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    Are these degrees valued much? Is it good to say you have a degree in French and then apply for an ordinary job where the language isn't exactly needed? I am little unsure about these degrees but I am interested.
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    (Original post by Dragon5555)
    Are these degrees valued much? Is it good to say you have a degree in French and then apply for an ordinary job where the language isn't exactly needed? I am little unsure about these degrees but I am interested.
    Yes! Modern Languages degrees not only get you fluent in the language(s) you're taking, but you also learn transferrable skills which would aid you in pretty much all job sectors. In my opinion they are much more valued than a degree in say, History or something
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    (Original post by Rex Onocrotalus)
    Yes! Modern Languages degrees not only get you fluent in the language(s) you're taking, but you also learn transferrable skills which would aid you in pretty much all job sectors. In my opinion they are much more valued than a degree in say, History or something
    Woah. So what modern language would be the best to study? I guess it does depend on what you want to do in the future though.
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    A language degree is as useful as any other "generalist" degree in e.g. the Social Sciences or Humanities for applying to generalist roles in your mother tongue (presumably English). They're obviously much better for applying to roles where you need to speak the target language(s) as they demonstrate your proficiency by themselves, rather than requiring awkward certification from other sources.

    So you get all the benefits of said generalist degree, with the added flexibility of being able to work (or study further) in a country that speaks the target language(s). There are also some specialist options in e.g. translation as a possibility, although strictly speaking a degree isn't a requirement for this, and is more of a vehicle to achieve near native proficiency in the target translation language(s).
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    (Original post by Dragon5555)
    Woah. So what modern language would be the best to study? I guess it does depend on what you want to do in the future though.
    That's a completely subjective question. If you want to keep your options open, choose a language with a high number of speakers, but if you want to stay European, don't go for Arabic or Chinese etc. If you want to try a new language but stay European do Portuguese or Italian perhaps, but ultimately you need to find which culture(s)/language(s) interest you the most. For me, that was Spanish and Arabic, but if it's French, German, Persian, Japanese, Italian, Russian or Hebrew, choose that instead. You wouldn't be at a huge disadvantage doing any language to be honest

    EDIT - check out this booklet made by the British Council - they highlight the 10 most important languages for the future of Britain.

    https://www.britishcouncil.org/sites...ure-report.pdf
 
 
 
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