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    For Geology, at some universities, there is the option to do it as a Bachelors for 3 years or a Masters for 4 years.

    Say if I did the 3-year course for Geology, would I be able to stay on for another year and do something like Engineering Geology, or would I have to apply as a post-graduate? Also, would I be able to do a Masters in Geophysics with a Bachelors in Geology with no Maths A-Level?

    Thanks for the help, I'm still not 100% confident with the uni system
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    (Original post by Fonzworth)
    For Geology, at some universities, there is the option to do it as a Bachelors for 3 years or a Masters for 4 years.

    Say if I did the 3-year course for Geology, would I be able to stay on for another year and do something like Engineering Geology, or would I have to apply as a post-graduate? Also, would I be able to do a Masters in Geophysics with a Bachelors in Geology with no Maths A-Level?

    Thanks for the help, I'm still not 100% confident with the uni system
    Traditionally, you had three-year undergraduate bachelor's courses (e.g. BSc Geology) and then one-year master's courses (e.g. MSc Geology). After you finished your BSc, you apply to do an MSc - it's a completely separate qualification so you have to apply from anew and it has its own fee structure etc.

    Because so many jobs in the sciences now ask for Master's degrees, integrated master's programmes have become popular. These are four-year undergraduate programmes where you get one qualification at the end which is equivalent to a Master's degree. Contrary to the BSc+MSc option, you don't become a graduate until the end of the programme.

    The main advantages of an integrated masters degree is that it's simpler and less hassle than having to go through the entire uncertainty of a new application process again after your BSc. The disadvantage is that you will probably have fewer opportunities to specialise in your taught master's level courses. For example, if you were interested in petroleum geology, you wouldn't be able to focus entirely on that if you did an integrated master's degree whereas you would if you did a Geology BSc and then a specialist petroleum geology MSc.

    If you apply for a Geology BSc but the department you're studying at also offers a Geology MGeol/MSci/etc (i.e. a 4-year integrated masters), the first three years are generally identical or near-identical so it is often possible to transfer between them, but departments tend to recommend applying for the master's instead of the bachelor's because it's generally easier to switch to the BSc than to the MSci. If you're talking about transferring to a free-standing master's (e.g. a MSc) then even if it's in the same department, you would have to apply like everybody else.

    In terms of whether you'd be able to do a Geophysics-related masters with a Geology BSc with no mathematical background... possibly but your options are going to be limited. I've had a quick browse and looked at three programmes - they basically require you to have proven ability in geophysics/mathematics/physics so if you've not done any particularly maths heavy modules as part of your BSc then you're going to have issues.
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    Traditionally, you had three-year undergraduate bachelor's courses (e.g. BSc Geology) and then one-year master's courses (e.g. MSc Geology). After you finished your BSc, you apply to do an MSc - it's a completely separate qualification so you have to apply from anew and it has its own fee structure etc.

    Because so many jobs in the sciences now ask for Master's degrees, integrated master's programmes have become popular. These are four-year undergraduate programmes where you get one qualification at the end which is equivalent to a Master's degree. Contrary to the BSc+MSc option, you don't become a graduate until the end of the programme.

    The main advantages of an integrated masters degree is that it's simpler and less hassle than having to go through the entire uncertainty of a new application process again after your BSc. The disadvantage is that you will probably have fewer opportunities to specialise in your taught master's level courses. For example, if you were interested in petroleum geology, you wouldn't be able to focus entirely on that if you did an integrated master's degree whereas you would if you did a Geology BSc and then a specialist petroleum geology MSc.

    If you apply for a Geology BSc but the department you're studying at also offers a Geology MGeol/MSci/etc (i.e. a 4-year integrated masters), the first three years are generally identical or near-identical so it is often possible to transfer between them, but departments tend to recommend applying for the master's instead of the bachelor's because it's generally easier to switch to the BSc than to the MSci. If you're talking about transferring to a free-standing master's (e.g. a MSc) then even if it's in the same department, you would have to apply like everybody else.

    In terms of whether you'd be able to do a Geophysics-related masters with a Geology BSc with no mathematical background... possibly but your options are going to be limited. I've had a quick browse and looked at three programmes - they basically require you to have proven ability in geophysics/mathematics/physics so if you've not done any particularly maths heavy modules as part of your BSc then you're going to have issues.
    I’ve done Physics at A-Level if that makes a difference? Thanks for the help
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    (Original post by Fonzworth)
    I’ve done Physics at A-Level if that makes a difference? Thanks for the help
    Entry requirements for postgraduate degrees aren't as clear-cut as they are for undergraduate degrees so each application will be reviewed for its own merit but you do need to view this from a university's point of view - who are they going to be more interested in recruiting for a geophysics programme, somebody who's undergraduate degree is in physics or someone who's got an A Level in physics? I'm sure you know this, but physics at degree level isn't trivial and it's not really something that A Level physics (which really doesn't go beyond GCSE-level maths) can compare with.

    If you are serious about wanting to go into geophysics then definitely make sure you choose an undergraduate programme that gives you an opportunity to study some geophysics-related programmes. You're simply not going to be able to get through the work unless you've done a reasonable about of calculus before. Also, it may be possible to do your fourth-year research project on geophysics in a geology degree depending on your department (but again, you will need to be reasonably mathematically competent by then).
 
 
 
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