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    I've just found out that the average TSA score needed to be at least considered for an interview is consistently much higher at my chosen college than it is at others. My TSA score, albeit rather good, is still below the suprisignly high average. Other colleges appear to be less demanding and so I was wondering whether I should alter my application? It is still possible to do that by directly contacting the university.
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    Where have you found this out? And which college?
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    (Original post by NamesAreEffort)
    Where have you found this out? And which college?
    The most recent one is this

    https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/reque..._passthrough=1

    Just look at the average score needed for an offer to be made by Hertford or Pembroke. And then compare that to LMH

    The difference is almost 10%
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    Yeah so the data is not showing different thresholds needed to get an interview/offer at all.

    It's totally random, and almost certainly the data changes year on year. Colleges which receive way more offers like Balliol and Brasenose, because they have a higher applicant to places ratio, if they are taking the top X% first then they'll fairly obviously statistically have people with better results. It's not the case they have higher thresholds. Likewise, it could also be the case that in one year a college just gets slightly weaker TSA results, as I imagine was the case that year for LMH. Therefore if they're taking the top X% they'll on average also have lower TSA scores.

    It's also an important point to mention that in colleges like Balliol and Brasenose, those who are receiving good TSA scores but lower than average due to the sheer number of competition (e.g. Balliol) are the very people the pooling system is designed for. If you're hitting 69 on the TSA, but applied to Brasenose where because of numbers you didn't make the cut, you've got a very high change of being considered for another college, and the colleges which get a lot of pooled candidates will also obviously have lower TSA results, e.g. Regent's Park, Harris Manchester.

    Basically, you can't derive TSA thresholds from this data. It isn't really a case of other colleges being more demanding. If you look at the Keble PPE and Merton PPE data they always have the same thresholds of what is a good score. The numbers also change every year, and almost certainly the average TSA results of offer holders. All this really means for you is if you have applied to a college like Brasenose, you have a higher chance of getting pooled. But that's pretty much a given due to sheer numbers.
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    (Original post by NamesAreEffort)
    Yeah so the data is not showing different thresholds needed to get an interview/offer at all.

    It's totally random, and almost certainly the data changes year on year. Colleges which receive way more offers like Balliol and Brasenose, because they have a higher applicant to places ratio, if they are taking the top X% first then they'll fairly obviously statistically have people with better results. It's not the case they have higher thresholds. Likewise, it could also be the case that in one year a college just gets slightly weaker TSA results, as I imagine was the case that year for LMH. Therefore if they're taking the top X% they'll on average also have lower TSA scores.

    It's also an important point to mention that in colleges like Balliol and Brasenose, those who are receiving good TSA scores but lower than average due to the sheer number of competition (e.g. Balliol) are the very people the pooling system is designed for. If you're hitting 69 on the TSA, but applied to Brasenose where because of numbers you didn't make the cut, you've got a very high change of being considered for another college, and the colleges which get a lot of pooled candidates will also obviously have lower TSA results, e.g. Regent's Park, Harris Manchester.

    Basically, you can't derive TSA thresholds from this data. It isn't really a case of other colleges being more demanding. If you look at the Keble PPE and Merton PPE data they always have the same thresholds of what is a good score. The numbers also change every year, and almost certainly the average TSA results of offer holders. All this really means for you is if you have applied to a college like Brasenose, you have a higher chance of getting pooled. But that's pretty much a given due to sheer numbers.
    I thought the pooling system only works after you have been shortlisted for an interview and the college you applied to was full. But thanks anyway! I understand the system, but always have doubts whenever there's a new piece of data..
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    (Original post by MarilynManson)
    I've just found out that the average TSA score needed to be at least considered for an interview is consistently much higher at my chosen college than it is at others. My TSA score, albeit rather good, is still below the suprisignly high average. Other colleges appear to be less demanding and so I was wondering whether I should alter my application? It is still possible to do that by directly contacting the university.
    I did look at the FOI response you mention, but the figures for one year alone are not convincing and besides, life is too short. Perhaps it would be more helpful to point you at Alan Rusbridger's account, which remains the most detailed "insider" account I know of.

    He explains that once the college admissions tutors have made a first pass of the applications to their college, several colleges meet together to "horse trade" candidates, with the aim of equalising their prospective recruitment pools prior to inviting people to interview. My reading is that it is more flexible than simply "pooling" the "second best" applicants. And after all, it would be ridiculous to imagine that the admissions tutors of LMH - for example - would acquiesce in a system where, year after year, they accepted students who have lower academic credentials than those entering - say - Balliol. Avoiding such a situation is precisely what the Common Framework agreement is designed to achieve.

    Every year, thousands of people try to find ways to "game" the admissions procedures. The bottom line remains - work hard, have a supportive family background, be lucky.
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    (Original post by OxFossil)
    I did look at the FOI response you mention, but the figures for one year alone are not convincing and besides, life is too short. Perhaps it would be more helpful to point you at Alan Rusbridger's account, which remains the most detailed "insider" account I know of.

    He explains that once the college admissions tutors have made a first pass of the applications to their college, several colleges meet together to "horse trade" candidates, with the aim of equalising their prospective recruitment pools prior to inviting people to interview. My reading is that it is more flexible than simply "pooling" the "second best" applicants. And after all, it would be ridiculous to imagine that the admissions tutors of LMH - for example - would acquiesce in a system where, year after year, they accepted students who have lower academic credentials than those entering - say - Balliol. Avoiding such a situation is precisely what the Common Framework agreement is designed to achieve.

    Every year, thousands of people try to find ways to "game" the admissions procedures. The bottom line remains - work hard, have a supportive family background, be lucky.
    If I was on the verge of writing to Oxford to let me into another college, now I am certainly sticking to the choice I made, especially because I do feel.. well, elated by the perspective of studying there. Many thanks for your explanation!
 
 
 
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