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Need help. Anyone knows anything about the life of a hospital doctor. Watch

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    Hi

    Can anyone answer these questions.

    A. The line of authority and accountability to and from personnel.

    B. How they work in a team

    C. How they organise (daily, weekly)

    D. What routines they have e.g work schedules, briefing etc

    E. How they report results

    F. How they use scientific terminology
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    What’s this for?
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    There's a huge variation in roles under the umbrella of "hospital doctor." The answers for an FY1 on a generic ward-based job would be very different from, say, a consultant radiologist. What exactly are you looking for?
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    There's a huge variation in roles under the umbrella of "hospital doctor." The answers for an FY1 on a generic ward-based job would be very different from, say, a consultant radiologist. What exactly are you looking for?
    A surgeon
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    OK, so even narrowing it down to "a surgeon" there's still a huge range of answers depending on the seniority. A FY1 in surgery will be spending most of their time on the wards and have a different routine from an SHO, which is different from a registrar, which is different from a consultant. Answers are in bold, but as your questions are a bit vague I might have missed the point on some of them - if you need more clarification just ask.
    (Original post by -Adz)
    Hi

    Can anyone answer these questions.

    A. The line of authority and accountability to and from personnel. A bit complicated. On a day-to-day basis, junior doctors are supervised clinically by more senior trainees and consultants. The consultants will have a clinical director within their department and an overall hospital medical director to whom they are answerable. There are also non-clinical divisional managers for surgical departments, who may technically be the doctor's line manager even if they never actually see them.

    B. How they work in a team Lots of different teams - the old school "firm" of consultant with dedicated registrar, SHO and FY1 is on the way out, but there will still be some combination of doctors working together on the wards, seeing admissions and in theatre each day. Obviously there are also nurses, physios, dieticians etc on the ward which the doctors have to work with, and in theatres the team is different again with anaesthetists, ODPs and scrub staff.

    C. How they organise (daily, weekly) Not sure what you mean by this.

    D. What routines they have e.g work schedules, briefing etc Hugely variable. As a junior, generally they do a mix of normal days (~8am-5pm), long days/late shifts (finishing around 9pm) and nights. Working between 1:4-1:8 weekends is normal. There will be a mix of time on the wards, in A&E/surgical admissions, in outpatient clinic and in theatre - not all in one day!

    E. How they report results Blood results, histopathology, radiology etc is usually all available on computers, if these need to be communicated to patients then one of the team will do this. If you mean results of operations, most surgical departments will have regular meetings where they review numbers of operations done and discuss any complications etc.

    F. How they use scientific terminology It's just part of everyday language, there's not really a specific way of doing it. Obviously they usually try to make it more accessible when talking to patients, but like all specialties there's a certain amount of jargon when talking to each other
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    Is this h/w?
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    (Original post by starfab)
    Is this h/w?
    No
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    Watch "Junior Doctors" may help you get a bit of an insight
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    (Original post by OwlOfFire)
    Watch "Junior Doctors" may help you get a bit of an insight
    I was about to start watching casualty again.
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    OK, so even narrowing it down to "a surgeon" there's still a huge range of answers depending on the seniority. A FY1 in surgery will be spending most of their time on the wards and have a different routine from an SHO, which is different from a registrar, which is different from a consultant. Answers are in bold, but as your questions are a bit vague I might have missed the point on some of them - if you need more clarification just ask.
    For B the question was ‘how they organise in a laboratory (daily,weekly etc)’
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    (Original post by -Adz)
    For B the question was ‘how they organise in a laboratory (daily,weekly etc)’
    Surgeons do not routinely spend time in a laboratory.
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    Surgeons do not routinely spend time in a laboratory.
    Yeah i know that, just wanted to let’s you know as you didn’t get what I had previously said. And thanks for the information really helped.
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    (Original post by -Adz)
    I was about to start watching casualty again.
    Casualty is more of the total emergency life threatening situations, it doesn't really show the day to day life of a doctor.
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    (Original post by -Adz)
    I was about to start watching casualty again.
    Good idea, Casualty will give you an excellent impression on not what only a doctor does, but an exact real life dramatisation of how a modern emergency department works. I'm sure the other healthcare professionals who use TSR will agree with me on the authenticity of this programme.
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    (Original post by moonkatt)
    Good idea, Casualty will give you an excellent impression on not what only a doctor does, but an exact real life dramatisation of how a modern emergency department works. I'm sure the other healthcare professionals who use TSR will agree with me on the authenticity of this programme.
    We are also all really good looking and regularly interrupt patient care to have deep and meaningful conversations/sex with other members of staff.
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    Surgeons do not routinely spend time in a laboratory.
    Update for the B question, it actuall means how they organise in the place they do work
 
 
 
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