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    Any tips for English lang paper 1?

    Any specific langauge features to look out for?

    Any specific structural features?

    Tips for question 5?
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    You could look at Mr Bruff in YouTube. I've got loads of resources with questions and level 4 answers. I can send them to you if you like. Mainly, the Target book helped me with my GCSE last year. The question and revision guide are really good. Also, if you can't find them, look at your local library for revision guides.
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    Structural features. This is a tricky one. There is cyclical structure,where the author refers to something in both the beginning and end. I think it would help if you break it down. Wait, are you homeschooled? Anyways, go on the BBC Bitesize website to see all the techniques needed.
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    (Original post by Hellon)
    Structural features. This is a tricky one. There is cyclical structure,where the author refers to something in both the beginning and end. I think it would help if you break it down. Wait, are you homeschooled? Anyways, go on the BBC Bitesize website to see all the techniques needed.
    Ok I’ll have a look - no I am not homeschooled
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    Shall I send you an example of a level 4 answer for question 5?
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    (Original post by Hellon)
    Shall I send you an example of a level 4 answer for question 5?
    Sure
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    Here's the answer.
    Name:  20171022_223753.jpg
Views: 38
Size:  505.7 KB
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    And here is the question.
    Name:  20171022_223649.jpg
Views: 37
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    Sorry if it took too long. I hope it's helpful, and if you do find it helpful, that is, don't be afraid to ask for more.
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    I'm in year 11, although I did my English language paper last year and (somehow) got a 9 by:
    -buying a workbook (found the revision guides pointless) and doing question after question
    -Watching a Mr Bruff video on a particular question, making notes and typing up his example and printing it out before annotating why it got full marks, then attempting a question corresponding to the one I watched
    -Nailing the timings- this is very important, especially if you're someone like me who could happily write for an hour on question 2. Our teacher drilled it into our heads so much it wasn't even of a question of whether or not I'd start question 5 with 45 minutes to spare even if I hadn't finished question 4 yet, so it was second nature by the time the exam rolled around
    -For question 5, I made flashcards of 9 common positive words (brave, light, good..) and 9 negative words (evil, loud, dark...and found 4 more advanced synonyms of these and got people to test me on them until I could say them, and spell them, right. even if you remember them all under the pressure of exam conditions, do not be tempted to use them all. In my exam, I think I only used four, max, and was really angry at myself at it until I got my result. I think if I had used more, it would have sounded forced and pretentious, which is not what you want. You want your work to have control and flow, like you came out the womb using the word 'caliginous'.
    -Make sure you go into question 5 with an open mind. Don't think "I am going to do a narrative, no matter what the stimulus is" because it might be something you aren't keen on writing, and you haven't practised writing a description. I personally lean towards a narrative, but if I don't get an idea within 30 seconds of reading the question, I do a description.
    -If you're doing a narrative, be original. If the image is an idyllic paradise, make the tone dark. Take the smallest detail and roll with it. Someone told me their teacher told them not to include death because it was cliche. In my mock, I ended it by having the character commit suicide. In the real thing, I made sure I avoided death. That could have been the line between an 8 or a 9. You never know which little tip will push you over the boundary.
    -For a narrative, not much should happen. It's usually an opening they ask you to write, and you only have forty minutes to write anyway, so they won't be expecting a full blown novel. Most of the writing should be internal, and physically, there shouldn't be a whole lot going in on. In my exam, the only physical activity was that a girl said a few words while lying on a bed, and the rest was either her thoughts or recollection of past events.
    -For a narrative, another thing I would advise is to have any names ready in your head to save time umming and ahhing about whether to name her 'Jeanette' or 'Geraldine'. No, you don't have time for that. Time is your enemy here, and you need to put as much of it as possible towards actually answering the questions. Or, even better, do what I did and write in 1st person. If you play in carefully, no names are needed.
    -If you're doing a description, try and make your structure interesting. It's very easy to conform to a set structure for a description, which I did, but try and shake it up a little to avoid similar structured and sized paragraphs, so try and vary it a little. A format I swore by was to focus on the scene as a whole (usually with a dark tone, regardless of the image.. apparently i can't write happy), then zoom in on something, zoom in on something else, a one sentence paragraph (usually with a semicolon thrown in) to describe a change (almost always something along the lines of "then, a disturbance, a flicker; a ripple in the water") and the final paragraph mirrors the first (get that cyclical structure), except there's a change (usually the light has fought the dark).
    -Heads up for the description: you don't have to adhere to the picture completely. Sure, if it's a picture of a cave don't write about a forest, but if there are no trees on the picture, you can add trees if you want.
    -Most pupils tend to go for the description. If you're great at both, the narrative might give you originality points.
    -As said in the above post, Mr Bruff is great. I found him more helpful for Section A while Mr Salles was more helpful for Section B
    -And finally, DO NOT use the old spec papers. Don't even think about it. Step away. If you do the old spec, you'll come out with great A*-G technique and non-existent 9-1 technique, and you'll be hella shocked and confused in the actual exam. If you want practice papers, there's the specimen one on the AQA website, and you get a full practice paper at the back of a workbook. If you're desperate like I was, you can buy two full sets off amazon for £5, or, even better, just ask your teacher to write you some.
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    (Original post by troubletracking)
    I'm in year 11, although I did my English language paper last year and (somehow) got a 9 by:
    -buying a workbook (found the revision guides pointless) and doing question after question
    -Watching a Mr Bruff video on a particular question, making notes and typing up his example and printing it out before annotating why it got full marks, then attempting a question corresponding to the one I watched
    -Nailing the timings- this is very important, especially if you're someone like me who could happily write for an hour on question 2. Our teacher drilled it into our heads so much it wasn't even of a question of whether or not I'd start question 5 with 45 minutes to spare even if I hadn't finished question 4 yet, so it was second nature by the time the exam rolled around
    -For question 5, I made flashcards of 9 common positive words (brave, light, good..) and 9 negative words (evil, loud, dark...and found 4 more advanced synonyms of these and got people to test me on them until I could say them, and spell them, right. even if you remember them all under the pressure of exam conditions, do not be tempted to use them all. In my exam, I think I only used four, max, and was really angry at myself at it until I got my result. I think if I had used more, it would have sounded forced and pretentious, which is not what you want. You want your work to have control and flow, like you came out the womb using the word 'caliginous'.
    -Make sure you go into question 5 with an open mind. Don't think "I am going to do a narrative, no matter what the stimulus is" because it might be something you aren't keen on writing, and you haven't practised writing a description. I personally lean towards a narrative, but if I don't get an idea within 30 seconds of reading the question, I do a description.
    -If you're doing a narrative, be original. If the image is an idyllic paradise, make the tone dark. Take the smallest detail and roll with it. Someone told me their teacher told them not to include death because it was cliche. In my mock, I ended it by having the character commit suicide. In the real thing, I made sure I avoided death. That could have been the line between an 8 or a 9. You never know which little tip will push you over the boundary.
    -For a narrative, not much should happen. It's usually an opening they ask you to write, and you only have forty minutes to write anyway, so they won't be expecting a full blown novel. Most of the writing should be internal, and physically, there shouldn't be a whole lot going in on. In my exam, the only physical activity was that a girl said a few words while lying on a bed, and the rest was either her thoughts or recollection of past events.
    -For a narrative, another thing I would advise is to have any names ready in your head to save time umming and ahhing about whether to name her 'Jeanette' or 'Geraldine'. No, you don't have time for that. Time is your enemy here, and you need to put as much of it as possible towards actually answering the questions. Or, even better, do what I did and write in 1st person. If you play in carefully, no names are needed.
    -If you're doing a description, try and make your structure interesting. It's very easy to conform to a set structure for a description, which I did, but try and shake it up a little to avoid similar structured and sized paragraphs, so try and vary it a little. A format I swore by was to focus on the scene as a whole (usually with a dark tone, regardless of the image.. apparently i can't write happy), then zoom in on something, zoom in on something else, a one sentence paragraph (usually with a semicolon thrown in) to describe a change (almost always something along the lines of "then, a disturbance, a flicker; a ripple in the water" and the final paragraph mirrors the first (get that cyclical structure), except there's a change (usually the light has fought the dark).
    -Heads up for the description: you don't have to adhere to the picture completely. Sure, if it's a picture of a cave don't write about a forest, but if there are no trees on the picture, you can add trees if you want.
    -Most pupils tend to go for the description. If you're great at both, the narrative might give you originality points.
    -As said in the above post, Mr Bruff is great. I found him more helpful for Section A while Mr Salles was more helpful for Section B
    -And finally, DO NOT use the old spec papers. Don't even think about it. Step away. If you do the old spec, you'll come out with great A*-G technique and non-existent 9-1 technique, and you'll be hella shocked and confused in the actual exam. If you want practice papers, there's the specimen one on the AQA website, and you get a full practice paper at the back of a workbook. If you're desperate like I was, you can buy two full sets off amazon for £5, or, even better, just ask your teacher to write you some.
    Thank you dude!

    I’ve never actually wrote a narrative piece in an exam before - I always go with descriptive. It’s cause I’ve never actually been told how to write in narrative style. I will have to practice writing narrative then.
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    For paper 1,

    a) Get to know what is required for each question, and how much time you have for each.

    b) Find out your strong places and weak areas, so you can work on the later.

    c) You'll need to know sentence structure, technical devices and be able to pick them out in the reading piece.

    d) Remember the simple stuff like capital letters, punctuation, paragraph beginnings etc.

    e) MAKE SURE OTHERS CAN READ YOUR WRITING. One of my fellow class members knew her stuff, but even the best among us couldn't read her scribble.

    f) Make sure you write in paragraphs, that have a line in between.

    g) Know your discourse markers, isolated sentences.

    h) Practice your creative writing, that is question 5, and know the difference between a descriptive piece and a story.

    i) Make sure you practice those spellings you get wrong. If it is a device or technique you can always describe it in the exam if you can't remember the correct name.

    j) Learn how to edit your work quickly, and to finish a little earlier then needed to give you time to do it.
 
 
 
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