence. Plus on the website, Essex are using a dead link to a Wikipedia article as their source.
    Fair point. I believe it's required for Scots law, although that's probably not relevant for OP. I didn't actually notice that addition, although the others are typical of what I've see of other universities, and to my knowledge what are required by the SRA for the current qualification format including e.g. Oxbridge (incidentally OP Oxford requires all students take Jurisprudence as a paper).
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Fair point. I believe it's required for Scots law, although that's probably not relevant for OP. I didn't actually notice that addition, although the others are typical of what I've see of other universities, and to my knowledge what are required by the SRA for the current qualification format including e.g. Oxbridge (incidentally OP Oxford requires all students take Jurisprudence as a paper).
    By time I get there (yr 12 atm) do you think EU law will still be required. Well they plan on copying it over to start with or depends on the deal
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Fair point. I believe it's required for Scots law, although that's probably not relevant for OP. I didn't actually notice that addition, although the others are typical of what I've see of other universities, and to my knowledge what are required by the SRA for the current qualification format including e.g. Oxbridge (incidentally OP Oxford requires all students take Jurisprudence as a paper).
    Yes, the others are required subjects for a QLD.
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    I think the questions seem interesting and I will certainly consider applying to law next year. Ik all the London colleges are great but do any of Birmingham, Bristol or Swansea offer good law because they’re slightly closer to home and cheaper living costs
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