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    (Original post by AspiringUnderdog)
    wow I just realised that I got this wrong because when rationalising I made 8 x1/sqrt2 8sqrt2 when it should be 4sqrt2. Thanks though!
    for 85:

    perpendicular lines so product of gradients = -1 ----> m=-1/p (1)

    distance between intersection of lines with x axis = 5 ----> -2/p + 3/m =5 (2)

    Solving simultaneously by subbing (1) in (2) gives a quadratic in p:

    3p^2 +5p +2 = 0 solving this gives p= -1 or p= -2/3

    But m cannot be 1 so p cannot be -1 as m= -1/p

    Therefore p = -2/3 and m= 3/2 and m+p = 5/6
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    Btw AspiringUnderdog I have applied for Engineering at Cambridge so I will sit the ENGAA on 2nd Nov which has the same maths and physics section as NSAA for the first section I think haha but second section is different for ENGAA and NSAA
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    (Original post by AspiringUnderdog)
    Also could you try 85 please.
    I'll try help you understand anything you still don't get tomorrow
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    (Original post by Anonymouspsych)
    85 I got D

    I got 88 to be D but I don't even get the question how can two horizontal forces be right angles to each other??? surely they are parallel
    I think that when it says horizontal here it means that they are acting in the horizontal plane so go across the surface instead of perpendicular to the plane itself.

    Since the forces act perpendicular, the resultant of them OS the hypotenuse of the right angled triangle so we get sqrt(9^2+12^2)=15N.
    Friction=coeff(of friction)*mg=0.25*2*10=5N.
    Resultant of these two forces is 15N-5N=10N since they act in a straight line in opposing directions.
    F=ma
    a=10/2=5.
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    (Original post by Anonymouspsych)
    for 85:

    perpendicular lines so product of gradients = -1 ----> m=-1/p (1)

    distance between intersection of lines with x axis = 5 ----> -2/p + 3/m =5 (2)

    Solving simultaneously by subbing (1) in (2) gives a quadratic in p:

    3p^2 +5p +2 = 0 solving this gives p= -1 or p= -2/3

    But m cannot be 1 so p cannot be -1 as m= -1/p

    Therefore p = -2/3 and m= 3/2 and m+p = 5/6
    (Original post by Anonymouspsych)
    Btw AspiringUnderdog I have applied for Engineering at Cambridge so I will sit the ENGAA on 2nd Nov which has the same maths and physics section as NSAA for the first section I think haha but second section is different for ENGAA and NSAA
    Ah right that makes sense. I made some stupid mistakes. made m =-p instead of -1/p. I tried making both equations equal to each other but it got a different answer why do you think that that is?

    Also, good luck for that. We'll probably get similar questions for Section 1 but not section 2. Probably is still worth trying NSAA questions from section 2 for practise and vice versa for me.
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    (Original post by ImprobableCacti)
    I'll try help you understand anything you still don't get tomorrow
    For now it looks like I'm in good hands but if I find some more questions I'll hit you up.
    Thanks!
 
 
 
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