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    I've been wanting to do Maths, Physics and Computer Science at A level for some time now, but I've really started to enjoy maths (especially Additional Maths) and I'm finding that I'm able to do it much better than I used to be able to. I've also started to get more and more bored in GCSE Computer Science, partly due to not so great teaching and partly because it isn't anywhere near challenging for me. Because of this and because I don't want 2 years with the Computer Science teachers at my school on an easy curriculum, I'm really considering taking Further Maths instead of Computer Science. However, I'm not sure if I would be able to get a good grade (A or A*) in it, hence why I'm making this thread.

    To give you some context, I want to do Computer Science at Cambridge as my "dream uni", but if I can't get A*A*A then I would want to go to Manchester to do Computer Science.

    I used to hate maths (and school for that matter) until around three quarters through Year 10, when I looked at the entry requirements for quite a few good unis and saw that you needed A level maths. I was in set 3 maths at the time getting about 14/80 on school exams (about grade 3/4), so once I saw that you need A level maths I knew I needed to step up my game. From there, I started working on maths in my own time and started working in class (which seemed to have had a ripple effect on my other subjects, since now I'm working much harder in my other classes).

    My teacher was pleased with me and I kept trying until my end of year mocks, where I didn't revise enough at home by any means but I tried hard in my exams (guessing on many of the questions since I hadn't listened when we were taught a lot of it) and got 138/240 on three 80 mark higher papers. I apparently beat the vast majority of set 2 and got a high 6 (if we went by the new grade boundaries for 9-1 in 2017, that would be about halfway through a 7).

    I got moved up to set 2 when I came back in Year 11 and now I'm completely focused in class. The main difference that I've noticed between the start of Year 10 and now is that I used to look at a question and go "I don't know" and lose focus immediately, now I actually think about and take interest in solving the problem and using what I've learnt already. Maths is now my favourite lesson by quite a mile, and I'm really enjoying doing maths. I'm currently going through all of the content at home that I haven't learned, either because I was in set 3 or because I didn't listen.

    I've also started doing Additional Maths with the set 1's class after school, and so far I've found it pretty easy (done calculus and division of polynomials so far). Additional Maths is far more enjoyable than GCSE Maths for me, and considering I already enjoy GCSE maths, that's a big thing. My winter mocks will show how far I've come since the summer, but based on what I'm doing already, do you think an A or A* in Further Maths is within my scope by the end of Year 13 if I progress how I am now (whilst obviously working much, much harder)?

    tl;dr, I have progressed from hating maths and getting a grade 3/4 to really enjoying maths and getting a high 6 from about 3/4 through Year 10 to the end of Year 10 and am now taking Additional Maths and am finding it easy but still quite challenging, do you think I could get an A or A* in Further Maths by the end of Year 13 if I work hard for it?

    (apologies for the length of this post, I just wanted to give as much context as possible)
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    (Original post by Astravolt)
    I've been wanting to do Maths, Physics and Computer Science at A level for some time now, but I've really started to enjoy maths (especially Additional Maths) and I'm finding that I'm able to do it much better than I used to be able to. I've also started to get more and more bored in GCSE Computer Science, partly due to not so great teaching and partly because it isn't anywhere near challenging for me. Because of this and because I don't want 2 years with the Computer Science teachers at my school on an easy curriculum, I'm really considering taking Further Maths instead of Computer Science. However, I'm not sure if I would be able to get a good grade (A or A*) in it, hence why I'm making this thread.

    To give you some context, I want to do Computer Science at Cambridge as my "dream uni", but if I can't get A*A*A then I would want to go to Manchester to do Computer Science.

    I used to hate maths (and school for that matter) until around three quarters through Year 10, when I looked at the entry requirements for quite a few good unis and saw that you needed A level maths. I was in set 3 maths at the time getting about 14/80 on school exams (about grade 3/4), so once I saw that you need A level maths I knew I needed to step up my game. From there, I started working on maths in my own time and started working in class (which seemed to have had a ripple effect on my other subjects, since now I'm working much harder in my other classes).

    My teacher was pleased with me and I kept trying until my end of year mocks, where I didn't revise enough at home by any means but I tried hard in my exams (guessing on many of the questions since I hadn't listened when we were taught a lot of it) and got 138/240 on three 80 mark higher papers. I apparently beat the vast majority of set 2 and got a high 6 (if we went by the new grade boundaries for 9-1 in 2017, that would be about halfway through a 7).

    I got moved up to set 2 when I came back in Year 11 and now I'm completely focused in class. The main difference that I've noticed between the start of Year 10 and now is that I used to look at a question and go "I don't know" and lose focus immediately, now I actually think about and take interest in solving the problem and using what I've learnt already. Maths is now my favourite lesson by quite a mile, and I'm really enjoying doing maths. I'm currently going through all of the content at home that I haven't learned, either because I was in set 3 or because I didn't listen.

    I've also started doing Additional Maths with the set 1's class after school, and so far I've found it pretty easy (done calculus and division of polynomials so far). Additional Maths is far more enjoyable than GCSE Maths for me, and considering I already enjoy GCSE maths, that's a big thing. My winter mocks will show how far I've come since the summer, but based on what I'm doing already, do you think an A or A* in Further Maths is within my scope by the end of Year 13 if I progress how I am now (whilst obviously working much, much harder)?

    tl;dr, I have progressed from hating maths and getting a grade 3/4 to really enjoying maths and getting a high 6 from about 3/4 through Year 10 to the end of Year 10 and am now taking Additional Maths and am finding it easy but still quite challenging, do you think I could get an A or A* in Further Maths by the end of Year 13 if I work hard for it?

    (apologies for the length of this post, I just wanted to give as much context as possible)
    I've no idea whether you would be able to get an A or A* in further maths as I don't know you - only you and your school know what you're capable of.

    What I would say is that computer science is not a particularly respected respected A-level; it's one of the ones, like law, that is a great subject at degree level but seen as a bit of a pointless easy ride at A-level.

    Also, while Cambridge doesn't say you *have* to have further maths, I would be willing to bet that the vast majority of successful applicants do.

    The problem with A-levels in maths, physics and computer science, is that you don't really have enough maths to study physics, engineering or computer science at a top university.

    Personally, I'd ask your teachers if they think your capable of further maths, and if so, take that.

    You could always start the year doing 4 - Maths, FM, Physics & CS - and then drop FM if it's too hard or CS if it's not.
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    (Original post by LeapingLucy)
    I've no idea whether you would be able to get an A or A* in further maths as I don't know you - only you and your school know what you're capable of.

    What I would say is that computer science is not a particularly respected respected A-level; it's one of the ones, like law, that is a great subject at degree level but seen as a bit of a pointless easy ride at A-level.

    Also, while Cambridge doesn't say you *have* to have further maths, I would be willing to bet that the vast majority of successful applicants do.

    The problem with A-levels in maths, physics and computer science, is that you don't really have enough maths to study physics, engineering or computer science at a top university.

    Personally, I'd ask your teachers if they think your capable of further maths, and if so, take that.

    You could always start the year doing 4 - Maths, FM, Physics & CS - and then drop FM if it's too hard or CS if it's not.
    Thanks for your answer! I would like to do 4 and then drop one, but the school explicitly said that they weren't going to let anyone do that (we aren't doing AS).
 
 
 
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