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B1297 - Prison Reform Bill 2017, TSR Government Watch

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    B1297 - Prison Reform Bill 2017, TSR Government


    Prison Reform Bill 2017



    An Act to increase rehabilitation by removing obstacles to released prisoners and restricting custodial sentences to those deemed a risk to the public.

    BE IT ENACTED by The Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the consent of the Commons in this present parliament assembled, in accordance with the provisions of the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949, and by the authority of the same, as follows:-


    PART I.
    REHABILITATION OF OFFENDERS

    1 Amends The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974, sec. (5) Table A-

    (a) A custodial sentence of more than 30 months and up to, or consisting of, 48 months

    (i) The end of the period of 7 years beginning with the day on which the sentence (including any licence period) is completed

    (ii) The end of the period of 42 months beginning with the day on which the sentence (including any licence period) is completed

    to;

    (a) A custodial sentence of more than 30 months and up to, or consisting of, 48 months

    (i) The end of the period of 3years beginning with the day on which the sentence (including any licence period) is completed

    (ii) The end of the period of 24 months beginning with the day on which the sentence (including any licence period) is completed

    2 Amends The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974, sec. (5) Table A-

    (a) A custodial sentence of more than 6 months and up to, or consisting of, 30 months

    (i) The end of the period of 48 months beginning with the day on which the sentence (including any licence period) is completed

    (ii) The end of the period of 24 months beginning with the day on which the sentence (including any licence period) is completed

    to;

    (a) A custodial sentence of more than 6 months and up to, or consisting of, 30 months

    (i) The end of the period of 24 months beginning with the day on which the sentence (including any licence period) is completed

    (ii) The end of the period of 18 months beginning with the day on which the sentence (including any licence period) is completed

    3 Amends The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974, sec. (5) Table A-

    (a) A custodial sentence of 6 months or less

    (i) The end of the period of 24 months beginning with the day on which the sentence (including any licence period) is completed

    (ii) The end of the period of 18 months beginning with the day on which the sentence (including any licence period) is completed

    to;

    (a) A custodial sentence of 6 months or less

    (i) The end of the period of 12 months beginning with the date of the conviction in respect of which the sentence is imposed

    (ii) The end of the period of 9 months beginning with the day on which the sentence (including any licence period) is completed

    4 Amends The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974, sec. (5) Table A-

    (a) A fine

    (i) The end of the period of 12 months beginning with the date of the conviction in respect of which the sentence is imposed

    (ii) The end of the period of 6 months beginning with the date of the conviction in respect of which the sentence is imposed

    to;

    (a) A fine

    (i) The end of the period of 6 months beginning with the date of the conviction in respect of which the sentence is imposed

    (ii) The end of the period of 3 months beginning with the date of the conviction in respect of which the sentence is imposed

    5 Amends The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974, sec. (5) Table A-

    (a) A community or youth rehabilitation order

    (i) The end of the period of 12 months beginning with the date of the conviction in respect of which the sentence is imposed

    (ii) The end of the period of 6 months beginning with the day provided for by or under the order as the last day on which the order is to have effect

    to;

    (a) A community or youth rehabilitation order

    (i) The end of the period of 6 months beginning with the date of the conviction in respect of which the sentence is imposed

    (ii) The end of the period of 3 months beginning with the day provided for by or under the order as the last day on which the order is to have effect

    6 Inserts into The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974, sec. (4)

    (5) Subject to 6.(4)(a) The judge may choose to restart the original time of rehabilitation where,

    (a) the extension on rehabilitation does not surpass the rehabilitation period for the maximum sentence for the crime in question.




    PART II.
    REFORM OF PRISONS


    7 Appends The Criminal Juctice Act 2003 sec 142(1)(a)-

    where,

    (i) this is not the sole reason as given by sec.142(1) when sentencing.

    8 Prisons will provide literacy and numeracy programs up to at leave level 2 and must also provide at least one vocational training route where,

    (a) the prison does not hold only prisoners who will stay on a short term basis where,

    (i) ‘short term’ here applied to under 6 months

    (b) the vocational trade route should be based on trades in demand in the area where the prison is located.




    PART III.
    COMMENCEMENT, SHORT TITLE AND EXTENT


    9 This Act shall come into force 1st April 2019

    10 This Act may be cited as the Prison Reform Act 2017

    11 This Act extends to the whole of the United Kingdom


    Notes1-5: Reduces time for a conviction to become spent.

    6: Allows for this time to be extended as part of a punishment for further offences.

    7: Removes punishment from being a sole reason for a custodial sentence. Note that it can still form part of a punishment. Where there is no threat to the public and no need for prison as a means to enforce rehabilitation other forms of punishment should be used.

    8: Provides all prisoners with sentences lasting more than 6 months with access to literacy, numeracy and a trade. This helps create opportunities for rehabilitation.
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    Labour are soft on crime - what a surprise.

    A strong nay - we cannot allow criminals to get off easy.
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    I support these moves for the shorter custodial sentences but not the longer custodial sentences.
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    (Original post by Connor27)
    Labour are soft on crime - what a surprise.

    A strong nay - we cannot allow criminals to get off easy.
    Libertarian not very libertarian on crime - what a surprise

    A strong aye - we cannot allow our justice system to fail society
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    (Original post by Jacob E)
    I support these moves for the shorter custodial sentences but not the longer custodial sentences.
    :confused: This doesn't give longer custodial sentences.
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    (Original post by DayneD89)
    :confused: This doesn't give longer custodial sentences.
    I think you have misinterpreted what was written, I support lowering the time for a crime to spent for crimes receiving lower custodial sentences but not for the crimes given higher custodial sentences.
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    Whilst I applaud the right honourable Justice Secretary for making provisions to provide literacy and numeracy education for convicts inside prison and I suggest adding further skilled education to become available for prisoners whilst inside. I do not, however, agree with a soft on crime viewpoint. Whilst we may need to attempt rehabilitation, this I do not deny, I fear we forget that they did commit an offence. They still need some amount of punishment in lieu of their acts and I feel this act introduces more leniency into the system.

    Nay.
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    Generally, I acknowledge the overcrowding in prisons throughout the United Kingdom, but I remain emphatically against the de facto reduction of sentences. For the time being, nay - we must be tougher on crime; not appease it.
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    (Original post by Connor27)
    Labour are soft on crime - what a surprise.

    A strong nay - we cannot allow criminals to get off easy.
    So you would rather get some sort of vengeance then make our streets and our citizens safer? How reckless are you?!
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    I concur with the Shadow Justice Secretary, Wilhuff Tarkin. Nay.
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    (Original post by Wilhuff Tarkin)
    Whilst I applaud the right honourable Justice Secretary for making provisions to provide literacy and numeracy education for convicts inside prison and I suggest adding further skilled education to become available for prisoners whilst inside. I do not, however, agree with a soft on crime viewpoint. Whilst we may need to attempt rehabilitation, this I do not deny, I fear we forget that they did commit an offence. They still need some amount of punishment in lieu of their acts and I feel this act introduces more leniency into the system.

    Nay.
    I am not the author of this Bill. By effectively destroying lives after custodial sentences you are advocating leaving people with no other options. However, it does not surprise me that the Conservative Party supports punishment for punishment's sake ahead of reducing crime rates.
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    (Original post by ns_2)
    Generally, I acknowledge the overcrowding in prisons throughout the United Kingdom, but I remain emphatically against the de facto reduction of sentences. For the time being, nay - we must be tougher on crime; not appease it.
    The complete removal of the vast majority of a person's rights and liberties is a very extreme punishment that I expect, in time, we will come to see as a barbaric to most of the offences it has traditionally been used for. Punishment on its own is for me insufficient reason to imprison someone - it needs to be a last resort only used if they must be removed from society for the public's safety or so that they can be rehabilitated. We should in my opinion consider the introduction of considerably more stringent community sentences which could feasibly replace imprisonment for many criminals, extending into periods of years if necessary. But in the mean time, this bill is a considerable step in the right direction.
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    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    The complete removal of the vast majority of a person's rights and liberties is a very extreme punishment that I expect, in time, we will come to see as a barbaric to most of the offences it has traditionally been used for. Punishment on its own is for me insufficient reason to imprison someone - it needs to be a last resort only used if they must be removed from society for the public's safety or so that they can be rehabilitated. We should in my opinion consider the introduction of considerably more stringent community sentences which could feasibly replace imprisonment for many criminals, extending into periods of years if necessary. But in the mean time, this bill is a considerable step in the right direction.
    If a person dares to break our laws - laws designed to protect the safety and security of people throughout the United Kingdom - and a judge deems it necessary, I do support the (as you phrased it) "the complete removal of the vast majority of a person's rights and liberties" especially in barbaric and senseless crimes (though I accept this bill is not proposing letting murderers free, or at least I hope not).

    I do however acknowledge that certain offences shouldn't be punishable solely by prison sentences - most notably, those that do not harm the 'safety and security of people throughout the United Kingdom'; however, they remain offences against British law. In these cases, prison sentences should be continued to be issued to 'hammer home the severity of the offence nonetheless' coupled with external community sentences to give back after said prison sentence, and only if the person in question shows true remorse/acknowledgement of his/her crime.

    Regardless, crime must be punished; criminals, in the words of my great colleague and Shadow Justice Secretary Wilhuff Tarkin, need "some amount of punishment in lieu of their acts and this act introduces more leniency into the system."

    Nay.
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    Aye.
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    (Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
    I am not the author of this Bill. By effectively destroying lives after custodial sentences you are advocating leaving people with no other options. However, it does not surprise me that the Conservative Party supports punishment for punishment's sake ahead of reducing crime rates.
    Being soft on crime increases crime rates by effectively making a criminal sentence a "badge of dishonour" rather than a deterrent, as it should be.

    Most criminals are not victims of circumstance; they make a rational choice with malicious intent when they break our laws; we cannot allow this to go unpunished.
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    (Original post by Connor27)
    Being soft on crime increases crime rates by effectively making a criminal sentence a "badge of dishonour" rather than a deterrent, as it should be.

    Most criminals are not victims of circumstance; they make a rational choice with malicious intent when they break our laws; we cannot allow this to go unpunished.
    citation? Or is that just a baseless assertion?
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    (Original post by Connor27)
    Being soft on crime increases crime rates by effectively making a criminal sentence a "badge of dishonour" rather than a deterrent, as it should be.

    Most criminals are not victims of circumstance; they make a rational choice with malicious intent when they break our laws; we cannot allow this to go unpunished.
    This is hardly allowing them to go unpunished, it is just giving them a better chance to return to normal society after serving their punishment. I don't think this has any effect on prison as a form of deterrence. I don't think the time that they will have to declare a crime for after leaving prison is even considered in all but the most meticulously planned crimes.
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    I think that there should be some exceptions, especially for sexual offences, and the range of non-custodial punishments or sentences should be reviewed. Somehow we need to allow for the fact that we live in an age where Internet based offences occur, can be found out about years later, and that there are a greater range of non-custodial sentences that could be used.

    I'd like to see passports withdrawn for a period after release as one option for sentencing, which for so-called white collar crime could be effective. Someone who has used.a motor vehicle to get to and from the place where a crime took place should not be allowed to drive immediately upon release.

    As things can be found out years later secretly by employers, somehow we need to think about how this is tackled.
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    aye
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    There needs to be a balanced approach when it comes to prisons. It should be a mix of punishment and rehab. Yes Criminals need to know what they have done is wrong and therefore prison is a punishment. however we should give prisoners the opportunity to gain qualifications in prison and to help prepare them to life outside of prison.

    I'll Abstain for now
 
 
 
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