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    I’m currently in year 12. Answering and discussing a few questions regarding law. What subjects would be best to take at A level, work experience and personal statement ideas ??
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    Dear student, I am currently in year 12 studying law, I would recommend doing History and English at A-level, and Law if you really want to. I would advise that you look into doing work experience at law firms. some law firms offer work for students at school. For support on your personal statement, I would advise that you reach out to your school/college.
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    Thank for the advice. Unfortunately we don’t do law as a a level at school however I do English and Politics.
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    (Original post by apk1)
    I’m currently in year 12. Answering and discussing a few questions regarding law. What subjects would be best to take at A level, work experience and personal statement ideas ??
    Hi,

    Although I've never studied law, my brother is in the year above you applying to law so I can give you some examples of the things he's done to boost his PS!

    He has visited the crown courts of his home city, as well as Sheffield and Nottingham to sit in on public cases, picking out what interested him about them and explaining them in his personal statement - this is something so easy to do!

    He was lucky enough to get work experience at a law firm through a distant family member, but as the poster mentioned above there may be law firms or solicitors or the likes who will happily help students get work experience with them. I think this is probably a key thing to do to confirm your interest in law! It will also give you a lot to talk about in your personal statement

    Although he didn't study law at a-level, he did complete an EPQ related to law. If you have the chance to do this I would recommend it as it not only shows that you can complete essays using similar methods as you will have to at uni, but it will give you an insight into whichever aspect of law you choose to write about.

    There are also additional things like "open learn" courses, MOOCs, and many free online foundation courses you can do to boost your knowledge if you may have to attend an interview or just to mention in your personal statement.

    If there are any law journals, magazines or online outlets you could get a subscription to this would be another thing that could help.

    I hope this helps,

    Ellie
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    (Original post by apk1)
    I’m currently in year 12. Answering and discussing a few questions regarding law. What subjects would be best to take at A level, work experience and personal statement ideas ??
    The best subjects for Law imo would be an essay based subject (History or English Literature), a subject that requires logical thinking (Maths) and then the 3rd one doesn’t really matter (Economics, Politics, MFL etc.)

    But at the end of the day the subjects you’ll do the best in are obvious choices.
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    (Original post by apk1)
    I’m currently in year 12. Answering and discussing a few questions regarding law. What subjects would be best to take at A level, work experience and personal statement ideas ??
    I think Fonzworth covered the A-Level question quite well.

    The work experience point is more complex. The basic advice is that work experience won't help your application because the admission tutors only care about your ability to undertake academic work. They care not so much that your auntie's husband works for a mid-sized Midlands-based law firm, and got you in. That is all that experience shows because you won't be doing anything substantive. Moreover, you are competing against very rich international students (many of whom are 22+ and have worked substantively in law-allied professions). One person from my cohort had worked in the Singaporean military legal services; do you think that your visiting the Crown Court can possibly compete against that? I tell you; it won't. Other than if you're applying to low-tier unis, where you won't face such sophisticated competition, but then again they don't even care what's in your PS.

    Spoiler:
    Show



    And what do you get from visiting the courts anyway? You probably won't stay for the whole hearing, so you'll walk in on the 3rd day for one after noon, where you will hear the judge and counsel continue on from a conversation they were having from the previous days. And then it's lunchtime and you leave, and you're none the wiser.




    The thing you should do is focus on legal academic activities. You can read books, journal articles, and cases. This is especially possible with public law topics which are usually consumer-facing and not particularly challenging, for pre-applicant or PhD. What do you think about joint-enterprise? Brexit judgment in the Supreme Court, did it threaten "popular sovereignty" (i.e. the sovereignty of the people)? Do you think the Human Rights Act should be repealed, or do you think that the human right protections are enshrined in international law anyway jus cogens, as well as English common law, and repealing the Human Rights Act won't make a jot of practical difference? And you have various other questions in administrative/constitutional and criminal law. Litter your PS with these trite topics and you should be set.
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    (Original post by SHUGURU)
    Hi,

    Although I've never studied law, my brother is in the year above you applying to law so I can give you some examples of the things he's done to boost his PS!

    He has visited the crown courts of his home city, as well as Sheffield and Nottingham to sit in on public cases, picking out what interested him about them and explaining them in his personal statement - this is something so easy to do!

    He was lucky enough to get work experience at a law firm through a distant family member, but as the poster mentioned above there may be law firms or solicitors or the likes who will happily help students get work experience with them. I think this is probably a key thing to do to confirm your interest in law! It will also give you a lot to talk about in your personal statement

    Although he didn't study law at a-level, he did complete an EPQ related to law. If you have the chance to do this I would recommend it as it not only shows that you can complete essays using similar methods as you will have to at uni, but it will give you an insight into whichever aspect of law you choose to write about.

    There are also additional things like "open learn" courses, MOOCs, and many free online foundation courses you can do to boost your knowledge if you may have to attend an interview or just to mention in your personal statement.

    If there are any law journals, magazines or online outlets you could get a subscription to this would be another thing that could help.

    I hope this helps,

    Ellie
    Thanks! Very useful.
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    (Original post by Fonzworth)
    The best subjects for Law imo would be an essay based subject (History or English Literature), a subject that requires logical thinking (Maths) and then the 3rd one doesn’t really matter (Economics, Politics, MFL etc.)

    But at the end of the day the subjects you’ll do the best in are obvious choices.
    Yh, I agree! Thanks
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    I think Fonzworth covered the A-Level question quite well.

    The work experience point is more complex. The basic advice is that work experience won't help your application because the admission tutors only care about your ability to undertake academic work. They care not so much that your auntie's husband works for a mid-sized Midlands-based law firm, and got you in. That is all that experience shows because you won't be doing anything substantive. Moreover, you are competing against very rich international students (many of whom are 22+ and have worked substantively in law-allied professions). One person from my cohort had worked in the Singaporean military legal services; do you think that your visiting the Crown Court can possibly compete against that? I tell you; it won't. Other than if you're applying to low-tier unis, where you won't face such sophisticated competition, but then again they don't even care what's in your PS.

    Spoiler:
    Show




    And what do you get from visiting the courts anyway? You probably won't stay for the whole hearing, so you'll walk in on the 3rd day for one after noon, where you will hear the judge and counsel continue on from a conversation they were having from the previous days. And then it's lunchtime and you leave, and you're none the wiser.





    The thing you should do is focus on legal academic activities. You can read books, journal articles, and cases. This is especially possible with public law topics which are usually consumer-facing and not particularly challenging, for pre-applicant or PhD. What do you think about joint-enterprise? Brexit judgment in the Supreme Court, did it threaten "popular sovereignty" (i.e. the sovereignty of the people)? Do you think the Human Rights Act should be repealed, or do you think that the human right protections are enshrined in international law anyway jus cogens, as well as English common law, and repealing the Human Rights Act won't make a jot of practical difference? And you have various other questions in administrative/constitutional and criminal law. Litter your PS with these trite topics and you should be set.
    damn. thanks, v useful.
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    (Original post by apk1)
    I’m currently in year 12. Answering and discussing a few questions regarding law. What subjects would be best to take at A level, work experience and personal statement ideas ??
    If you can do politics Alevel definitely do it, i didn't get the opportunity to do it but it would have definitely helped. I done English, Irish (Im in the North of Ireland), Sociology and history, these subjects definitely helped as their essay based, so gives you a great skillset for studying law.

    I didn't go to uni straight away. I got a job in a solicitors office and worked my way up from reception to junior legal secretary while doing some admin qualifications. I have since started studying Law and luckily have been kept on on a part time basis. In the world of law experience is literally priceless... When i qualify (and if I keep working as a junior legal secretary throughout my degree) I'll have around 6 years experience. I'm not saying take a few years out before uni if you don't want to but definitely get the ball rolling experience wise... even ask local firms if you can do a few afternoons a week filing or doing post, and maybe you could even end up working over summer. The competition for training contracts is crazy so the more you can talk about in interviews the better.

    - B xx
 
 
 
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