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    I applied to University last Friday and I wanted to do Maths and Econ in the past but thought against it because it was far too competitive. I applied to Nottingham for economics and for me it’s my fourth choice University, I had a look at the maths and econ course modules there and I really liked some of the modules covered.

    I am now considering changing to maths and econ for Nottingham as an alternative degree, my personal statement did show my interest in maths along with econ so I feel like it might be a natural change. The entry requirements are similar to pure economics but I don’t know if it’s worth the risk as my other University options are very competitive and I picked Nottingham as a safer option.
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    (Original post by jschohan)
    I applied to University last Friday and I wanted to do Maths and Econ in the past but thought against it because it was far too competitive. I applied to Nottingham for economics and for me it’s my fourth choice University, I had a look at the maths and econ course modules there and I really liked some of the modules covered.

    I am now considering changing to maths and econ for Nottingham as an alternative degree, my personal statement did show my interest in maths along with econ so I feel like it might be a natural change. The entry requirements are similar to pure economics but I don’t know if it’s worth the risk as my other University options are very competitive and I picked Nottingham as a safer option.
    My predicted grades are 3A*A, is it worth changing since it was my preferred degree all along?
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    I can’t directly answer your question, but can suggest things to consider. I) the BSc econ at Notts is quite mathematical to start with, and much more than A level economics - are you sure this isnt enough maths? 2) if you love pure maths you can consider the joint 3) the Which Uni website will say how competitive it is in terms of offers made 4) if you do a joint you will restrict your optional module choices in economics, so check them out for the single and joint courses before deciding. Hope this helps. Best wishes.
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    (Original post by Mancmike300)
    I can’t directly answer your question, but can suggest things to consider. I) the BSc econ at Notts is quite mathematical to start with, and much more than A level economics - are you sure this isnt enough maths? 2) if you love pure maths you can consider the joint 3) the Which Uni website will say how competitive it is in terms of offers made 4) if you do a joint you will restrict your optional module choices in economics, so check them out for the single and joint courses before deciding. Hope this helps. Best wishes.
    Thanks for the reply, I was mainly considering maths and econ at Nottingham because they offered some computer sciencey modules like cryptography and I’ve subsequently also found out that Warwick do some programming modules externally in econ which is quite nice. I love econ but I feel like I want some variety over the course and I am quite interested in programming or something similar as a module in an econ degree hence my initial liking of a maths and econ degree.

    The applications per place is a big turn off however, 6 for the econ degree and 10 for the maths and econ so it does have a big question mark.

    I’ve only got a few days to decide now haha 😃
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    You sound like someone who is interested in many things. You will obviously make the best choice you can. All the courses you have mentioned are highly regarded, and I suspect you will find interesting opportunities whichever route you choose to take.
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    That’s very encouraging, thanks man, I’ll probably just take econ and see where it goes. I guess there’s always societies to try new things out
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    (Original post by jschohan)
    Thanks for the reply, I was mainly considering maths and econ at Nottingham because they offered some computer sciencey modules like cryptography and I’ve subsequently also found out that Warwick do some programming modules externally in econ which is quite nice. I love econ but I feel like I want some variety over the course and I am quite interested in programming or something similar as a module in an econ degree hence my initial liking of a maths and econ degree.

    The applications per place is a big turn off however, 6 for the econ degree and 10 for the maths and econ so it does have a big question mark.

    I’ve only got a few days to decide now haha 😃
    You don't need to do a module in CS to learn to program. You'll probably learn some basic scripting skills in a relevant language/programme in the course of the degree anyway, and you can easily learn basic coding skills on your own.

    Cryptography has nothing to do with programming and is largely irrelevant to Economics. Cryptography was a major area before computing existed, incidentally - it simply became easier to resolve many of the older problems computationally, and computers allowed the possibility of more complex encryption. It's fundamentally based on Number Theory, which Computer Science also has links to (hence why it's easier for computers to solve a lot of the problems, due to how computer arithmetic and mathematics works).

    Also you can learn aspects of cryptography outside of a formal course, and there are a fair number of resources as amateur cryptography is quite popular (although this tends to be more Dan Brown stuff than computing stuff, although no doubt you can find resources for either/both). While each has their own interests, I'd note that cryptography specifically (and to an extent, NT generally) was one of the most tedious and boring things I studied in Maths, so...pinch of salt
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    You don't need to do a module in CS to learn to program. You'll probably learn some basic scripting skills in a relevant language/programme in the course of the degree anyway, and you can easily learn basic coding skills on your own.

    Cryptography has nothing to do with programming and is largely irrelevant to Economics. Cryptography was a major area before computing existed, incidentally - it simply became easier to resolve many of the older problems computationally, and computers allowed the possibility of more complex encryption. It's fundamentally based on Number Theory, which Computer Science also has links to (hence why it's easier for computers to solve a lot of the problems, due to how computer arithmetic and mathematics works).

    Also you can learn aspects of cryptography outside of a formal course, and there are a fair number of resources as amateur cryptography is quite popular (although this tends to be more Dan Brown stuff than computing stuff, although no doubt you can find resources for either/both). While each has their own interests, I'd note that cryptography specifically (and to an extent, NT generally) was one of the most tedious and boring things I studied in Maths, so...pinch of salt
    That’s a shame, I thought cryptography was more code and puzzle making/solving which seemed quite cool, but that’s not a good thing to hear 😆

    Any suggestions on any programming languages to learn or any websites to have a look at??? I’ve heard java and c++ tend to be the most useful and applicable to the wider world
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    (Original post by jschohan)
    That’s a shame, I thought cryptography was more code and puzzle making/solving which seemed quite cool, but that’s not a good thing to hear 😆

    Any suggestions on any programming languages to learn or any websites to have a look at??? I’ve heard java and c++ tend to be the most useful and applicable to the wider world
    Python is probably the nicest and most generally useful. The adage being "for every specific application of programming, you have one specialist language as the most used, and then Python as the second most" - which tells you a lot about the usefulness of Python. It's also "nice" to use, unlike some others (I hear Java is pretty crap honestly).

    For Economics the most relevant would probably be R since they do more statistical programming in the subject. However Python would be reasonable to get a good idea of general purpose programming. If you really want to learn how the computers work while implementing the code you put in, C is good as you necessarily are required to explicitly consider memory management etc, that most modern languages abstract away.

    C is pretty much not useful unless you're writing from scratch code/software for some vast computational project you're running, in terms of Economics. Python will do anything it does more easily and more nicely, howevre theoretcailly C can be more efficient due to the greater control you have over how the language does stuff. But it will force you to think very carefully and critically about what you're doing with your code, which is a good thing. However it's also not very "fun" to use, generally.

    Java and C++ are fine, but arguably Python does what they do, more nicely, and C does what they do, better. However I don't have any personal experience with those languages, so this is based on anecdotal accounts from others who do (and they use them for different purposes than you're intending as well).

    Oh and MATLAB is always useful for numerate subjects, although it's more glorified scripting than anything. However you will have to hope your uni has some licenses that allow student downloads or else you're stuck doing it on uni computers or paying...a lot of money, to get it.
 
 
 
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