san_cisco
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I have GCSEs this year and I've been stuck on how to revise. Usually, I would just memorise it all but I've come to the realisation that if I don't actually understand what I'm learning, I won't the top grades that are expected of me. (I have an academic scholarship.) I've found that repetition is useful for me to learn. I use Quizlet a lot but it's only useful for learning short definitions and doesn't really work with large quantities of information. I don't like revision techniques where my brain isn't very active and let's be honest, who does? Making mind maps and notes doesn't work for me because it means I am staring at a piece of paper and my head starts to hurt which turns my revision stagnant.

I reckon that if I do lots of practice questions, papers, online quizzes, revisions games and the occasional Quizlet, (for subjects like science and business studies, not maths) for the next 6 months, is it possible to get top grades or not?

If not, what other techniques would you recommend?

(Please keep in kind that I have considered the Feynman technique, if anyone knows what that is, but doesn't leave a lot of room for repetition for me anyway.
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Purdy7
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The most important thing is to find out what type of learner you are. Are you oral (you remember what you hear), visual (you remember what you see) or Kinesthetic (you remember while moving).

It doesn't sound like you are visual as mind maps etc aren't working for you, so try saying the stuff out loud, and or walking round the room while learning.

The technical bit:
The short term memory can only hold 5-9 items at once before it dumps it into forgetfulness, so you need to learn in small bite size chunks. It takes the repetition over time to get it to go into the long term memory. This is best done in the following way - go over notes 5 minutes after class then daily, weekly, monthly and only at the 6 monthly level is it etched in the memory long term.

The memory creates pathways, so try to associate what you are learning with what you already know and build on it. Have you tried the journey method (associating items to a journey you take) and can be easier to remember. Use as much of the sense as you can, as they will help the memory process, as well as trying to revise in different locations.

Source: Atkinson and Hildgard Introduction to Psychology.
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mez_merising
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http://www.educationplanner.org/stud...les-quiz.shtml
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san_cisco
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(Original post by Purdy7)
The most important thing is to find out what type of learner you are. Are you oral (you remember what you hear), visual (you remember what you see) or Kinesthetic (you remember while moving).

It doesn't sound like you are visual as mind maps etc aren't working for you, so try saying the stuff out loud, and or walking round the room while learning.

The technical bit:
The short term memory can only hold 5-9 items at once before it dumps it into forgetfulness, so you need to learn in small bite size chunks. It takes the repetition over time to get it to go into the long term memory. This is best done in the following way - go over notes 5 minutes after class then daily, weekly, monthly and only at the 6 monthly level is it etched in the memory long term.

The memory creates pathways, so try to associate what you are learning with what you already know and build on it. Have you tried the journey method (associating items to a journey you take) and can be easier to remember. Use as much of the sense as you can, as they will help the memory process, as well as trying to revise in different locations.

Source: Atkinson and Hildgard Introduction to Psychology.
Thank you so much. I'm a kinesthetic learner. I'll try the Journey method and I'll try reviewing my notes after class.
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noorah.dj
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watch "science with hazel" on youtube - her revision vids are the ****
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Purdy7
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As a kinesthetic learner, you need to use movement to remember. Walk around the room, literally go walking outside while reciting, try dancing, or remembering with rhythm like musical lyrics.

Good Luck.
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