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Wanting to leave Islam but can't! HELP Watch

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    I have been brought up to be an Ahmadi Muslim but over time I have started doubting the religion. Recently, I have discovered that I do not agree with the religion at all and would like to stop wearing the head scarf (which i was forced to wear) and want to stop following the teachings of Islam. However, if I leave Islam, my family will dis-own me and I know this as my uncle and aunt left Islam and the whole family has lost contact with them. What should I do?
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    im also muslim myself 😊 i was feeling something like this long time ago but now i know why. because i never getting really close to them. believe me, i did so many stupid things but Allah keeps giving me the way and miracle. you wont believe what happen after i read the quran. it happen twice to me.

    well, i just can make you analogies. There is a barbershop but still so many people having a long and messy hair. its because they dont go to the barbershop. the same like god. its because you dont go to him.


    well, im just saying. i hope you can consider and think about it wisely. you’ll the one who will make a decision. so do it wisely and follow your heart

    goodluck
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    Brother dw you do not need to embark on any formal process to leave the religion of Islam, as you mention you are an Ahmadi, in the most bluntest but truest of words you are not a Muslim so I reconsider your question as your fear of leaving the Ahmadiyya community and encountering hostility as a result. In which case I'd advise you to curse the culture in your heart, conceal your beliefs and openly express them the moment you feel you are in safety.
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    (Original post by logiclad87)
    Brother dw you do not need to embark on any formal process to leave the religion of Islam, as you mention you are an Ahmadi, in the most bluntest but truest of words you are not a Muslim so I reconsider your question as your fear of leaving the Ahmadiyya community and encountering hostility as a result. In which case I'd advise you to curse the culture in your heart, conceal your beliefs and openly express them the moment you feel you are in safety.
    *Brother or Sister
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    don't leave

    how are you going to live after you leave, will you change all your way of living
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    (Original post by logiclad87)
    Brother dw you do not need to embark on any formal process to leave the religion of Islam, as you mention you are an Ahmadi, in the most bluntest but truest of words you are not a Muslim so I reconsider your question as your fear of leaving the Ahmadiyya community and encountering hostility as a result. In which case I'd advise you to curse the culture in your heart, conceal your beliefs and openly express them the moment you feel you are in safety.
    savage
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    I'm a Muslim and I urge you to leave the Ahmadiyya community, it's your choice they cannot dictate the way your heart feels
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    can someone explain to me in lay terms what an ahmadiya is? im so confused
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    Don't try to leave immediately. I am an Agnostic (self-declared) but since I was born in a Muslim family, I guess I have been "moulded" into the religion so there are still some teachings in Islam that I agree with which is synonymous with other major religions but none of them is to do with Allah. Just take your time and explore all the possibilities. I may be just at a phase myself and later, I may become a devout Muslim if I feel any sort of "connection" with Islam. Right now, I am content with my spiritual state.
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    It’s funny how every muslim that gets raised in a extremely religious family and not normally religious muslims end up leaving their religion. You don’t know the purpose of Islam but have rather been forced to see it. Take for instance the hijab. You cannot know the true meaning of it which is modesty if you had it enforced onto you without your own conscience making a decision. I think what you lack is tolerance and you cannot gain that within the context of Islam anymore.
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    Wait til you leave home (when you can sustain yourself), then you can do whatever you want.
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    (Original post by yesmynameis)
    can someone explain to me in lay terms what an ahmadiya is? im so confused
    A cult founded by Mirza Ghulam Ahmad of Qadian in 1889. The reason why this group has nothing to do with Islam and every Ahmadi is regarded as a non-muslim is because the fundamentals of the religion contradict Islam.

    Islam teaches there will be no Prophet after Prophet Muhammed:
    The title khatam an-nabiyyin or khatim an-nabiyyin, usually translated as "Seal of the Prophets", is applied to Muhammad in verse 33:40 of the Qur'an
    Also in the Hadith it is reported the Prophet Muhammed said:
    And the line of prophets has come to its final end in me.
    (Muslim, Tirmidhi, Ibn Majah)

    Yet despite these clear cut teachings the Ahmadiyya hail Mirza Ghulam as a Prophet, failing to reconcile their beliefs with the Islamic texts and are deemed as non-muslims just as any other people (Hindus, Buddhists etc.)
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    I'm not muslim myself so I can't comment on the formalities, but in general I'd say you need to do whats right for you, not anyone else. Are there any support groups in your community for those who are thinking about or have left the religion altogether? If you left at least you'd have your uncle and aunties support
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    (Original post by anonoymous123)
    I have been brought up to be an Ahmadi Muslim but over time I have started doubting the religion. Recently, I have discovered that I do not agree with the religion at all and would like to stop wearing the head scarf (which i was forced to wear) and want to stop following the teachings of Islam. However, if I leave Islam, my family will dis-own me and I know this as my uncle and aunt left Islam and the whole family has lost contact with them. What should I do?
    Possibly ask for advice from the ex-Muslims over on the religion threads.
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    i grew up in a semi-devout household. my mum is more liberal than my dad. they haven't really forced the religion on me, but they're probably expecting me to learn the quran and start praying one day. too bad i left islam.

    i have had friends with families that were cult members, alot actually. if you're below 18 never tell them. if you're over 18 and left the house (for uni etc.) it is your choice, tell them if you want to.

    being a female is worse to be honest. follow what they say till you're 18, like i said. if you feel like you want to carry on being a muslim, go right ahead. if you're still not a muslim it is your choice to tell them. just obey them for now (might sound awkward for non-muslims but this is how it is).
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    (Original post by Ali12121)
    It’s funny how every muslim that gets raised in a extremely religious family and not normally religious muslims end up leaving their religion. You don’t know the purpose of Islam but have rather been forced to see it. Take for instance the hijab. You cannot know the true meaning of it which is modesty if you had it enforced onto you without your own conscience making a decision. I think what you lack is tolerance and you cannot gain that within the context of Islam anymore.
    I do understand the reason behind the headscarf, which is that a woman should protect her beauty from all men apart from her husband, however I find it unfair how males don't have to cover themselves. This religions standards are what I don't like, men are seen to be superior and women inferior.
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    (Original post by anonoymous123)
    I have been brought up to be an Ahmadi Muslim but over time I have started doubting the religion. Recently, I have discovered that I do not agree with the religion at all and would like to stop wearing the head scarf (which i was forced to wear) and want to stop following the teachings of Islam. However, if I leave Islam, my family will dis-own me and I know this as my uncle and aunt left Islam and the whole family has lost contact with them. What should I do?
    Hi . I'm also an Ahmadi Muslim, I can see what problems you are having, so if you need any advice do send a PM.
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    (Original post by anonoymous123)
    I have been brought up to be an Ahmadi Muslim but over time I have started doubting the religion. Recently, I have discovered that I do not agree with the religion at all and would like to stop wearing the head scarf (which i was forced to wear) and want to stop following the teachings of Islam. However, if I leave Islam, my family will dis-own me and I know this as my uncle and aunt left Islam and the whole family has lost contact with them. What should I do?
    Also what part of religion are troubling you in particular apart from headscarf?
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    (Original post by JMR2017)
    Also what part of religion are troubling you in particular apart from headscarf?
    There are many reasons including:
    - the fact that Muslims are taught to hate gay people (although I, myself am straight)
    - the fact that men are seemed to be more dominant and are treated better
    - Ahmadis believe in Hazoor (a man who says that Allah appointed him to be the leader) and have to accept it, even if there is no evidence.
    - Ahmadis also have to pay a specific amount to the Mosque which is said to be for charity and for building mosques (however if every ahmadi in the world paid, there would be £billions) what actually happens with the extra money? Also if you don't pay you are not considered a Muslim
    - I don't like the fact that Islam teaches it is ok to slap your child if they don't pray.

    I do stand up for Islam when people call all Muslims terrorists and say other bad stereotypes, however I personally don't want to be in a religion that can accept nearly anyone as their leader and treats women as inferior
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    (Original post by anonoymous123)
    There are many reasons including:
    - the fact that Muslims are taught to hate gay people (although I, myself am straight)
    - the fact that men are seemed to be more dominant and are treated better
    - Ahmadis believe in Hazoor (a man who says that Allah appointed him to be the leader) and have to accept it, even if there is no evidence.
    - Ahmadis also have to pay a specific amount to the Mosque which is said to be for charity and for building mosques (however if every ahmadi in the world paid, there would be £billions) what actually happens with the extra money? Also if you don't pay you are not considered a Muslim
    - I don't like the fact that Islam teaches it is ok to slap your child if they don't pray.

    I do stand up for Islam when people call all Muslims terrorists and say other bad stereotypes, however I personally don't want to be in a religion that can accept nearly anyone as their leader and treats women as inferior.
    1) If you noticed the Ahmadiyya motto, you would know that we're supposed to hate nobody.

    2) Men are not at all superior to women. They only have primary responsibility to be breadwinners that's it. Read this verse in the Holy Quran:

    "Surely, men who submit themselves to God and women who submit themselves to Him, and believing men and believing women, and obedient men and obedient women and truthful men and truthful women, and men steadfast in their faith and steadfast women, and men who are humble and women who are humble, and men who give alms and women who give alms, and men who fast and women who fast, and men who guard their chastity and women who guard their chastity, and men who remember Allah much and women who remember Him — Allah has prepared for all of them forgiveness and a great reward." (33.36)

    3) If we accept the Promised Messiah, in whose favour there are many truthful signs then surely we have to believe in his successors, right?

    4) As you probably know, some pay a lot, some don't pay a lot. The money goes towards mosques, yes, but lots of other stuff like Jalsa in every country, schools in Africa, hospitals and medical centre, like the Tahir heart centre in Pakistan, and lots of projects around the world. When you look at it that way you can see how it gets spent pretty quickly.

    5) I don't know about you, but my parents never slapped me for not praying.


    At the end of the day, it's your choice what you want to do, but you can ask me if you have any questions.
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