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    I feel like I hesitate too much at roundabouts when I drive. In the driving test, if there's a lot of traffic, is it a good idea to look for cars crossing over the roundabout that cars on your right would have to stop for, thus giving you a chance to get across? If you don't use these opportunities, is it hesitation.
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    (Original post by A*my)
    I feel like I hesitate too much at roundabouts when I drive. In the driving test, if there's a lot of traffic, is it a good idea to look for cars crossing over the roundabout that cars on your right would have to stop for, thus giving you a chance to get across? If you don't use these opportunities, is it hesitation.
    Hey there!

    This thread should be in the Learning to drive forum. I'll just tag AngryJellyfish to get this moved over there
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    (Original post by RoyalSheepy)
    Hey there!

    This thread should be in the Learning to drive forum. I'll just tag AngryJellyfish to get this moved over there
    The amount of times that you've posted this lol.
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    (Original post by A*my)
    I feel like I hesitate too much at roundabouts when I drive. In the driving test, if there's a lot of traffic, is it a good idea to look for cars crossing over the roundabout that cars on your right would have to stop for, thus giving you a chance to get across? If you don't use these opportunities, is it hesitation.
    Just always look to your right. In addition, you can use a vehicles tyres to judge where they'll go. It only counts as hesitation when you miss too many opportunities. Missing one or two might not count as hesitation.
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    I have the same problem!

    Don't worry undue hesitation is only minor and you can have up to 15 of these in your test - it's usually majors that cause people to fail rather than going over this limit.

    It is much better to hesitate at a roundabout and to go when it is safe rather than pulling out when a car is coming by rushing (which is a major/instant fail).

    It's something that comes with practice - eventually you won't notice and you will have an innate sense when it is and isn't safe to go.

    For now just be cautious, it doesn't matter if you pick up a couple of minors for it!
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    (Original post by Black Water)
    The amount of times that you've posted this lol.
    My job is done then :smug: You now know about my forums
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    (Original post by A*my)
    I feel like I hesitate too much at roundabouts when I drive. In the driving test, if there's a lot of traffic, is it a good idea to look for cars crossing over the roundabout that cars on your right would have to stop for, thus giving you a chance to get across? If you don't use these opportunities, is it hesitation.
    In my first test (I got only 3 minors, but hit a kerb 200 yards from being back at the test centre and failed 😂😭) I got a minor for hesitation and I hesitated for quite a long time. You can get more than one minor for the same error. It's much better to get a minor for hesitating than a major - and a fail - for being unsafe.

    I've now driven over 2,000 miles alone after passing my second test, and what you've described are generally good opportunities to go. However, bear in mind that cars on the roundabout can travel at speed, and if you're not sure - it's better to wait and risk the minor than go if it's dangerous.
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    That was the method my instructor used, I passed first time
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    (Original post by RoyalSheepy)
    My job is done then :smug: You now know about my forums

    :laugh:
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    You've just gotta look over to your right and move off when you have the opportunity to. This mainly includes any cars turning off at the exit before you or no cars coming. If you do miss an opportunity then do make a point of saying out loud something like "ahh, I could have gone then!" so they examiner doesn't sit there wondering why you didn't spot the gap (that's what my instructor told me to do anyway and his pass rate was excellent).

    Either way, missing a gap is only a minor fault. Repeated missing of gaps and/or causing tailbacks in traffic due to your unnecessary hesitation could result in a fail.
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    Roundabouts are something I found very hard- just remember that it all gets easier after you’ve finished learning! A hesitation is just something which could cause confusion to the person behind you. If you think it is safe to go- definitely go for it. But if you’re not sure it’s safe, make sure you’re vocal and tell the examiner that you believed it wasn’t safe.
    Something I struggled with is seeing where someone was going and worrying they’d not turn where I thought they would- that’s definitely a confidence thing. Personally, once I’d passed my test I found it all so much easier- maybe it was just nerves of someone watching my every move lessons, haha! You’ll get there- I passed on my third attempt. It’s really difficult and depends solely on the day, and centres have pass rates too.So don’t get down hearted if the day doesn’t go the way you wanted.
    Good luck, I’m sure you’ll do awesome!
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    It's always best to hesitate then go when your unsure. The worst you'll get for hesitation is a minor, while if you go when there is traffic and it's no safe you could get a major. Still learning the best time to go at roundabouts comes with practice. You just need to practice to learn the tells of what a car is doing (turning off or carrying on)
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