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    How did you get A/A* in physics alevel?
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    Hard work baby
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    I just started my A-levels but from the people who I met, all of them had one thing in common. They all had excellent understanding of the principles of physics. If you understand the principles of anything, you will be able to get the top grade. After that, it's just practice and just do loads of past papers.
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    (Original post by H3n)
    Hard work baby
    I need help T_T. I will do whatever it takes T_TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT
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    Basically copied and pasted this from a response to someone else asking a similar q.
    I studied English literature, maths and physics and got A*AA.
    1) I found the best way to revise for science and maths was to compile all relevant information onto sheets of paper, stripping back all the unnecessary stuff, so it’s easy to refer to specifics. (Kind of like your own textbook). I did this by scanning and lifting from multiple textbooks and revision guides and using some colour for more important bits (rules or equations). Once I had all the information I needed, I just did loooaads of past papers - almost all of them. I kept track of the questions I struggled with and went back to them a couple days later after referring to the notes/book I had made.
    I revised very differently for english but that’s probably less useful for you if you’re doing maths/science.
    3) 99% of free periods I spent revising/ working
    4) I worked every weekend and for hours after college during the week. My physics teacher was so **** I had to teach myself the physics syllabus so was spending up to 25 hours on physics a week alone.

    I went from ABBC in AS to A*AA so I must have done something right! (The C was in maths which I carried on)
    Physics is one of, if not, the most challenging a levels out there so it will require more rigorous study than other subjects. You have to really understand principles so you can apply them in new and strange situations.
    Best advice I can give is that if you work hard and you really want it, then you can get the grades you want. Good luck!
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    (Original post by H3n)
    Basically copied and pasted this from a response to someone else asking a similar q.
    I studied English literature, maths and physics and got A*AA.
    1) I found the best way to revise for science and maths was to compile all relevant information onto sheets of paper, stripping back all the unnecessary stuff, so it’s easy to refer to specifics. (Kind of like your own textbook). I did this by scanning and lifting from multiple textbooks and revision guides and using some colour for more important bits (rules or equations). Once I had all the information I needed, I just did loooaads of past papers - almost all of them. I kept track of the questions I struggled with and went back to them a couple days later after referring to the notes/book I had made.
    I revised very differently for english but that’s probably less useful for you if you’re doing maths/science.
    3) 99% of free periods I spent revising/ working
    4) I worked every weekend and for hours after college during the week. My physics teacher was so **** I had to teach myself the physics syllabus so was spending up to 25 hours on physics a week alone.

    I went from ABBC in AS to A*AA so I must have done something right! (The C was in maths which I carried on)
    Physics is one of, if not, the most challenging a levels out there so it will require more rigorous study than other subjects. You have to really understand principles so you can apply them in new and strange situations.
    Best advice I can give is that if you work hard and you really want it, then you can get the grades you want. Good luck!
    Im so happy that you, shared this with me. Thank you. :'-)
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    the forces were with me :teehee:
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    (Original post by the bear)
    the forces were with me :teehee:
    What was your strategy?
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    (Original post by joyoustele)
    What was your strategy?
    work, work & then as a special treat more work :teehee:
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    (Original post by the bear)
    work, work & then as a special treat more work :teehee:
    If i make notes, and do book questions and past papers, would that be enough?
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    Exam questions

    at AS I got a C
    at A level I got an A

    I put in significantly more work at AS by reading the book and copying out the pages. There's a lot of actual physics to be learned by going over the mark scheme and trying to figure out the intricacies of the law from the answer, that you'd likely miss if you just tried reading the definitions.
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    (Original post by joyoustele)
    If i make notes, and do book questions and past papers, would that be enough?
    you must become one with the examiner

    :yep:

    *you will be fine :borat:
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    Do every past paper you can get your hands on - even look through other exam board's papers for relevent questions and attempt those.

    Which exam board are you doing?
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    (Original post by Vindria)
    Exam questions

    at AS I got a C
    at A level I got an A

    I put in significantly more work at AS by reading the book and copying out the pages. There's a lot of actual physics to be learned by going over the mark scheme and trying to figure out the intricacies of the law from the answer, that you'd likely miss if you just tried reading the definitions.
    So is making notes useless? or i should still make notes?

    -Thanks for the advice i will go over the mark scheme more and try to understand them.
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    (Original post by Matt12830)
    Do every past paper you can get your hands on - even look through other exam board's papers for relevent questions and attempt those.

    Which exam board are you doing?
    I am doing OCR, where can i find past papers? One website i know of is Physics and maths tutor, but the past papers are labled unit 1, unit 2, unit 3....
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    (Original post by the bear)
    the forces were with me :teehee:
    What’s does hope smell like
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    (Original post by joyoustele)
    So is making notes useless? or i should still make notes?

    -Thanks for the advice i will go over the mark scheme more and try to understand them.
    Making notes in class might still be useful (if you're actually going to bother reading them) otherwise I'd steer clear. Practice questions reinforce concepts much better than mindlessly writing out pages.
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    (Original post by Vindria)
    Making notes in class might still be useful (if you're actually going to bother reading them) otherwise I'd steer clear. Practice questions reinforce concepts much better than mindlessly writing out pages.
    Thanks, i think i have been doing badly in physics because of just writing and doing minimal questions.

    Im going to do every past paper. Do you know where i could find this?
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    (Original post by joyoustele)
    Thanks, i think i have been doing badly in physics because of just writing and doing minimal questions.

    Im going to do every past paper. Do you know where i could find this?
    Physicsandmathstutor, also, ask your teacher, he might have some additional resources

    And np, physics is a devil of a subject and it's always nice to help
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    (Original post by Fonzworth)
    What’s does hope smell like
    it smells like a fresh pair of socks.
 
 
 
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