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    Ok so I have NEVER been entirely sure what I wanted to be/do later in life (I still have no idea) I am currently taking Psychology, Eng Lang and Media studies for A-Levels and am predicted AAB. (hopefully AAA).

    I know that I want to do something media related BUT it is a very broad - like it ranges from film to animation to photgraphy to TV to radio to communications to special effects etc. Initially, I wanted to apply for generic courses e.g. communication & media studies (loughborough) / film and media (newcastle) /media and culture studies (lancaster) / digital culture (kings college) - quite highly regarded unis.

    After doing more research into these courses, I found that they were very theory based, too theory based eg a large majority of the modules were about history of film/feminism/society and culture etc and I was looking for something more creative, practical and hands on.

    With this in mind, I researched more media based courses and came across something more technical (math-y/science-y like) called 'digital arts/media' which I find quite fascinating. HOWEVER because I am not the biggest fan of maths and science (never have been) my biggest fear is regretting the course and finding the coding/computing modules too difficult. Although, these types of courses do have creative elements such as photography/animation/SFX/visual effects/storytelling which attracted me to it. However most of the unis that offer these types of courses arent as highly regarded as the previous eg sussex/bournemouth/kent/greenwhich - however, would this matter?

    Is it true that creative degrees combined with more technical/mathematical degrees will be more beneficial later on?
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    Pick anything you like!
    You can always change it in the second year and opt for a completely different career no matter what degree you got. Don't worry about it too much!
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    (Original post by lemoncow)
    Ok so I have NEVER been entirely sure what I wanted to be/do later in life (I still have no idea) I am currently taking Psychology, Eng Lang and Media studies for A-Levels and am predicted AAB. (hopefully AAA).

    I know that I want to do something media related BUT it is a very broad - like it ranges from film to animation to photgraphy to TV to radio to communications to special effects etc. Initially, I wanted to apply for generic courses e.g. communication & media studies (loughborough) / film and media (newcastle) /media and culture studies (lancaster) / digital culture (kings college) - quite highly regarded unis.

    After doing more research into these courses, I found that they were very theory based, too theory based eg a large majority of the modules were about history of film/feminism/society and culture etc and I was looking for something more creative, practical and hands on.

    With this in mind, I researched more media based courses and came across something more technical (math-y/science-y like) called 'digital arts/media' which I find quite fascinating. HOWEVER because I am not the biggest fan of maths and science (never have been) my biggest fear is regretting the course and finding the coding/computing modules too difficult. Although, these types of courses do have creative elements such as photography/animation/SFX/visual effects/storytelling which attracted me to it. However most of the unis that offer these types of courses arent as highly regarded as the previous eg sussex/bournemouth/kent/greenwhich - however, would this matter?

    Is it true that creative degrees combined with more technical/mathematical degrees will be more beneficial later on?
    Hello lemoncow,

    I thought you might want to check out Ravensbourne. We are a digital design and media based institution, with a 94.7% employability rate. We offer media foundation course that would be useful if you are not sure on what discipline to specialize in.

    The Media Foundation course offer range of different pathways such as film and photography. With the foundation course, you will be able to experiment all the different pathways and it will help you have a better understanding of what courses you would like to go into. Our courses are very practical, with our students working on live briefs and competitions throughout their time with us. Our students are able to borrow out different industry standard equipment to use during their projects, getting them equipt for the industry.

    I would recommend coming to an open day, where you will get an insight on what the courses are like and also get the change to speak to tutors as well as students. I hope this was helpful, if you have any questions please feel free to ask.

    Katy
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    (Original post by doctorchrystal)
    Pick anything you like!
    You can always change it in the second year and opt for a completely different career no matter what degree you got. Don't worry about it too much!
    Ahhh i guess you're right, i'm probably over thinking this
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    (Original post by Ravensbourne)
    Hello lemoncow,

    I thought you might want to check out Ravensbourne. We are a digital design and media based institution, with a 94.7% employability rate. We offer media foundation course that would be useful if you are not sure on what discipline to specialize in.

    The Media Foundation course offer range of different pathways such as film and photography. With the foundation course, you will be able to experiment all the different pathways and it will help you have a better understanding of what courses you would like to go into. Our courses are very practical, with our students working on live briefs and competitions throughout their time with us. Our students are able to borrow out different industry standard equipment to use during their projects, getting them equipt for the industry.

    I would recommend coming to an open day, where you will get an insight on what the courses are like and also get the change to speak to tutors as well as students. I hope this was helpful, if you have any questions please feel free to ask.

    Katy
    Thanks for this, it was extremely helpful!!! I'll have a look at the course/uni in more detail!
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    (Original post by lemoncow)
    Ok so I have NEVER been entirely sure what I wanted to be/do later in life (I still have no idea) I am currently taking Psychology, Eng Lang and Media studies for A-Levels and am predicted AAB. (hopefully AAA).

    I know that I want to do something media related BUT it is a very broad - like it ranges from film to animation to photgraphy to TV to radio to communications to special effects etc. Initially, I wanted to apply for generic courses e.g. communication & media studies (loughborough) / film and media (newcastle) /media and culture studies (lancaster) / digital culture (kings college) - quite highly regarded unis.

    After doing more research into these courses, I found that they were very theory based, too theory based eg a large majority of the modules were about history of film/feminism/society and culture etc and I was looking for something more creative, practical and hands on.

    With this in mind, I researched more media based courses and came across something more technical (math-y/science-y like) called 'digital arts/media' which I find quite fascinating. HOWEVER because I am not the biggest fan of maths and science (never have been) my biggest fear is regretting the course and finding the coding/computing modules too difficult. Although, these types of courses do have creative elements such as photography/animation/SFX/visual effects/storytelling which attracted me to it. However most of the unis that offer these types of courses arent as highly regarded as the previous eg sussex/bournemouth/kent/greenwhich - however, would this matter?

    Is it true that creative degrees combined with more technical/mathematical degrees will be more beneficial later on?
    I have basically the same problem as you!! I would like to go to a more prestigious university since my grades can allow me. However, those uni offers more of a theory course and also I'm extremely worried that it is hard to find a job with this degree. I'm an international student and the tuition is super high, it's like pursuing your dream or be in reality and major in something that can probably pay off my uni fees sooner. So complicated!
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    Hey Lemoncow,

    Have you ever thought of a film school? We have an extremley practical Filmmaking undergraduate degree where you will learn how to direct, produce, edit, camera operate, lighting, sound and work as a film crew.
    We are located in the centre of Brighton, an amazing student filmmakers city. We have an extremley high employment rate amongst our graduates, all of whom have gone on to work in feature films, documentaries and TV series.
    We have an excellent reputation in the film industry and our students have the BEST time with us.
    If you would like, you're more than welcome to check us out at an open event. Or you can find out more about our Filmmaking and Animation courses here:
    https://brightonfilmschool.co.uk/
    If you have any questions at all about the film industry, progression and portfolio advice or about Brighton Film School, please let me know

    Holly


    (Original post by lemoncow)
    Ok so I have NEVER been entirely sure what I wanted to be/do later in life (I still have no idea) I am currently taking Psychology, Eng Lang and Media studies for A-Levels and am predicted AAB. (hopefully AAA).

    I know that I want to do something media related BUT it is a very broad - like it ranges from film to animation to photgraphy to TV to radio to communications to special effects etc. Initially, I wanted to apply for generic courses e.g. communication & media studies (loughborough) / film and media (newcastle) /media and culture studies (lancaster) / digital culture (kings college) - quite highly regarded unis.

    After doing more research into these courses, I found that they were very theory based, too theory based eg a large majority of the modules were about history of film/feminism/society and culture etc and I was looking for something more creative, practical and hands on.

    With this in mind, I researched more media based courses and came across something more technical (math-y/science-y like) called 'digital arts/media' which I find quite fascinating. HOWEVER because I am not the biggest fan of maths and science (never have been) my biggest fear is regretting the course and finding the coding/computing modules too difficult. Although, these types of courses do have creative elements such as photography/animation/SFX/visual effects/storytelling which attracted me to it. However most of the unis that offer these types of courses arent as highly regarded as the previous eg sussex/bournemouth/kent/greenwhich - however, would this matter?

    Is it true that creative degrees combined with more technical/mathematical degrees will be more beneficial later on?
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    As a student aiming for AAA, I highly recommend you do not go to a university with low entry standards, or do a degree in a soft subject because you thought it looked more fun. The chances are you will regret it 5 years later once you realise how difficult it is to get a job in this field.

    Please ignore the terrible advice like "it doesn't matter what or where you study", or "just do what you enjoy". Your degree is not about having fun, it's about developing you as a person.
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    (Original post by Brighton Film School)
    We have an extremley high employment rate amongst our graduates, all of whom have gone on to work in feature films, documentaries and TV series.
    Blimey Holly - that's quite a claim to make
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    (Original post by Sunnie_yth)
    I have basically the same problem as you!! I would like to go to a more prestigious university since my grades can allow me. However, those uni offers more of a theory course and also I'm extremely worried that it is hard to find a job with this degree. I'm an international student and the tuition is super high, it's like pursuing your dream or be in reality and major in something that can probably pay off my uni fees sooner. So complicated!
    Hey ikr its so frustrating!! What unis/courses are you thinking of applying to and what are you predicted? (you dont have to post them) have you found any good unis offering digital media/media?
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    (Original post by chazwomaq)
    As a student aiming for AAA, I highly recommend you do not go to a university with low entry standards, or do a degree in a soft subject because you thought it looked more fun. The chances are you will regret it 5 years later once you realise how difficult it is to get a job in this field.

    Please ignore the terrible advice like "it doesn't matter what or where you study", or "just do what you enjoy". Your degree is not about having fun, it's about developing you as a person.
    Hi, I've been told this from time to time and still am very confused. The problem is, the subjects which I have taken; Eng lang, psych, and media will only allow me to apply for so many courses ie maths/science is out of the question. I'm not doing a soft subject because it's fun, but I genuinely enjoy it and would like to pursue a career in media/film one day. However, 'media' is so, very broad and I am perplexed about which road to go down. I do wish I had a passion for more 'prestigious' subjects but unfortunately I don't. Plus, my personal statement is in the process of being written and I have already based it around digital media.
    I do understand your point of view and agree with you very much so. What further advice could you give?
    Thanks
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    (Original post by Brighton Film School)
    Hey Lemoncow,

    Have you ever thought of a film school? We have an extremley practical Filmmaking undergraduate degree where you will learn how to direct, produce, edit, camera operate, lighting, sound and work as a film crew.
    We are located in the centre of Brighton, an amazing student filmmakers city. We have an extremley high employment rate amongst our graduates, all of whom have gone on to work in feature films, documentaries and TV series.
    We have an excellent reputation in the film industry and our students have the BEST time with us.
    If you would like, you're more than welcome to check us out at an open event. Or you can find out more about our Filmmaking and Animation courses here:
    https://brightonfilmschool.co.uk/
    If you have any questions at all about the film industry, progression and portfolio advice or about Brighton Film School, please let me know

    Holly
    Oh wow I've never seen a uni with a 100% employment rate! Are you sure this is true? Also what type of film/TV companies have these students been employed in and do you know their average salary?
    Thanks!
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    Hi Lemoncow,

    We don't have a 100% employment rate, but the students that are employed in the film and television industry are working in feature films, documentaries, TV series and some commericial work - mainly in the UK.

    TV companies include BBC, Channel 4 and Sky and UK film production companies such as Pinewood Studios. However, a lot of our graduates undertake freelance work. There is a great blog on our website, which is written by one of our Film Production students, Viv, who graduated in June. Viv talks about all of the amazing work she has done since graduating, you can read this here, I think you might find it really useful:
    https://brightonfilmschool.co.uk/bre...hool-graduate/
    Average salaries amongst our students vary. A lot of our graduates are freelancers in the industry in different departments such as gaffers, cinematographers, camera operators, editors, sound recordists and ADs. On some jobs, they get paid up to £1,000 for 7-10 days work, on other jobs its daily or monthly salary.

    If you would like to talk to a graduate, I'm more than happy to put you in touch with one who can share their experience of working in the film industry with you?

    Holly

    (Original post by lemoncow)
    Oh wow I've never seen a uni with a 100% employment rate! Are you sure this is true? Also what type of film/TV companies have these students been employed in and do you know their average salary?
    Thanks!
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    (Original post by lemoncow)
    Hey ikr its so frustrating!! What unis/courses are you thinking of applying to and what are you predicted? (you dont have to post them) have you found any good unis offering digital media/media?
    I don't do A levels, I'm gonna have to go through foundation since I follow a 12 year education system here in Taiwan. They look at high school GPA and English ability. I'm thinking about Bristol's film and media, Newcastle's media or combined honors, and Sussex's media production. I thought these might not be that much theory based looking at their modules.I don't really know though, I'm still researching!! By the way, I relate to you so much, I'm terrible at math and science as well!!!
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    Anyone wanting to 'do' or 'make' things - films, tv programmes etc - would most likely do best to take a practical course rather than a theory-based one - ignoring the false attraction of attending a 'prestigious' uni with high (but irrelevant) A-level requirements.
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    (Original post by lemoncow)
    Is it true that creative degrees combined with more technical/mathematical degrees will be more beneficial later on?
    Entry routes for the media are still very flexible, so it's not like there's one "best" degree to take. You could do something like an English degree at a Russell Group uni, get super involved in the student media scene, and pick up a bunch of media production skills that way while still leaving your options open for other careers.
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    (Original post by Sunnie_yth)
    I don't do A levels, I'm gonna have to go through foundation since I follow a 12 year education system here in Taiwan. They look at high school GPA and English ability. I'm thinking about Bristol's film and media, Newcastle's media or combined honors, and Sussex's media production. I thought these might not be that much theory based looking at their modules.I don't really know though, I'm still researching!! By the way, I relate to you so much, I'm terrible at math and science as well!!!
    I was looking at sussex too, let me know how you get on! Also, what have you included in your personal statement? and do you know of anyone that could help with it? Thanks x
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    (Original post by Persephone K)
    Entry routes for the media are still very flexible, so it's not like there's one "best" degree to take. You could do something like an English degree at a Russell Group uni, get super involved in the student media scene, and pick up a bunch of media production skills that way while still leaving your options open for other careers.
    Hmm, not a bad idea, however my only worry is not enjoying the course and failing first year! Our career advisor has told us to pursue some we love/will enjoy. And of course failing at a prestigious uni would be worse than acing the course at less well known uni?
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    (Original post by lemoncow)
    I'm not doing a soft subject because it's fun, but I genuinely enjoy it and would like to pursue a career in media/film one day.
    You and a billion other people, that's the problem. My main advice would be "have a plan B" i.e. what do you do if you can't get a decent career in media? Will your university choices give you other options in other fields?

    It's a shame you chose weaker options at A level given you are a bright student. I think you should endeavour to make sure all your other aspects are very strong i.e. the entry standards of the university you choose, your work experience, getting As (or A*s), a 1st and so on.
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    (Original post by lemoncow)
    Ok so I have NEVER been entirely sure what I wanted to be/do later in life (I still have no idea) I am currently taking Psychology, Eng Lang and Media studies for A-Levels and am predicted AAB. (hopefully AAA).

    I know that I want to do something media related BUT it is a very broad - like it ranges from film to animation to photgraphy to TV to radio to communications to special effects etc. Initially, I wanted to apply for generic courses e.g. communication & media studies (loughborough) / film and media (newcastle) /media and culture studies (lancaster) / digital culture (kings college) - quite highly regarded unis.

    After doing more research into these courses, I found that they were very theory based, too theory based eg a large majority of the modules were about history of film/feminism/society and culture etc and I was looking for something more creative, practical and hands on.

    With this in mind, I researched more media based courses and came across something more technical (math-y/science-y like) called 'digital arts/media' which I find quite fascinating. HOWEVER because I am not the biggest fan of maths and science (never have been) my biggest fear is regretting the course and finding the coding/computing modules too difficult. Although, these types of courses do have creative elements such as photography/animation/SFX/visual effects/storytelling which attracted me to it. However most of the unis that offer these types of courses arent as highly regarded as the previous eg sussex/bournemouth/kent/greenwhich - however, would this matter?

    Is it true that creative degrees combined with more technical/mathematical degrees will be more beneficial later on?
    Have you looked into art foundation diplomas?

    There are quite a few that are lens/media based that would give you a year to experiment in different areas and do more research into the various options available. https://www.ravensbourne.ac.uk/study...ia-production/ https://aub.ac.uk/courses/preparatio...-design-media/ (and UCA offer a lens based route IIRR).

    These courses are classed as FE and often are available at your local FE college as well. There's no fees if you're under 19 (but also no maintenance loan to live off which is why most people study locally). That means these courses don't eat into your university funding allowance and they also don't commit you to studying at a specific university. Most will include help to apply through UCAS (even if you decide that actually a creative degree isn't for you....it's designed to let you experiment without committing you to a specific pathway).

    If you want to take a media related course then it's a very good idea to go for courses that are accredited by industry (http://creativeskillset.org/search/3...=Undergraduate ) - like you say these universities don't always rate highly in league tables but they have got industry involvement in the design and teaching of their courses which means you should graduate "industry ready". A theoretical course will not do that - you'd have to chase for industry experience and build your CV in your free time and holidays and would be competing against the graduates of these courses with more practical experience.

    Theoretical courses like those at Lancaster and KCL will prepare you for a career in marketing...which if that's what you're interested in then you're better taking a more general marketing degree that will incorporate digital media as well as other aspects. Other courses are often just rebranded graphic design courses - again often an actual graphic design degree would be a better bet than something overly specialised (particularly if you're wanting to keep your options open).
 
 
 
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