Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    Hi,
    I'm currently looking at the Pilgrimage of Grace as part of the AQA Power and the People breadth study and I'm struggling to find any information on the impacts of the revolt.This could possibly be because there aren't any, however I do need to be able to at least come up with a couple of ideas during the exam so any help would be much appreciated!
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Laura/)
    Hi,
    I'm currently looking at the Pilgrimage of Grace as part of the AQA Power and the People breadth study and I'm struggling to find any information on the impacts of the revolt.This could possibly be because there aren't any, however I do need to be able to at least come up with a couple of ideas during the exam so any help would be much appreciated!
    The Pilgrimage of Grace was probably the largest threat to Henry VIII from within his own country and could have ended disastrously for him so you will definitely be able to find some impacts. Some ideas that you could think about:

    - The impact on Northern society. Around 200 people were executed including some locally important gentlemen and some minor noblemen. How would local power and society have been affected by their executions?
    - Impact on Northern families. All the people who were executed had family and friends. How would they have felt about Henry VIII? Would they have still felt some anger?
    - Relations between Henry VIII and northern society. The rebellion damaged Henry VIII's trust in the areas of the country that rebelled and, whilst those areas may not have rebelled again, that didn't mean that the problems that led to them rebelling were solved. When Henry VIII did a progress of the North in 1541, representatives of the towns he visited had to beg his forgiveness for the events of the rebellion even though 5 years had passed.
    - The religious houses. There were still monasteries in 1536 but in 1537 Thomas Cromwell started inquiring into their loyalty - how much might this be because some heads of religious houses supported the Pilgrimage of Grace?
    - There's a lot of debate about Henry VIII's character and whether he was a tyrant, what drove him etc. There is no easy answer but it might be worth thinking about 1536 as a whole - his first wife died, his illegitimate son died, his second wife was accused of adultery and he faced a major rebellion - do you think this might have made him more distrustful?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kiki09)
    The Pilgrimage of Grace was probably the largest threat to Henry VIII from within his own country and could have ended disastrously for him so you will definitely be able to find some impacts. Some ideas that you could think about:

    - The impact on Northern society. Around 200 people were executed including some locally important gentlemen and some minor noblemen. How would local power and society have been affected by their executions?
    - Impact on Northern families. All the people who were executed had family and friends. How would they have felt about Henry VIII? Would they have still felt some anger?
    - Relations between Henry VIII and northern society. The rebellion damaged Henry VIII's trust in the areas of the country that rebelled and, whilst those areas may not have rebelled again, that didn't mean that the problems that led to them rebelling were solved. When Henry VIII did a progress of the North in 1541, representatives of the towns he visited had to beg his forgiveness for the events of the rebellion even though 5 years had passed.
    - The religious houses. There were still monasteries in 1536 but in 1537 Thomas Cromwell started inquiring into their loyalty - how much might this be because some heads of religious houses supported the Pilgrimage of Grace?
    - There's a lot of debate about Henry VIII's character and whether he was a tyrant, what drove him etc. There is no easy answer but it might be worth thinking about 1536 as a whole - his first wife died, his illegitimate son died, his second wife was accused of adultery and he faced a major rebellion - do you think this might have made him more distrustful?
    Thank you, that's given me a lot to think about!
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: October 31, 2017

University open days

  • University of Buckingham
    Psychology Taster Tutorial Undergraduate
    Fri, 14 Dec '18
  • University of Lincoln
    Mini Open Day at the Brayford Campus Undergraduate
    Wed, 19 Dec '18
  • University of East Anglia
    UEA Mini Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 4 Jan '19
Poll
Were you ever put in isolation at school?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.