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    I'm having difficulty deciding between theoretical engineering courses or practical courses. It's between Mechanical, electrical, automotive and motorsports engineering.

    At first my plan was to finish my mechanical engineering degree then get a postgraduate degree in both electronic and motorsports since my university only has mechanical. But since I am applying to transfer and I have all the options open for me now I am wondering whether I should continue the same way or if I should take advantage early on.

    I was told mechanical would be really useful theoretically especially to get into Formula 1 for example with some independant practical experience, but i read in another forum that motorsports offers so much more hands on.

    And if i am staying theoretical would it be more useful to study electronics as it is the future of cars or would that set me back mechanically. And is automotive a wiser choice because its a combination of both mechanical and motorsports but to a lesser more general extent?

    Please tell me everything you can about your majors :P Cheers.
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    (Original post by kellyhelou)
    I'm having difficulty deciding between theoretical engineering courses or practical courses. It's between Mechanical, electrical, automotive and motorsports engineering.

    At first my plan was to finish my mechanical engineering degree then get a postgraduate degree in both electronic and motorsports since my university only has mechanical. But since I am applying to transfer and I have all the options open for me now I am wondering whether I should continue the same way or if I should take advantage early on.

    I was told mechanical would be really useful theoretically especially to get into Formula 1 for example with some independant practical experience, but i read in another forum that motorsports offers so much more hands on.

    And if i am staying theoretical would it be more useful to study electronics as it is the future of cars or would that set me back mechanically. And is automotive a wiser choice because its a combination of both mechanical and motorsports but to a lesser more general extent?

    Please tell me everything you can about your majors :P Cheers.
    Theoretical engineering is an oxymoron - none of the disciplines you listed are theoretical. I think your concern is more whether you want to study a broad discipline applicable to many different sectors or one aimed at more specific sectors. You can get into the automotive and motorsports industries with a mechanical degree (and you can also get into other industries with an automotive/motorsports degree too), it's just that an automotive/motorsports degree will be more geared towards those sectors, and the universities offering the courses will (hopefully!) have industrial links that you can exploit to help you secure a relevant position upon graduation.

    Regarding mechanical vs electronics, if you're more mechanically minded, study mechanical (or related); and if you're more electronically minded, study electrical and electronics.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    Theoretical engineering is an oxymoron - none of the disciplines you listed are theoretical. I think your concern is more whether you want to study a broad discipline applicable to many different sectors or one aimed at more specific sectors. You can get into the automotive and motorsports industries with a mechanical degree (and you can also get into other industries with an automotive/motorsports degree too), it's just that an automotive/motorsports degree will be more geared towards those sectors, and the universities offering the courses will (hopefully!) have industrial links that you can exploit to help you secure a relevant position upon graduation.

    Regarding mechanical vs electronics, if you're more mechanically minded, study mechanical (or related); and if you're more electronically minded, study electrical and electronics.
    Okk I see what u mean, by theoretical I meant that in my university they only teach the course through lessons and very little lab work, nothing really worth mentioning. But that was quite helpful though. I'm still however having trouble between automotive and motor sports. I'd assume automotive would be more geared towards mass production and so I'd assume it wouldn't be as technologically advanced as motor sports, whereas the latter would mainly focus on racing and completely overlook the on road production process. Is that the case?
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    (Original post by kellyhelou)
    Okk I see what u mean, by theoretical I meant that in my university they only teach the course through lessons and very little lab work, nothing really worth mentioning. But that was quite helpful though. I'm still however having trouble between automotive and motor sports. I'd assume automotive would be more geared towards mass production and so I'd assume it wouldn't be as technologically advanced as motor sports, whereas the latter would mainly focus on racing and completely overlook the on road production process. Is that the case?
    I wouldn't necessarily despair about a lack of lab work - in my experience, the actual lab work, as in performing and watching experiments, primarily to verify taught lecture material, wasn't particularly useful, generally. I would place more emphasis on being involved in 'real' engineering projects (preferably in groups) with real constraints and open-ended solutions. I think all universities have at least one group design project as part of the course (I am sure that that is a requirement for achieved accreditation), but I think more would be useful. Of course, these don't have to be formal parts of the degree, extra curricular activities such as Formula Student are excellent too - particularly if you are interested in motor sport!

    I'm not in the automotive industry but I'd say it's a reasonable assumption that automotive would be wider than motorsports, which would likely focus on racing and the technology behind that. Best confirm by checking the course content, though, as as I said it's not my field.
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    I see, my university does indeed have a final year design project. I was also thinking of trying to compete in formula student this year aswell. Anyway thank you for your help, you managed to help me clarify some thoughts i appreciate it. I'll be looking more into detail about the course contents.
 
 
 
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