Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    Can somebody please tell me if I would get a good mark on this question, as I am trying to work on timings, so I had to cut down this answer a lot. The question was:
    How does the writer use language to describe the ferocity of the weather?

    My answer:
    Firstly, the writer uses a grave tone throughout the extract to describe ther effects of the weather, which leaves the children 'drenched' and 'aghast'. The more complex vocabulary used here, as opposed to just 'wet' for example, really emphasises the extremity and ferocity of the weather, and perhaps how the event is out of the ordinary.
    Furthermore, the writer personifies the weather when they describe how the lightning was 'playing' and the rain 'hammering.' This technique implies that the weather is almost part of a game - a game of endless, ongoing torture, shown through the use of these present participles. It is so ferocious that it seems as if the storm will never end.
    Finally, throughout the extract, the writer consistently employs relatively short, compound sentences. For example, 'only thunder was heard and the hammering of the rain.' These simple phrases could perhaps be representative of each roll of thunder, and seeing as the structure of these sentences never ceases, they emphasise the ongoing intensity of the storm. The short outbursts of text help to really convey the ferocity and never-ending atmosphere of the weather on that Sunday evening.
    Online

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IzzHac)
    Can somebody please tell me if I would get a good mark on this question, as I am trying to work on timings, so I had to cut down this answer a lot. The question was:
    How does the writer use language to describe the ferocity of the weather?

    My answer:
    Firstly, the writer uses a grave tone throughout the extract to describe ther effects of the weather, which leaves the children 'drenched' and 'aghast'. The more complex vocabulary used here, as opposed to just 'wet' for example, really emphasises the extremity and ferocity of the weather, and perhaps how the event is out of the ordinary.
    Furthermore, the writer personifies the weather when they describe how the lightning was 'playing' and the rain 'hammering.' This technique implies that the weather is almost part of a game - a game of endless, ongoing torture, shown through the use of these present participles. It is so ferocious that it seems as if the storm will never end.
    Finally, throughout the extract, the writer consistently employs relatively short, compound sentences. For example, 'only thunder was heard and the hammering of the rain.' These simple phrases could perhaps be representative of each roll of thunder, and seeing as the structure of these sentences never ceases, they emphasise the ongoing intensity of the storm. The short outbursts of text help to really convey the ferocity and never-ending atmosphere of the weather on that Sunday evening.
    That's a good effort. You have focused on a relatively small number of examples and analysed them in detail, with some good comments about the effect of the language. It's about 5 or 6 out of 8, with the best paragraph being the second one.
    To improve, look at the extract as a whole. Try to identify and comment on different uses of language within the piece. The writer describes the storm itself (as you have identified) but this is matched by the description of the people. There is a semantic field of fear, 'fled', 'afraid', 'haunted' which tells the reader that the storm is terrifying. Overall, the ferocity is shown through the dramatic language which helps us to hear the rain, and the description of the characters which emphasise how afraid they are.
    You don't need to write any more than this. If necessary the first paragraph could go, because the analysis of your two examples is a little vague.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: October 25, 2017
Poll
Are you going to a festival?
Useful resources

Make your revision easier

OMAM

Ultimate Of Mice And Men Thread

Plot, context, character analysis and everything in between.

Notes

Revision Hub

All our revision materials in one place

Love books

Common grammar and vocabulary problems

Get your questions asked and answered

Useful literary websitesStudy help rules and posting guidelines

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.